Posts by AlumoAudio

943 posts Where words leave off, music begins.
  • Elite Author
  • Sold between 50 000 and 100 000 dollars
  • Interviewed on the Envato Notes blog
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AlumoAudio says


i im thinkin those guys selling 90% of the stuff sold regularly are perhaps part of the site’s owners or friends/buddies. i mean, we have these guys that wanted to make some money so they made a site on which they promote mainly their stuff. makes sense. the current situation on aj (and as i understand, its always been this way) is totally absurd. someone should put an end to this perverted money scheme.
These people, Mister, have deserved their success and big sales. If you check Tim’s or Alumo’s or Pinkzebra’s or Bluefox best works, you’ll have to consider, that they have an OUTSTANDING quality, some are with OUTSTANDING vocals included.
They don’t need to be anyone’s friend or relative, they are PERFECT composers and GOOD market players.
And by the way they LITERALLY – attract many customers to this site, I suspect, some of your buyers as well.
I made it to top-selling iems list not for hearing such absurd words about site’s owners.
Everyone will get what he deserved. Period.
Forgive me my offensive tone, but please, show some respect to those guys, okay?

Thanks for that Andrew. I don’t think you were being offensive, just being honest and stating it how it is. We need a bit of that here!

Some of the statements on this thread drills home the fact that there are some seriously contrasting beliefs and opinions on the matter. In some cases, and on other threads too, I’m beginning to detect some kind of animosity towards those who have top selling items.

On that note, I can’t really be bothered to have a serious conversation and continue adding my thoughts on the matter. Good luck to you all and hope you finally figure things out.

943 posts Where words leave off, music begins.
  • Elite Author
  • Sold between 50 000 and 100 000 dollars
  • Interviewed on the Envato Notes blog
  • Author had a File in an Envato Bundle
  • Referred between 500 and 999 users
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  • United Kingdom
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AlumoAudio says


But what gets an item that attention in the first place is if it is high quality, highly usable and marketable. That is without question. (And this doesn’t just apply to AJ items, but across all marketplace items).
This is simply not true. You can have a highly usable item and nobody cares attention because nobody knows about this item.

As I mentioned in my earlier post:

Envato will undoubtedly utilise data and statistics of every item that has shown good selling potential to use in their decision making, such as choosing a featured item, promoting items via advertising or prioritising search visibility.

Whilst I agree there are many great, usable tracks that are tucked away here, the collected statistical data is the best indicator to Envato of the overall customer response to an item, which would help them determine which items to push, keep in high visibility and (as I hate to say it), remove from visibility.

That’s curation, and an important aspect to running a library, marketplace or system that is based on multiple assets. (YouTube, for example, use this statistical method to determine video rankings and results).

Some tracks just get a better continued response than others here on AJ. It’s a bitter pill to swallow, but a reality. That’s not to say Envato couldn’t try out some other ways to get item exposure (such as the staff picks), but I’d guess they wouldn’t want to roll something out like that without doing a bunch of A/B testing, etc, and without running the risk of completely unsettling the current business model.

943 posts Where words leave off, music begins.
  • Elite Author
  • Sold between 50 000 and 100 000 dollars
  • Interviewed on the Envato Notes blog
  • Author had a File in an Envato Bundle
  • Referred between 500 and 999 users
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AlumoAudio says

Thank your for condescending…

LOL my apologies but I wasn’t speaking for myself there. I personally love chatting on the forums about stuff when I get the time. I was just making a gross assumption on why others may have not spoken up about it! :)

943 posts Where words leave off, music begins.
  • Elite Author
  • Sold between 50 000 and 100 000 dollars
  • Interviewed on the Envato Notes blog
  • Author had a File in an Envato Bundle
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AlumoAudio says

..I’ve had personal communications with, have used my music on their VH projects or have left feedback on my items.

Simple as that really.

ps. Ahhh, so it was you Paul who unfollowed me! Just kidding of course! ;)

943 posts Where words leave off, music begins.
  • Elite Author
  • Sold between 50 000 and 100 000 dollars
  • Interviewed on the Envato Notes blog
  • Author had a File in an Envato Bundle
  • Referred between 500 and 999 users
  • Has been a member for 2-3 years
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AlumoAudio says

Notice how top selling authors and all authors with 3000 or more sales just remain silent on these issues which are the untold truth? They don’t want to fix what is not broken for them. Their attitude is “everything is working out great for me! My product is sitting on that popular items page selling like crazy, guiding buyers to my portfolio each and every day.”

That’s certainly not the reason I haven’t spoken about it. I’ve seen this topic come up countless times on these forums over the past few years and I guess for most of the veterans here who’ve previously spoken up about it, it’s gotten a bit, well, old.

Sometimes, it may be difficult to wrap our heads around this little fact, but Envato is a business. Just like any other successful business on the planet, it will capitalise on it’s strongest assets to assure unhampered growth.

We could speculate all day long why these top selling tracks are a mainstay on that list. But lets not take away the fact that they got on that list in the first place for good reason. Because over time, they have proven themselves to Envato to sell consistently.

Envato will undoubtedly utilise data and statistics of every item that has shown good selling potential to use in their decision making, such as choosing a featured item, promoting items via advertising or prioritising search visibility. But what gets an item that attention in the first place is if it is high quality, highly usable and marketable. That is without question. (And this doesn’t just apply to AJ items, but across all marketplace items).

It’s all about Envato giving their blessing to certain individuals. They basically say “You will be a chosen one to make money on this site because we’re going to plug your track with ruthless, non stop, constant advertising.”

Without my own continuing external marketing, promotions and referrals of my track, I probably wouldn’t even be on that list. I know of a few others on that list that put a lot of backbone behind their promotions too, so I wouldn’t be so quick to put it down to Envato’s ‘ruthless’ efforts.

943 posts Where words leave off, music begins.
  • Elite Author
  • Sold between 50 000 and 100 000 dollars
  • Interviewed on the Envato Notes blog
  • Author had a File in an Envato Bundle
  • Referred between 500 and 999 users
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AlumoAudio says

Tx Alumo for investigative work. The most important thing to remember about submitting to AdRev or any other Content iD system, is it prevents you from using most other non exclusive libraries to license your work. They simply will not consider any tracks in these systems. Simply, if a customer gets a track from them and gets a copyright notice it looks very bad for them and takes up hours of their time to rectify.

Yes, it’s true that some libraries still won’t allow AdRev/ContentID tracked music to be submitted. As I’ve stressed numerous times over the past year on this subject, research libraries thoroughly before submitting, as to avoid any surprises later on. More often than not, these are smaller outfits that don’t have much of a support team at hand. As a result, they’re unfortunately continuing to resist moving forward with this new industry development, for fear of losing customers.

Personally out of the 20 or so libraries I license my music on, I don’t submit to any libraries that won’t allow fingerprinted works to be submitted, and have personally reached out to all my current library owners to explain the situation and explain the full process as to make the process dealing with any customers claims much easier.

I highly recommend that any non-exclusives who are considering getting their music tracked on AdRev or equivalent, consider first getting in touch with their libraries to make sure they’re ok with it.

943 posts Where words leave off, music begins.
  • Elite Author
  • Sold between 50 000 and 100 000 dollars
  • Interviewed on the Envato Notes blog
  • Author had a File in an Envato Bundle
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AlumoAudio says

Sorry I am a stickler for accuracy, if you can point me to anything regarding Youtube and Audiomicro developing content id and Youtube licensing it ?

@SkylineAudio: Not sure you’re still reading this thread Skyline, as you’re probably sleeping soundly, but finally I got to the bottom of it. I knew I wasn’t going crazy! Turns out ContentID was developed and licensed to YouTube by a company called AudibleMagic (not AudioMicro; it must have been the AM bit that threw me off course). It was announced here in 2007 and has been documented on this blog here. Sorry to bring this back up, but I’m a stickler for accuracy! ;)

@ilovemedia-es: No worries Raquel, happy to have helped. Regarding the fingerprinting, that’s a very good question and something I’m struggling to find a definitive answer on. It may well be worth dropping a quick message to AdRev, asking them about it, but I’m almost certain they’d recommend uploading the music via the self-service CID section of the AdRev site, without any watermark attached. The digital fingerprint needs to be as clear as possible for maximum detection results across YouTube, so it only makes sense to use a non watermarked version as the ‘master’.

Regarding uploading cover versions, public domain and remixes, then this won’t be allowed, as you do not own the original rights to the material. AdRev’s statement on this is: “Unless you are a label owner and or have worldwide rights to the ORIGINAL master, you may not upload remixes of any kind”, which can be found via their FAQ section here.

943 posts Where words leave off, music begins.
  • Elite Author
  • Sold between 50 000 and 100 000 dollars
  • Interviewed on the Envato Notes blog
  • Author had a File in an Envato Bundle
  • Referred between 500 and 999 users
  • Has been a member for 2-3 years
  • United Kingdom
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AlumoAudio says

If I had to spend 2 hours a week burning out these petty fires each week iId be quite annoyed by it all…

Then in that case I wouldn’t get involved. As I’ve mentioned numerous times before on this subject (also on other threads), there will be occasions of customers contacting us with concerns, and being prepared with all the right answers is paramount.

It’s all part and parcel of taking on the responsibility. If it’s not your bag, then it’s not your bag and a personal choice at the end of the day. To me it’s no different from the ThemeForest guys providing support for their items, and I certainly don’t view it as ‘burning out petty fires’, especially if it leads to repeat business.

Personally, I like having that peace of mind that my music is digitally protected and thoroughly enjoy helping and communicating with my buyers. I’ve been fortunate to have struck up some excellent business relationships through it too, especially once they realise it’s a painless process.

Taco is also spot on with the fact AdRev also work alongside some of the biggest names in the industry. I also strongly believe this is the way things are going in terms of protecting intellectual property online. I guess I want to be a part of that and just throwing the idea out there for others to consider and get involved with.

943 posts Where words leave off, music begins.
  • Elite Author
  • Sold between 50 000 and 100 000 dollars
  • Interviewed on the Envato Notes blog
  • Author had a File in an Envato Bundle
  • Referred between 500 and 999 users
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AlumoAudio says

It is important for composers to realise and understand the implications for them of entering into any such monetizing programs.

Exactly. Something I’ve always stressed with this.

Alongside that, I just hope composers are also considering the implications of NOT having their music fingerprinted too (and not just for monetization purposes either). It’s something every composer will need to consider on a personal level before committing to such a program.

943 posts Where words leave off, music begins.
  • Elite Author
  • Sold between 50 000 and 100 000 dollars
  • Interviewed on the Envato Notes blog
  • Author had a File in an Envato Bundle
  • Referred between 500 and 999 users
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AlumoAudio says

You say that “ContentID was developed and launched by AudioMicro Inc” how do you know this, Google/Youtube has been using this since 2007, Audiomicro was only formed in 2007. It certainly was not launched by Audiomicro as it already existed. As for contentid.com that was launched in 2013 by adrev and has nothing to do with Youtube apart from adminestering content id.

http://pando.com/2013/08/15/adrev-launches-contentid-com-brings-music-rights-management-to-the-youtube-masses/ Audiomicro are the parent company of AdRev you are correct in that. Sorry I am a stickler for accuracy, if you can point me to anything regarding Youtube and Audiomicro developing content id and Youtube licensing it ?

And it’s your sticklerishness (if that’s even a word) that’s just got me trying to trace all my information and look deeper into this…and hands up, seems you are indeed correct.

My apologies to you or anyone that absorbed my inaccuracy on that bit on information. But it looks like I got my wires crossed along the way with AM now using the ContentID moniker to promote their product, which you correctly stated was launched last year. Believe it or not, I’m a stickler for accuracy myself, so I’m kicking myself right now for delivering misinformation. There’s so much going on in this area, it’s a pretty hefty task for one guy alone to keep abreast of it all, so thanks for bringing it up and standing me corrected.

Either way, this fact still doesn’t undermine the value of digital fingerprinting for us composers, and I have first hand knowledge that the folks at AdRev work very closely with YouTube with the maintenance of such.

So you can now sleep soundly Skyline, whilst I’m rummaging around and correcting all my virtual paperwork, whilst scratching my head! ;)

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