Posts by blabus

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blabus says
There’s not really anything hard about it. It’s just a matter of making sure content is accessible and displayed appropriately, which can easily be done with CSS and/or noscript tags. :)

It may not be hard, but it’s a considerable amount of extra work (again, not for primarily CSS -based designs with a slider or two, but for entire sites based off of Javascript, such as vCards and the like).

So let browser companies attract users to upgrade by themself. You just do your job – that’s why it’s well paid.

That’s a personal decision for every developer. You might take that route. I, on the other hand, would rather actively work to push adoption of new technologies, instead of just sitting back and saying “Meh, let someone else fix the real issue- I’ll just build workarounds and hacks.”

And I wouldn’t put too much faith in the browser companies- look how long it’s taken for Microsoft to kill IE6 .

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blabus says
The support questions of “Why doesn’t the site look good when Javascript isn’t enabled” (or to that calibre) would add further work.

Not if there was a clearly visible disclaimer to inform them that the item requires Javascript.

As mentioned previously – I’m not sure why this has become a debate. It’s a now a requirement, as decree by jremick. Done and dusted :D Suck it up, princesses! :winktongue:

I think it’s perfectly valid to discuss the merits of decisions made that affect all of us as authors. Envato isn’t perfect, just like every other company and person in this world. Questioning decisions is what keeps things moving in the best direction for everyone.

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blabus says
From the pros on JS fallbacks. ;)

I don’t care if the guy invented Javascript himself. The fact is that we as developers, being on the cutting edge, need to be pushing the web forward, not doing extra work to ensure the opposite.

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blabus says
I’ve said nothing about writing entire alternate versions of those types of sites.
If the template becomes ridiculously lengthy when JS is not available, that’s entirely okay.

Sure, maybe you don’t literally need to rewrite the entire template from scratch, but for many of the vCard-type and other JS-heavy sites, it’s hardly a trivial amount of work.

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blabus says
I don’t think that’s the correct approach to the situation. #1 – JavaScript, as I believe Chris Coyier stated, is a hack of sorts (it’s supplemental, not core). IMO that means it’s not something that should ever be entirely relied upon. #2 – The practice of quality web development ensures accessibility. So, this isn’t holding back the web, this is a matter of professional coding.

Saying that Javascript is a hack is too broad and a little ridiculous. Can it be used as a hack? Absolutely, and it is, far too often. Javascript should never be used for anything that can be accomplished with CSS /HTML alone. However, the state and complexity of websites is advancing rapidly. Users are starting to expect far more responsive, seamless and fluid experiences, and as the line between traditional websites and web applications continues to blur, Javascript is going to become more and more of a necessity, and we as developers should be doing all we can right now to educate and prepare users for the future.

Now, for a simple slider on an otherwise static page? I agree, a fallback should be provided (for now- remember, non-technical users are stubborn. We need to give them a firm push to encourage them to keep up with technology). But for sites like vCards and others that use non-standard layouts and navigational structures, we should not be writing entire alternate versions of those sites just so that users without Javascript enabled can view them in more or less the same state. As I said before- what, then, gives them any incentive to utilize newer technologies?

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blabus says
If the template becomes ridiculously lengthy when JS is not available, that’s entirely okay. The point, though, is that the content is accessible by the visitor (not just the search engine). If the visitor doesn’t like the length or lack of enhancements, they can choose to do something about their lack of JS. ;)

This is what is holding back the web. It’s as bad as back when authors had to include IE6 support- we are the problem, not the users. If the user doesn’t see a noticeable flaw in the presentation of the site (such as not being able to see it at all), that’s what will cause them to start enabling javascript, upgrade their browsers, etc… (excluding corporate users- that’s just a completely backwards group that will never keep up with current technologies).

As long as we spend the time to write excessive extra code so that users have as similar an experience as possible, we give them no incentive whatsoever to keep up to date with newer technologies.

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blabus says

Been messing around with a new idea for a template (link below). Any advice, comments, etc. are appreciated! I realize it’s a very limited image, but hopefully you can kinda get the direction I’m going in.

http://www.5byfive.net/mockup.png

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blabus says

[Rushes to take screenshots before thread is deleted]

Yep, this one’s a keeper.

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blabus says

Yeah the function I wrote is not in itself a member of any objects. A possible solution would be to loop through each h2 element, pass its html into the function, and then set its html to the returned value of the function.

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blabus says

Maybe something like this? :

function ShortenString(str) {
     return str.substr(0,20) + "...";
}
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