Posts by greenshady

158 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has referred 50+ members
  • Has sold $1,000+ on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
+1 more
greenshady says

There are a few things I really hated about it when I first got it:

  • The new startup “apps” screen. I just want to go to the desktop.
  • The charms bar. Every time I slide my cursor to the edge of the screen, it pulls it up.
  • I had to go through and change all the default media programs.
  • No start/windows button on the desktop, but you can install a program to fix that.

It took me a couple of weeks to adjust and get things to my liking. Other than that, I love it just as much as any other Windows. The biggest improvement to me seems to be speed.

158 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has referred 50+ members
  • Has sold $1,000+ on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
+1 more
greenshady says

Custom post types is one of the main reasons why WordPress has grown so much and you could almost do anything with them – so why not use them? I don’t see the problem.

I love post types. I’m the guy who wrote one of the most popular post type tutorials on the Web. I wrote the chapter on them in one of the most popular WordPress development books around. It’s rare to find someone who loves post types and uses them for various functionalities than me.

However, post types were never (and still are not) intended to be registered within themes.

The “problem” that you don’t see is that themes should not define the generation of user content. They’re intended to define the presentation of user content.

When the theme defines the generation of that content, you get what we call the “lock-in effect,” which means that the user cannot change their design (i.e., theme) without losing their content. If you don’t see a problem with that, there’s no point in continuing this conversation.

WordPress is really good about separating these things out. That’s why we have separate plugin and theme systems. Themes are separate from plugins so that users can change their design without losing any of the important stuff like their content.


I see a theme as a platform to also create functionality, not only design.

That’s not what themes are for. Themes are for defining the presentation of user content. That’s their purpose within the scope of the WordPress platform. It’s not a matter of opinion. That’s simply what themes are.

158 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has referred 50+ members
  • Has sold $1,000+ on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
+1 more
greenshady says
Use this plugin to only create the image sizes that you actually use: http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/dynamic-image-resizer/
158 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has referred 50+ members
  • Has sold $1,000+ on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
+1 more
greenshady says

Theme framework is a fairly broad term. Here’s a simple explanation of what it means: http://codex.wordpress.org/Theme_Frameworks

Generally, frameworks are for streamlining your code and cutting back on writing the same code over and over again. They also usually try to take some more complex things and simplify them.

158 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has referred 50+ members
  • Has sold $1,000+ on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
+1 more
greenshady says


I’ve had more users over the past 6 months from ThemeForest come to me with the “missing stylesheet” question than I’ve had over the past 7 years of making WordPress themes.
That kind of makes it sound like it’s a lot. But I assume that number is 5 at most, unless your theme was very popular with first time customers on Themeforest.

Considering that my themes have seen millions of downloads over the years, 5 would be a lot in comparison when looking at the small number of downloads of my theme here. The point is that users should have the theme in the format that they expect. Five users who can’t figure out how to install the theme is 5 users too many.

The exact number is actually 9 (number of emails I have about this issue). So, 92 downloads with 9 people who can’t figure out how to install the theme versus millions of downloads with fewer than 5 people who can’t figure it out.

158 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has referred 50+ members
  • Has sold $1,000+ on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
+1 more
greenshady says

Just add a completely separate download link to get the theme itself and make it more prominent than the full package download. WordPress users expect to download a ZIP file that they simply upload via the WordPress admin. This is a community standard and ThemeForest doesn’t follow this.

There shouldn’t be a need for a FAQ or crazy regular expressions on the forum posting form. Just do it like everyone else in the WordPress community.

I’ve had more users over the past 6 months from ThemeForest come to me with the “missing stylesheet” question than I’ve had over the past 7 years of making WordPress themes.

158 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has referred 50+ members
  • Has sold $1,000+ on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
+1 more
greenshady says

You shouldn’t split the profit. The obvious major difference is the ongoing support. A good design can take just as long, if not longer, to put together than the code. The code should be easy for any experienced developer (I’m speaking from a WordPress theme dev standpoint here). If it was just a one-off job, a fair split would be 50/50. But, since the developer will be continuing to update and provide support, it should just be a flat fee for the designer’s work. There’s simply no way to determine what percentage each person is putting into it because you can’t predict the future.

158 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has referred 50+ members
  • Has sold $1,000+ on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
+1 more
greenshady says

You can make the code more readable, but I don’t see any reason it should’ve been rejected based on that file.

158 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has referred 50+ members
  • Has sold $1,000+ on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
+1 more
greenshady says

I’ll have to agree with FinalDestiny. I just can’t find any positive points in this theme, areas where you could build upon. As it stands, you just need to start this design over from scratch.

158 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has referred 50+ members
  • Has sold $1,000+ on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
+1 more
greenshady says

Here’s a few tutorials to get you started.

I just wanted to point out that Create a Settings Page For Your WordPress Theme and Extended WordPress Settings API Tutorial have major issues and should not be considered good examples of theme settings pages.

The other tutorials look pretty solid though based on a quick look-through.

by
by
by
by
by
by