Posts by AlumoAudio

936 posts Where words leave off, music begins.
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AlumoAudio says

If I had to spend 2 hours a week burning out these petty fires each week iId be quite annoyed by it all…

Then in that case I wouldn’t get involved. As I’ve mentioned numerous times before on this subject (also on other threads), there will be occasions of customers contacting us with concerns, and being prepared with all the right answers is paramount.

It’s all part and parcel of taking on the responsibility. If it’s not your bag, then it’s not your bag and a personal choice at the end of the day. To me it’s no different from the ThemeForest guys providing support for their items, and I certainly don’t view it as ‘burning out petty fires’, especially if it leads to repeat business.

Personally, I like having that peace of mind that my music is digitally protected and thoroughly enjoy helping and communicating with my buyers. I’ve been fortunate to have struck up some excellent business relationships through it too, especially once they realise it’s a painless process.

Taco is also spot on with the fact AdRev also work alongside some of the biggest names in the industry. I also strongly believe this is the way things are going in terms of protecting intellectual property online. I guess I want to be a part of that and just throwing the idea out there for others to consider and get involved with.

936 posts Where words leave off, music begins.
  • Elite Author
  • Sold between 50 000 and 100 000 dollars
  • Interviewed on the Envato Notes blog
  • Author had a File in an Envato Bundle
  • Referred between 500 and 999 users
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AlumoAudio says

It is important for composers to realise and understand the implications for them of entering into any such monetizing programs.

Exactly. Something I’ve always stressed with this.

Alongside that, I just hope composers are also considering the implications of NOT having their music fingerprinted too (and not just for monetization purposes either). It’s something every composer will need to consider on a personal level before committing to such a program.

936 posts Where words leave off, music begins.
  • Elite Author
  • Sold between 50 000 and 100 000 dollars
  • Interviewed on the Envato Notes blog
  • Author had a File in an Envato Bundle
  • Referred between 500 and 999 users
  • Has been a member for 2-3 years
  • United Kingdom
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AlumoAudio says

You say that “ContentID was developed and launched by AudioMicro Inc” how do you know this, Google/Youtube has been using this since 2007, Audiomicro was only formed in 2007. It certainly was not launched by Audiomicro as it already existed. As for contentid.com that was launched in 2013 by adrev and has nothing to do with Youtube apart from adminestering content id.

http://pando.com/2013/08/15/adrev-launches-contentid-com-brings-music-rights-management-to-the-youtube-masses/ Audiomicro are the parent company of AdRev you are correct in that. Sorry I am a stickler for accuracy, if you can point me to anything regarding Youtube and Audiomicro developing content id and Youtube licensing it ?

And it’s your sticklerishness (if that’s even a word) that’s just got me trying to trace all my information and look deeper into this…and hands up, seems you are indeed correct.

My apologies to you or anyone that absorbed my inaccuracy on that bit on information. But it looks like I got my wires crossed along the way with AM now using the ContentID moniker to promote their product, which you correctly stated was launched last year. Believe it or not, I’m a stickler for accuracy myself, so I’m kicking myself right now for delivering misinformation. There’s so much going on in this area, it’s a pretty hefty task for one guy alone to keep abreast of it all, so thanks for bringing it up and standing me corrected.

Either way, this fact still doesn’t undermine the value of digital fingerprinting for us composers, and I have first hand knowledge that the folks at AdRev work very closely with YouTube with the maintenance of such.

So you can now sleep soundly Skyline, whilst I’m rummaging around and correcting all my virtual paperwork, whilst scratching my head! ;)

936 posts Where words leave off, music begins.
  • Elite Author
  • Sold between 50 000 and 100 000 dollars
  • Interviewed on the Envato Notes blog
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  • Referred between 500 and 999 users
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AlumoAudio says
936 posts Where words leave off, music begins.
  • Elite Author
  • Sold between 50 000 and 100 000 dollars
  • Interviewed on the Envato Notes blog
  • Author had a File in an Envato Bundle
  • Referred between 500 and 999 users
  • Has been a member for 2-3 years
  • United Kingdom
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AlumoAudio says

why just exclusive authors? :(

Hey Matteo, this is open to non-exclusives too. In fact it always has been, but Exclusive authors were previously not allowed to do this, until now :)

936 posts Where words leave off, music begins.
  • Elite Author
  • Sold between 50 000 and 100 000 dollars
  • Interviewed on the Envato Notes blog
  • Author had a File in an Envato Bundle
  • Referred between 500 and 999 users
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AlumoAudio says

Scratch that…My question was answered… Just and FYI, I have spoken to a library owner who made the statement that they are generating $1000 a day of revenue on YOUTUBE. BUT…they clearly have thousands of tracks on thousands of YOUTUBE videos and the model is entirely based on giving away writer’s music for free to YOUTUBE videomakers (already unethical at best) so they can be the first one’s to profit from the ad REV scheme. Then supposedly they keep accounting and have a share of that revenue trickle down to writers. How can you possibly maintain records of that?

Hi Zineb, what you’re referring to here is a completely different model to what I’ve been speaking about. I’m referring to us composers directly uploading our music to AdRev to be fingerprinted, with the control firmly in our hands.

Unfortunately, some libraries are taking advantage of fingerprinting, and uploading the music on their composer’s behalf (sometimes without even telling them first) and reaping the ad revenue, which personally I don’t agree with at all. It can also cause major issues when customers attempt to clear claims, with some libraries and distributors re-applying the claims once they’ve been cleared. I strongly advise to research a library before submitting to them, to avoid this situation from happening.

Here is my concern Alumno. It is tempting to up-load my catalog, but below is a video where P&G paid $1200 to license this track. (Notice the fee paid Envato). If I were to ADrev/ Content ID out this music, P&G would get quite annoyed if they were to get a take down notice or copyright infringement notice from YOUTUBE after they just paid $1200 for this track. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N6E5uiHbpU0&index=4&list=UUobrVwwjzyMIId5OoYh-UsQ Any thoughts on that issue…?

In situations like this, communication is key. From the outset, when a deal like this is made, explain that your music is fingerprinted for YouTube copyright purposes and ask the client to send over any links to their YouTube videos that feature your AdRev fingerprinted music.

It’s then just a case of you sending a quick email over to AdRev support to have any claims from appearing/removed on these videos. It’s only a couple of minutes of extra work for you and is always promptly completed. I’ve been doing this for over 2 years now, and have never had a single problem with it.

936 posts Where words leave off, music begins.
  • Elite Author
  • Sold between 50 000 and 100 000 dollars
  • Interviewed on the Envato Notes blog
  • Author had a File in an Envato Bundle
  • Referred between 500 and 999 users
  • Has been a member for 2-3 years
  • United Kingdom
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AlumoAudio says

Content id is owned by Youtube/Google https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/2797370?hl=en

Actually no. ContentID was developed and launched by AudioMicro Inc. The technology they developed is presumably licensed out to YouTube and other digital fingerprinting agencies. In fact, try visiting contentID.com and look what happens ;)

where did you see that Audiomicro own Adrev ?

Potentially contravening forum rules by posting the following image, but in the interest of setting the record straight so everyone is on the same page, here’s a grab from AudioMicro Inc’s website:

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936 posts Where words leave off, music begins.
  • Elite Author
  • Sold between 50 000 and 100 000 dollars
  • Interviewed on the Envato Notes blog
  • Author had a File in an Envato Bundle
  • Referred between 500 and 999 users
  • Has been a member for 2-3 years
  • United Kingdom
+1 more
AlumoAudio says

It must be the interest of youtube to get all the quality and license cleared content to sell the advertising aren’t they.

I just think that Google/YT want to minimise any opportunities that their advertising can be removed. And this would include linking off to promote RF sites. They absolutely thrive on unlicensed music being uploaded to YouTube.

Users can remove that advertising, whether they’re monetizing their videos or not, with a license certificate. Imagine videos with massive views did this. Google/YT surely lose out.

As testament to this, Google/YT have now even rolled out their own (free!) music library in an attempt to undercut the RF libraries. Luckily right now the music on it is bloody awful, but that could always change!

936 posts Where words leave off, music begins.
  • Elite Author
  • Sold between 50 000 and 100 000 dollars
  • Interviewed on the Envato Notes blog
  • Author had a File in an Envato Bundle
  • Referred between 500 and 999 users
  • Has been a member for 2-3 years
  • United Kingdom
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AlumoAudio says


Glad to have helped.

Matt,

Did I understand you correctly in stating that AdRev represents the largest percentage of your overall income as an artist?

Paul

As it stands, yes it does. This is simply because my music landed on a plethora of very popular videos with monstrous view counts. And all ‘lifted’ from another source or video I must add.

But earnings fluctuate wildly, for a whole host of reasons. The main reason is that once-popular videos, become less popular over time. As their ‘watch time’ drops, YouTube will lower their ranking in search, prioritising newer or more relevant videos. Also, some videos may be taken down by the uploader or even removed by a third party, as they contained unauthorised music by another composer or copyright owner!

936 posts Where words leave off, music begins.
  • Elite Author
  • Sold between 50 000 and 100 000 dollars
  • Interviewed on the Envato Notes blog
  • Author had a File in an Envato Bundle
  • Referred between 500 and 999 users
  • Has been a member for 2-3 years
  • United Kingdom
+1 more
AlumoAudio says

Hi Kirk,

This was something I came across when I first started my channel, and found it quite curious why they weren’t allowing us to add our own merch links. The way I see it is that YouTube would’ve decided to leave certain sites, such as RF marketplaces off of their approved merch list, simply because it’s a business model that potentially conflicts with their very own business model.

You have to remember that YouTube (which of course owned by Google) rely purely on advertising revenue. When licensed music is used on YouTube, the user has the power and opportunity to remove that very advertising that supports YT/Google in the first place. It’s a conflict of interest.

The companies outlined in their list of approved retailers wouldn’t necessarily have any real impact on taking away from Google’s business. This is why, unfortunately, we have to make do with adding manual links into our descriptions. However, it’s worth adding an annotation at some point during the video to remind the viewer to check the video description for full licensing details. That’s what’s been working for me anyway!

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