Posts by AndySlatter

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AndySlatter Envato team says
Thanks YanD, that’s kind of what I thought, so isn’t the issue that if you want to broadcast music you should have the appropriate license? If a piece of music is broadcasted and the creator is non PRS registered, the PRS still collect a set license fee from the broadcaster it’s just that non of it will get to the musician. I was under the impression that the PRS uses cue sheets to work out what share of the collective pot a registered member is entitled to based on airplay etc rather than to work out how much to charge the broadcaster. I admit that I’m not sure how it all works, and now I’m wondering what royalty free actually means! But I don’t think that anyone should be at a disadvantage because they are a member of a PRS .
Not entirely, PRS will only require a license if the broadcaster broadcasts music that is PRS registered. They CANNOT issue a license for music that they do not represent. But you are correct if a broadcaster is paying a blanket license because they use PRS controlled music and then they also use (alongside the prs registered music) NON PRS music they will still issue the same license. In other words the broadcaster quite unfairly pays for everything. In this perculiar instance the money for those tracks that are non prs registered goes into a pot and stays there and if no one collects it after a certain period of time, it get’s distributed amongst the high end artists….isn’t that cr*ppy! BUT you can get your hands on it if you have a publisher. That should be nice and confusing!!
I was under the impression that the PRS uses cue sheets to work out what share of the collective pot a registered member is entitled to based on airplay etc rather than to work out how much to charge the broadcaster.
Your right that is how it works, the production house should fill out the cue sheet or inform the broadcaster of the creative talents so that PRS knows how to distribute the money. This is where most PRS money fails to reach the composer as cue sheets are not filed every time due to laziness so the composer misses out. Sad but true.
I’m wondering what royalty free actually means! But I don’t think that anyone should be at a disadvantage because they are a member of a PRS .
It’s not a very accurate term I’m afraid. The origins of this term and a more correct term would be more like ‘sync fee free music’ (just trips of the tongue!) as it was originally designed for production houses to be able to sync music to visuals without payingt high fees. It’s free of royalties for production houses. A composer can opt out of being MCPS registered but remain PRS registered. Unless it’s totally non prs then it’s free for everyone (unless they already pay a blanket license to PRS LOL !) Don’t forget that MCPS exists for ‘Production Music’ which a similar thing but the prices are higher than royalty free music because royalty free music had evolved and prices have been steadily pushed through the floor….next step free yippee!! oh hang…that means that no composer get’s any money…boooooo BTW it’s a whole different ball park for different countries just confuse things more. In my opinion the best thing to be if you are selling truely royalty free music is not to be registered with any of the PRO ’s that way your clients know exactly where they stand (which I think is the point of this thread). I hope that explains some of it, please correct me if I have made any mistakes in my explanation.

Can you repeat that please?

:)

No seriously, cheers, I think I understand :) . But it is just in the case of broadcasting yes? so if someone is broadcasting something then they should be paying a license. However, if they are just using some royalty free music as part of some other creation, wether it be drum loop as part of their own original track, or a music track as part of a film, they don’t have to pay anything else, in the first case the drum loop becomes a part of their own creation, in the second case, if the film is being broadcast the broadcaster will have a license anyway. Is this right?

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AndySlatter Envato team says

Hi Stuart,welcome:)

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AndySlatter Envato team says
@slats Here’s a typical breakdown (I will use the UK PRO – PRS for example): Normally in the royalty free music world a composer who is registered with PRS can waive the rights to MCPS (the mechanical rights, synchronisation fees) so ‘producers’ can synchronise the music into their productions without paying any extra fees. But PRS will usually still control the performance rights. Now normally this is not an issue as most (not all) broadcasters will be paying a yearly blanket license fee to PRS which coves the usage. No problem there then. Even Youtube pay PRS a fee, well until recently when PRS wanted to charge a lot more and Youtube have refused and as a consequence more vids are being pulled – : “prs vs youtube” : http://www.youtube.com/blog?gl=GB&hl=en-GB&entry=UaUSnLJ1wWE The real issue comes into play when an individual/company broadcasts the music themselves, this can include things like music on hold, in-store music and pretty much anywhere where the music is heard by a public audience (you know broadcasting!). Remember if that person is braodcasting a piece of PRS owned music PRS does have a right to charge a license for that music. Unless of course the composer has a deal in place with PRS that they are allowed to let others sub license their music. Hope that helps

Thanks YanD, that’s kind of what I thought, so isn’t the issue that if you want to broadcast music you should have the appropriate license? If a piece of music is broadcasted and the creator is non PRS registered, the PRS still collect a set license fee from the broadcaster it’s just that non of it will get to the musician. I was under the impression that the PRS uses cue sheets to work out what share of the collective pot a registered member is entitled to based on airplay etc rather than to work out how much to charge the broadcaster. I admit that I’m not sure how it all works, and now I’m wondering what royalty free actually means! But I don’t think that anyone should be at a disadvantage because they are a member of a PRS .

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AndySlatter Envato team says

Can anyone clarify all of this ( I am not a prs member btw :) )

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AndySlatter Envato team says
@Slats: Yes, the PRS would try to get the money from me – that’s all this is about ;) I just want to be sure that I don’t have to pay anything else except what I’m paying here. So I hope we don’t have any PRS members here!?

Would the PRS get any money from you just in the form of any license fees that you should be paying to them for being a broadcaster though?

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AndySlatter Envato team says

Hi all, I’m now reviewing Cubase source files, so I just wanted to try to encourage all the Cubase users to get uploading some quality source files : http://audiojungle.net/upload/help?type=source-files

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AndySlatter Envato team says

Hi Decarto, welcome, you have some great work, I’m sure you will do well here! Best wishes,

Slats

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AndySlatter Envato team says

As far as I’m aware, nobody would have to pay any additional fees, if an artist is registered with a PRS then he can collect any performance royalties he is due from the PRS .

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AndySlatter Envato team says
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AndySlatter Envato team says

Congrats Emmet and Adrien, you guys deserve it!

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