Posts by CodingJack

5408 posts The Dude Abides
  • Located in United States
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
+9 more
CodingJack says

For me, I figure that 70% of whatever they sell the support for is infinitely more money for me than the 100% of the $0 that I current charge for lifetime support. Don’t get me wrong, I’d love to have 90% instead of 70%, but like I said, it’s more money than I’m charging now. Like I said in my previous reply on here, I’d still love to see an actual support system solution implemented here for that 30% cut that they take.

+1

I know lots of authors are comfortable with their own support systems, but when you look at this from a customer’s perspective it’s really a no-brainer in my opinion. For example, when a customer buys 10 items, they’re sent to 10 different support sites, where they have to create and keep track of 10 different logins, and then find and enter their purchase code information for all 10 sites.

5408 posts The Dude Abides
  • Located in United States
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
+9 more
CodingJack says

The power to never need sleep!

5408 posts The Dude Abides
  • Located in United States
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
+9 more
CodingJack says

Here’s the big question. When the SaaS customer contacts them for support do they send the customer to you?? :D

Congrats Unodor :) Definitely wish I was in your shoes!

5408 posts The Dude Abides
  • Located in United States
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
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CodingJack says

Wishing you the best Dan. Thanks for the great communication and improving the elite program :)

5408 posts The Dude Abides
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  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
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CodingJack says

doesn’t maintain and run a general WP theme/plugin forum

This is a great idea. What takes up most author’s time is the fact that most customers seeking support have very poor troubleshooting skills. So the public forum could exist for this specific purpose. Some examples:

  • Check to see if the customer is using the latest version of the plugin/theme, and provide information about how they can update.
  • Teach the customer how to identify conflicts (temporarily deactivate other plugins, switch to TwentyFourteen, etc.)
  • Remind customers that purging WP cache plugins often solves lots of issues.
  • Identify and communicate front-end console errors to the customer.
  • Identify and communicate broken HTML markup (often caused by custom filters).

So nothing specific to the actual product(s), but basic things that will teach customers how to troubleshoot their sites. Because the biggest support burden doesn’t come from the 10 customers who ask only 1 question. It comes from the 1 customer who asks 10. And it’s always the latter who has very poor troubleshooting skills.

5408 posts The Dude Abides
  • Located in United States
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
+9 more
CodingJack says
Also I doubt authors will implement a “kill switch” for users who “used all their tickets”.

On rare occasion it has to be done. My biggest concern is as of right now, authors don’t have any guidelines or tools for dealing with these situations.

5408 posts The Dude Abides
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  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
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CodingJack says


This is an important factor to consider when speaking of “bug fixes”. I think the goal of the document there is to keep it short and sweet (so people actually read it), but maybe we could link to a Wiki that expands on the definition of a “bug” and how it can be properly verified for both WordPress and non-WordPress items.
@CodingJack: interesting idea. Do you know if something like this exists out there already?

The general idea is to effectively communicate the difference between a bug and a usage error, and it would need to be specific for different product lines (CC jQuery plugin, WP Theme, etc.). Here’s an example:

I think I’ve found a bug in my CodeCanyon jQuery plugin but am not 100% sure. How can I verify this?

Download a fresh copy of the plugin’s source files (insert link to downloads page here), and test one of the html example files included with the product. If the bug doesn’t exist in the original source files, and only exists on your site, it means something went wrong with the implementation process. For example, if the item works “out of the box”, but doesn’t work once added to your site, something must have gone wrong somewhere when modifying the item’s content/settings and merging the item with your site.

In these cases, the best way to find out what went wrong is to start over from scratch, and test the item frequently as you customize/setup the item. This will allow you to identify what exact step caused the issue, giving you the proper insight as to whether the issue is something simple (url wasn’t written correctly, etc.), or if the issue is more serious (a settings option described in the item’s documentation simply doesn’t work).

5408 posts The Dude Abides
  • Located in United States
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
+9 more
CodingJack says

I think the paragraph “Fixes for bugs and reported issues with the item” should contain (at least for WordPress plugins) the mention that “Authors are required to fix bugs and reported issues” only if the plugin did not suffer major customizations from the buyer’s side. I had a couple of buyers who made some major customizations and improvements after they have bought one of my plugins and then they required bug fixes on their code, telling me that basically I have to provide support, since it’s my plugin.

This is an important factor to consider when speaking of “bug fixes”. I think the goal of the document there is to keep it short and sweet (so people actually read it), but maybe we could link to a Wiki that expands on the definition of a “bug” and how it can be properly verified for both WordPress and non-WordPress items.

5408 posts The Dude Abides
  • Located in United States
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
+9 more
CodingJack says

5. Avoid providing unnecessary refunds when buyer says I bought an HTML template thinking it was a WordPress theme. An author clearly states in his item title and details what the product is so it is buyer’s fault as he didn’t read the description. Wow, what a coincidence here

The problem is most of these cases are usually honest mistakes. We live in a “click first, read later” world now.

5408 posts The Dude Abides
  • Located in United States
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
+9 more
CodingJack says

Here are the main points that make this way better than before:

Authors with items on ThemeForest and CodeCanyon will be able to choose whether or not they support each item (on an item-by-item basis).
There will be no prescribed turnaround times but we want to give authors the ability to set expectations clearly with buyers. We’re still working on exactly how to do this but it will likely be in the form of a setting that authors show to buyers.

Yes authors who don’t “opt-in” will be at a disadvantage to competitors who do, but this isn’t really different than the current system, where all items have a “Support” tab which states whether the author provides support or not, and then if an author currently says they provide support, they’re expected to provide it (or otherwise would be participating in “false advertising” which isn’t currently allowed).

Yes Envato is going to set the cost for support, and also take a 30% cut. But authors now have the choice to not participate, whereas before, it was going to be mandatory across the board.

Things that still need to be ironed out:

1) Giving authors the ability to issue refunds automatically, for both the item purchase and any additional support packages purchased (solves the “help, I’ve been taken hostage by an unreasonable customer” situation).

2) How “Author Vacations” plays into everything. If an author is advertising and selling support, but then takes a 6 month vacation, obviously that isn’t going to fly, so some type of reasonable parameters need to be figured out.

3) What happens if an item is deleted by the author or by Envato. Do purchased support packages get refunded to the customer? And if so, will Envato issue a charge-back to the author for the loss?

So there’s still some important unanswered questions. But based on phase 2, I’m definitely optimistic.

Additionally, DOTonPAPER’s comment about customers not reading details is spot on. For the support forum I work with, we recently changed the forum’s homepage to prominently ask for some specific details about the customer’s environment to help us solve issues faster (simple things like “what browser and OS are you using”). And only 1% of all customers actually include the information we ask for. So some brainstorming needs to be done to figure out how we can effectively communicate support policies to buyers. Maybe the best solution for this is to send the buyer to a “purchase confirmation” page where they can review the support details and “accept the terms” before they’re allowed to actually make a purchase.

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