Posts by greenshady

158 posts
    Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years Has referred 50+ members Has sold $1,000+ on Envato Market Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
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greenshady says



I really don’t get Wordpress point of view, so they want great plugins but that authors give for free? We need to make a living in the end of the day :P
Just to clarify: When they talk about “free”, they’re talking about freedom, not price.
Yes that’s absolutely true, but it’s also freedom to copy our work and resell or share it for free.

I believe I covered that when I wrote “freedom.”

158 posts
    Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years Has referred 50+ members Has sold $1,000+ on Envato Market Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
+1 more
greenshady says

I really don’t get Wordpress point of view, so they want great plugins but that authors give for free? We need to make a living in the end of the day :P

Just to clarify: When they talk about “free”, they’re talking about freedom, not price.

158 posts
    Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years Has referred 50+ members Has sold $1,000+ on Envato Market Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
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greenshady says

My thoughts exactly. A theme should look like a simple wordpress blog out of the box. Which is why I’m thinking – a theme should function as a theme. When you want that portfolio feature, you enable that Custom Post Type plugin, and the theme has everything in place for it to display. When you want a map, you enable a plugin, and the theme displays the map properly as well, etc. But it seems that it isn’t the way most authors build their themes.

Actually, it’s how we do it in the rest of the WordPress community. You’re not even allowed to add those things in a theme on WordPress.org. It wouldn’t make it through the review process. And, most theme companies realize the value of code reuse and have moved away from putting everything in individual themes.

I often get frustrated with some of the things I see coming from ThemeForest though. This is why you’ll find me here preaching on the forums sometimes. :) This has improved vastly over the past year or so though. I think as more authors here change methods, others will follow suit.

158 posts
    Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years Has referred 50+ members Has sold $1,000+ on Envato Market Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
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greenshady says

But this means that I have to rely on the buyer to install the Portfolio plugin. Furthermore, I recently saw somewhere around here a note from Envato, that authors shouldn’t advertise that the theme contains a feature, if the feature is a plugin. In my (ultimate) goal, this would mean, that I could present my themes just as a plain-blog theme, because the custom functionality would rely on Plugins.

Don’t advertise a plugin as a theme feature. Be up front about the feature and make sure users know to install the plugin. You should definitely show off the use of the plugin in your theme demo though.

Treat it as if you were building a BuddyPress or bbPress theme. You don’t advertise your theme as having those features built in. You advertise it as supporting those particular plugins.

Would it be okay for me to require 9 different plugins from the user for the theme to function properly ?

It’s never okay for a theme to require any plugin to function properly. A theme should work out of the box with zero plugins installed. However, certain theme features can certainly require the use of a plugin.

158 posts
    Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years Has referred 50+ members Has sold $1,000+ on Envato Market Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
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greenshady says

I also have one for Justin / greenshady: Do you ever get woo themes being submitted to Wordpress.org? If I sold themes here that were 100% GPL, and someone submitted it to .org, would you guys catch it? If I saw my theme, or one which was 90% my theme on there, could I have it removed?

I’m not sure if we’ve ever had a commercial theme submitted like that. We get a lot of popular free themes copied. We still want original work though and wouldn’t allow someone to copy/paste themes.

Would we catch it? Absolutely. If the theme author gives proper copyright notices with the code, we’d see it automatically as a copied theme. If not…

Would we remove it if it got past the review process? Absolutely. If the theme author didn’t give the proper copyright notices with the code and you notified us of it, it’d be taken down as soon as possible. You’d even have a valid legal case against them if you wanted to pursue that.

See, that’s the thing about “copycats”. They don’t want anyone to know they copied, so they remove the copyright notices from the code.

Let’s say that a we have someone legitimately using the code to build from. As long as there’s enough significant changes to warrant a new theme, I don’t see anything wrong with that. As a theme author myself, I even encourage it. It’s always led to extra business for me.

As I said either in this thread or elsewhere, if you don’t want people copying, modifying, or distributing your work, an open-source license isn’t really for you. I know everyone has a different take on this, but if you’re going to go GPL, you definitely have to shift your thinking. You must be genuinely okay with people doing these things.

And, to just give you an example of how strict we are, I just rejected a theme that Automattic (yes, the company that runs WordPress.com) submitted for a missing copyright notice. No one gets special treatment.

I don’t want to speak for the entire Theme Review Team though because we’re a diverse group of people who argue every day about what’s best for the WordPress.org repository. I encourage anyone who has general questions about theme dev, want to be involved in the process, or simply learn more about making better themes to join the mailing list: http://lists.wordpress.org/mailman/listinfo/theme-reviewers
158 posts
    Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years Has referred 50+ members Has sold $1,000+ on Envato Market Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
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greenshady says




No, he didn’t call you [software] “pirates” earlier either. He was merely likening what we all do to pirates and pointing out that we can do it legally.

is this irony?

Because comparing someone with a pirate is like calling him a pirate.

No, there’s a difference. I’m more than happy to discuss the nuances of the English language with you off topic. I have a B.A. in English if you need my credentials.


@greenshady Nice attempt scrambling to do damage control. If caldazar wanted to clarify his situation, he had every opportunity to do so. Surely he is capable of this without your assistance!
He didn’t have a reason to clarify anything. It’s not his fault that other people were taking his words out of context.

Really? Than what is this:

Well, “referrals = giving back” is pretty much the pirate’s top argument. While this is true and should be part of a venture’s strategic considerations, saying that you’d owe pirates anything, be it an explanation for how you use your own software, would be quite bold methinks.

And this:

Technically you’re doing exactly the same as pirates, except it’s explicitly allowed. Why? Because WordPress gave you the permission as a gift out of the goodness of their hearts, before Envato even existed.

Please feel free to waste a bit more of your time and reveal us the sacral meaning of it;)

As I wrote earlier, I’ll be more than happy to discuss the English language in another topic. It’s obvious that some of you either don’t grasp what was written or want to be argumentative for the sake of being argumentative.

158 posts
    Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years Has referred 50+ members Has sold $1,000+ on Envato Market Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
+1 more
greenshady says


No, he didn’t call you [software] “pirates” earlier either. He was merely likening what we all do to pirates and pointing out that we can do it legally.

is this irony?

Because comparing someone with a pirate is like calling him a pirate.

No, there’s a difference. I’m more than happy to discuss the nuances of the English language with you off topic. I have a B.A. in English if you need my credentials.


@greenshady Nice attempt scrambling to do damage control. If caldazar wanted to clarify his situation, he had every opportunity to do so. Surely he is capable of this without your assistance!

He didn’t have a reason to clarify anything. It’s not his fault that other people were taking his words out of context.

158 posts
    Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years Has referred 50+ members Has sold $1,000+ on Envato Market Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
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greenshady says

Caldazar said he doesn’t want to try to walk on eggs in this public discourse. Frankly, no one should have to. It was not an insult to anyone.

I’ve seen several of you take what he has said completely and utterly out of context and assume he’s insulting you in some way. I understand that not all of you are native English speakers, and that’s okay. However, he hasn’t been trying to insult you.

No, he didn’t call you [software] “pirates” earlier either. He was merely likening what we all do to pirates and pointing out that we can do it legally.

It seems to me that several of you are cherry-picking specific phrases and bashing him for having a different opinion than you. It’s either that or you don’t understand what he’s saying. I only hope it’s the latter.

Please discuss the points at hand.

158 posts
    Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years Has referred 50+ members Has sold $1,000+ on Envato Market Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
+1 more
greenshady says
158 posts
    Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years Has referred 50+ members Has sold $1,000+ on Envato Market Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
+1 more
greenshady says
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