Posts by AlumoAudio

1374 posts Where words leave off, music begins.
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Had an item that was trending
  • Became a Top 20 Author of the Month
+9 more
AlumoAudio
says

“Thank you for your interest in YouTube’s Content ID. It appears that you applied previously and were not accepted. Our program is designed for exclusive rights holders whose content appears on YouTube. If you would like us to reconsider your request, you may reapply after Jun 15, 2015. Please note that you may still use the copyright notification web form or apply for the Content Verification Program, which may be better suited for your current needs.”

where is their customer service when you REALLY need it

looks like I have to wait a long time until I can use this feature :(

Am I correct in thinking you applied to YouTube’s ContentID system directly? If so, that probably explains why you were rejected, as this is generally reserved for very large publishing companies, networks or catalogues, especially those that fall outside of the royalty free domain such as large Creative Commons libraries.

For independent RF composers in our position, it’s always recommended to go via a partner system such as AdRev, Audiam or TuneCore as these submit the music into the ContentID system on our behalf, yet happily accept and manage smaller, royalty free catalogues owned by individuals. Hope that throws some light on it anyway.

1374 posts Where words leave off, music begins.
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Had an item that was trending
  • Became a Top 20 Author of the Month
+9 more
AlumoAudio
says


YouTube are getting very strict with this now, so users are now having to show proof of authorization on third party material as standard (regardless of where they got their music from) if they want claims removed or wish to monetize their channel. Things have changed greatly in just the last year or so, and that’s just how YouTube is operating these days. No way around it.

So it’s not just the royalty free stuff getting tagged. It’s all third-party material.
Not sure if I’m misunderstanding something here. Am I to understand that now YouTube is moving to flag any and all videos using third-party music (which I assume means non-YouTube library music) to prove licensing rights, including those music tracks not even registered with Content-ID services like AdRev?

Worry not PZ, looking back at my original statement there, I can see it was misleading.

What I was referring to was YouTube reserving the right to ask to see authorization/documentation when users attempt to activate monetization on their videos that contain third party material (either in the form of licenses or written permission, as explained here on YouTube’s official help video: http://youtu.be/L7a9IIIeqSo), which they now seem to be doing pretty routinely.

MorningLightMusic was referring to the proliferation of top tier music libraries that are now tracking their composer’s material as standard on YouTube. Just by visiting the AdRev site, it’s possible to see a couple of these libraries that have now chosen to partner with AdRev, as acting administrators. The point being, even users of the most premium, licensable music available, are now required to show proof of licensing, when using the music on YouTube.

1374 posts Where words leave off, music begins.
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Had an item that was trending
  • Became a Top 20 Author of the Month
+9 more
AlumoAudio
says

I already registered 14 tracks with this service but i still can’t figure out what is the difference between YTkey and ContentID and when i do search at the pages, the only thing i see is “How it works” nothing in here, look at the FAQ nothing too, did i miss something?

Ok, so submitting your music via AdRev’s ContentID tab just ingests your music into the YouTube ContentID system, as normal, to be tracked across YouTube. Any revenue earned is via the on-video ads on YouTube videos that contain your music.

With YT Music Key, revenue is earned via a proportion of subscription fees from paying YT Music Key service customers.

When someone signs up to this service, the user can watch music videos on YouTube without seeing any on-screen advertising and has access to music streaming via Google Play Music (Google’s version of Spotify).

AdRev have added the option for artists to add their full ‘albums’, including artwork, so these can be placed within the service and artwork shown on devices when played. For the most part, I shouldn’t imagine many royalty free composers using this option, but it’s there if we need it!

Edit: @Mike Just got there before me! And a much less long winded answer than mine! lol :)

1374 posts Where words leave off, music begins.
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Had an item that was trending
  • Became a Top 20 Author of the Month
+9 more
AlumoAudio
says

Not all customers ready to have ANY problems with proving ANY claims.

YouTube are getting very strict with this now, so users are now having to show proof of authorization on third party material as standard (regardless of where they got their music from) if they want claims removed or wish to monetize their channel. Things have changed greatly in just the last year or so, and that’s just how YouTube is operating these days. No way around it.

This is personal decision to participate or not in ContentID. May be when my sales will be closer to mighty 5000-10000 i will consider AdRev seriously. Not now.

By that logic, you’ll be getting more enquiries then, so maybe better to start whilst you have less music on YouTube? It’s the perfect time to draft up premade responses, get to know how to quickly deal with enquiries and understand the process and system inside out, before more people are using your music. Seems like common sense to me.

Some real example. one of my customers, who make video for Brietling (elite Swiss watches manufacturer) was shocked when all corporate videos, uploaded on Youtube was banned by AdRev.

Banned by AdRev?! They have no authority or ability to do that. All they do is administer our music. The only parties that can issue ‘video takedowns’ is you, the copyright holder of the third party content or YouTube themselves (usually for containing claimed content by another claimant other than yourself). Seems there may have been a misunderstanding somewhere down the line.

Either way, you should always contact AdRev support immediately when something like this arises, to ask for that channel to be whitelisted and all claims removed. They usually do this within a matter of hours.

1374 posts Where words leave off, music begins.
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Had an item that was trending
  • Became a Top 20 Author of the Month
+9 more
AlumoAudio
says

Not exactly. I have some really serious problems with my clients about Adrev. At least now i decided NOT to submit any track to Adrev. Whole system in premature state.

What kind of problems Leon?

It still baffles me when I hear about things like this – yet I don’t seem to have had any problems over the past 3 years, despite many tens of thousands of customers using my music on YouTube.

1374 posts Where words leave off, music begins.
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Had an item that was trending
  • Became a Top 20 Author of the Month
+9 more
AlumoAudio
says



AdRev has been such a hassle I plan on deleting my account, has anyone had experience closing there AdRev account? I do not see a delete button. Thanks, Mike
I’m quite curious to know what kind of hassle you’ve been having? Hassle with AdRev themselves or with customers asking about claims?
Its with customers complaining about the hassle of the copyright claim on youtube, and now with the new envato blog that was posted here: http://marketblog.envato.com/releases/youtube-content-id-policy-update-on-audiojungle/

Right. To be frank, YouTube and matters of copyright have been around since it’s inception, but like it or not, it’s only recently YouTube has greatly stepped up it’s requirement for it’s users to prove that they have the rights to use third party copyrighted material in their videos with Licenses/permission, before they will allow monetization. Users now have to address this anyway. Envato’s decision to make this clear to buyers is just them responding to that and authors AND buyers alike will need to adapt to these changes. That’s the evolution of the Internet I’m afraid.

Also, by removing your music from being tracked on YouTube will now leave it wide open to blatant theft and reuse without your permission or Licenses even being purchased as a result of you informing the user. Of course that’s entirely up to you, but not good business practice in my eyes and potentially adding to the continued devaluation of music as an asset. If you view having to engage with your customers as ‘a hassle’, then maybe selling via an online, public marketplaces isn’t the most ideal option.

Look at it this way, I’ve sold many tens of thousands of licenses of my AdRev registered music over the past few years, and never once felt having to speak with the very occasional buyer that asks about it, as being a hassle. Far from it. It’s an opportunity to directly communicate with a buyer and reassure them that as a genuine License holder, they can use it via the AdRev claim removal page and even eligible for their channel to be whitelisted. These buyers are often very grateful for my help, get a heightened sense of value and I’ve lost count of the times they have returned to purchase more Licenses from me, generating repeat business.

Just have a think about it, before throwing the baby out with the bathwater! :)

1374 posts Where words leave off, music begins.
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Had an item that was trending
  • Became a Top 20 Author of the Month
+9 more
AlumoAudio
says

AdRev has been such a hassle I plan on deleting my account, has anyone had experience closing there AdRev account? I do not see a delete button. Thanks, Mike

I’m quite curious to know what kind of hassle you’ve been having? Hassle with AdRev themselves or with customers asking about claims?

1374 posts Where words leave off, music begins.
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Had an item that was trending
  • Became a Top 20 Author of the Month
+9 more
AlumoAudio
says

Guys, purely out of curiosity – do you know whether it’s also possible to pull a track out of Adrev or in other words – cancel already submitted music? Thx.

Once you’ve submitted your music to AdRev, it’s administered for a term of one year, so you won’t be able to remove it before then. Take a look at their FAQ here (under the Rights section): http://cid.adrev.net/faq

1374 posts Where words leave off, music begins.
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Had an item that was trending
  • Became a Top 20 Author of the Month
+9 more
AlumoAudio
says

One more question, how do you manage the people who purchase a music license from you and then use it for a video on YouTube ? I saw your profile description and the advice to possible youtube claims… is that the way to do it?

Yes, what I have written on my profile is how I do it, as I’m registered with AdRev and those instructions apply to AdRev registered composers only. There’s a different process for composers registered with Audiam or TuneCore, for example.

But remember that AJ now has proper directions in place for buyers to see the full process and to clear claims from their videos using their purchased License(s).

If a buyer gets in touch with you directly about this via email, Twitter, etc, you can now simply direct them to Envato’s Buyers Guide to YouTube ContentID & Copyright Notices help article, and everything they need to know, including the claim removal process is found there.

1374 posts Where words leave off, music begins.
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Had an item that was trending
  • Became a Top 20 Author of the Month
+9 more
AlumoAudio
says

I don’t understand, should I register my music in youtube to be able to track it or just I have to add the banner AJ provides on each item? How I register my music with YouTube Content ID? Thanks

Hey Rodrigo, to get your music registered and tracked on YouTube’s ContentID system, you have to submit it via a third party partner platform such as AdRev first. The tracks are checked and then ported over into ContentID. You then get access to a dashboard so you can track your music across YouTube.

Composers that are licensing their music here on AJ, that already have their tracks registered to ContentID (via AdRev, Audiam, TuneCore, etc) should use the banner and specify this in the ‘edit’ section of their items.

Hope that explains things! :)

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