Posts by Crusader12

233 posts
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Crusader12
Envato team
says

Hey GravityDept, You have solid points, and the bottom line is that no system will be perfect for everyone. Before I go any further I need to clarify that I’m not representing Envato – but speaking as a seller.

With my suggestion I didn’t mean for all authors to stop providing updates or support on their items. I even mentioned that there would continue to be many serious authors like yourself that stand behind their items. The idea is to maintain our ability to deny support. I’ve always provided support on all of my items – and have always gone to great lengths when writing documentation as well. There are very valid reasons to deny support – which I’ve outlined in all of my docs as well. Some of these include suspected piracy of Envato items, rude buyers and requesting support outside of 6 months. For me, this is the most appropriate and “fair” way that I can manage support on my items… but it won’t work for everyone.

A lot of people are here because they want to sell GOODS, not SERVICES – which I think is where things really start to break down. You’re partially right about taking your car to a junk garage – they might screw things up. But Envato Studio – contrary to a junk garage – is full of professionals very much capable of coding through TF or CC items. While the author may be the best person to provide support for an item – there’s a whole community of other viable options, waiting to make a few bucks on the work that some authors don’t want to do.

So, while authors remain doing what they’re doing now – rather than expanding all of the marketplaces with special support requirements that would lock some into situations they’ve been trying to avoid in the first place – why not isolate item support to Envato Studio? It would fuel the community in a new way, allow authors to continue doing what they love and servicing their products how they see fit, and provide a new sense of support for buyers. This would also provide a more flexible support avenue in some instances such as buyer/author language barriers.

My main point of my previous post was that I was drawn here to sell PRODUCTS – which then lead into support and maintaining those products. Pretty sure we all came here for the first reason, and pretty sure not everyone agrees on the second.

233 posts
  • Made it to the Authors' Hall of Fame
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Crusader12
Envato team
says

What initially attracted me to the market was selling a product made once, multiple times. The implied idea behind that being only having to do the work once. I think it’s safe to say that many others were attracted for the same reason. Then updates and support comes in and suddenly that ‘work once’ model turns into an ongoing job – changing that model. Handling Updates and Support for an item brings up a handful of issues that are only indirectly related to the product itself. The warranty for a car shouldn’t necessarily be a reflection of the car itself. I think we need a solid distinction between services and goods. I started here to sell products, and get away from servicing clients. However, there’s a whole sister market for services with many capable developers that would probably love to make an income customizing and supporting plugins and themes. Seems like everyone would win and any support / update issues would at least be isolated to a single section of one market. Serious authors will continue to write clean code and keep their items current. [ speaking as an author ]

233 posts
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Crusader12
Envato team
says

Has there been any response to this?

233 posts
  • Made it to the Authors' Hall of Fame
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Crusader12
Envato team
says

CodeCanyon

233 posts
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Crusader12
Envato team
says

Awesome! Is this only open to games, or would game engines qualify as well?

233 posts
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Crusader12
Envato team
says

Hey InsectoDesign, I’ve moved this over for you :) To avoid this in the future, please make sure you’ve selected the correct category and subcategory when uploading items.

Very nice design btw :)

I’ll have to flag your comment now per forum policy :( and need to state to anyone else reading this that the appropriate thing to do should this happen to one of your items is to open a Support Ticket.

Thanks, and best of luck with sales!

233 posts
  • Made it to the Authors' Hall of Fame
  • Member of the Envato Team
  • Had an item featured on Envato Market
  • Contributed a free file of the month
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Crusader12
Envato team
says

It also depends on the type of design you’re doing as well. The format of the design should just be another tool at your disposal – the canvas of your painting. The size (standard, non-standard, large or small) should be considered based on your design and message more than on what is standardized. Presenting a design in portrait or landscape will affect the message.

The only real plus for sticking to standard sizes is saving money when it comes to printing – which is why I think it usually IS a good idea to include a 4×6 (seems to be the most common and cheapest for buyers to print and distribute) – but don’t get stuck in the 4×6 rut. Also keep in mind other factors that may limit your audience and possibly turn buyers away from your item.

Something else to consider is using unique sizes and/or special printing techniques. I’ve seen a few designs that deviate considerably from the standard print sizes, but the flyer category could use a some mixing up as far as sizes.

I rarely see flyers setup for die cutting, embossing or separations. Flyers don’t have to be square, and I’d love to see some crazy high-end flyers with incredible die cut options – for those buyers that want to invest in a decent print job.

Let your design dictate the format, but always try to include something practical.

233 posts
  • Made it to the Authors' Hall of Fame
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Crusader12
Envato team
says

Interesting discussion… and ironic how GIF has made a comeback.

This talks a bit about Twitter’s use of MP4s http://www.neowin.net/news/twitters-gifs-are-actually-mp4s

The 80% file size reduction is kind of impressive. Perhaps it’s just me, but it seems like a little overkill.

233 posts
  • Made it to the Authors' Hall of Fame
  • Member of the Envato Team
  • Had an item featured on Envato Market
  • Contributed a free file of the month
+13 more
Crusader12
Envato team
says

Now wouldn’t it be cool if we just had a random author day where everyone buys an item from 1 lucky person?

233 posts
  • Made it to the Authors' Hall of Fame
  • Member of the Envato Team
  • Had an item featured on Envato Market
  • Contributed a free file of the month
+13 more
Crusader12
Envato team
says

Congrats!

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