Posts by GravityDept

716 posts Magento Elite & Gravity Maker
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 4 years
+3 more
GravityDept says
716 posts Magento Elite & Gravity Maker
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 4 years
+3 more
GravityDept says

Does your USB key work? Mine was DOA. Not a big deal because they’re so cheap just wondering.

716 posts Magento Elite & Gravity Maker
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 4 years
+3 more
GravityDept says

Gosh guys! Travis can’t make a joke or a humanly mistake without everyone burning him at the stake? Even if he did by mistake press the disable button, tablets are damn annoying for me as well, and I spend time on my tablet on the community to help you guys out as much as I can and keep things on track! I’ve disabled / stickied / locked a few threads by mistake from a tablet myself in the past, but then made them visible back again after I’ve noticed my mistake. We’re all human!

It’s a human mistake if it were to happen and please, don’t tie Travis to a stake and set him on fire! If anyone here using a mobile or tablet NEVER pressed a link and hit something else by mistake, please, acuse away, else, understand that we’re trying our best to be around the forums ALL the time, and that may lead to some small issues when browsing from mobiles. Furthermore, account issues are top priority so disabling by mistake isn’t something that can go on unnoticed!

And please, if possible, keep the conversation on topic! :)

Don’t think anyone is blaming Travis personally. Mistakes happen. I’m blaming the system. For something serious like disabling an account it’s worth questioning why that there isn’t a confirmation like “Are you sure you want to disable this user?” because it freezes their income.

The fact that an errant tap can do that, and the author had to complain to make it noticed tells me those buttons are little time bombs. Just wait till this happens to a Power Elite and they lose $1k a day.

716 posts Magento Elite & Gravity Maker
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 4 years
+3 more
GravityDept says


Well, I’ve just had my account suspended (username was ThemeSpirit if anyone remembers it) I wasn’t an Author yet but was an active member of the community for a few years.

I think that was my fault! I’m working from the office this week and using my tablet. I think I pressed the wrong button and disabled your account by mistake. Stupid small tablet links! :D

My deep apologies! Your account in now re-enabled.

Is it really that easy for an admin’s mis-tap to disable an account that you don’t notice until the author says WTF?

716 posts Magento Elite & Gravity Maker
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 4 years
+3 more
GravityDept says

Now we reached an Elite status just in three months, but we are thinking not about new theme release, but on how to get out of here (TF) asap. We do not want to build a long lasting partnership with a company who allow that.

This. This. This. Is what many Elites are thinking over the last few months.

716 posts Magento Elite & Gravity Maker
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 4 years
+3 more
GravityDept says

That’s what package managers (like gem, npm, or composer) are for, but I doubt you’ll ever see that for WordPress and second for paid software. For open-source they make life a whole lot easier though.

716 posts Magento Elite & Gravity Maker
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 4 years
+3 more
GravityDept says

Matt Cutts has the answer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_MswMYk05tk

Exactly, what Google has said numerous times over the years: it doesn’t matter.

Going to sell direct, are we? Same here. And I’ll be using a subdomain.

716 posts Magento Elite & Gravity Maker
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 4 years
+3 more
GravityDept says

@ Leokoo — I’m all for bootstrapping and lean businesses. Platforms like Magento, WooCommerce, and Shopify can all get an ecommerce business off the ground and growing for next to no investment. It’s not true that (good) eCommerce consultants and agencies advocate for the most expensive solutions.

It’s about the right fit for each business. My point was the SMB market wouldn’t consider WooCommerce today because it makes no sense to invest highly in an add-on to a blog platform that frankenstein-ed into a CMS. That’s where a ground-up eCommerce platform becomes mandatory because it has the core APIs for integrations and features like customer segmentation / price rules that aren’t touched by shopping add-ons.

Magento’s core development has definitely not stalled, it’s accelerating but (rightly) focused on Magento 2: https://github.com/magento/magento2/commits/master

It wasn’t smooth after the eBay acquisition, but they’re on the right path now and making measurable progress month after month.

eCommerce or Magento specialized hosting always includes daily or even hourly backups that are automated. And their business is providing a full stack that’s PCI compliant. That’s why it doesn’t cost $5/month. The fact that WordPress isn’t (and never will be) PCI-DSS certified is a big red flag to anyone making eCommerce a significant part of their overall business strategy.

Sure you can get around PCI by using PayPal Express or another hosted payments flow, but redirecting off-site is not the best UX. The fact is WordPress and additionally WordPress hosting stacks are not engineered for passing a PCI-DSS audit.

That’s why micro-businesses are much better off using Shopify in my opinion. For the price of hosting you relieve all the management, security, upgrades, and hassle of starting a store to focus on the business not the technology.

WooCommerce (nor Magento) can compete with $15/mo for Shopify at that scale. But as revenue creeps up the cracks do show, and the need for a more extensible platform and enterprise-like integrations becomes apparent.

In the end, it’s the companies who make the right investments who succeed not those who bootstrap the hardest.

716 posts Magento Elite & Gravity Maker
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 4 years
+3 more
GravityDept says

@ Leokoo #1 — I don’t think it’s fair to say Tom misrepresented any data. Nor does every dataset have to reference every other dataset. BuiltWith certainly doesn’t. It’s your job to understand any analysis is not gospel, but a view into data. Tom’s work gives another view and I’m it’s available.

@ Leokoo #2 — What about eCommerce experts like moi? I consult with billion dollar eCommerce empires like eBay and some others I can’t name publicly. My work has been a cover story for Internet Retailer and I speak regularly at eCommerce conferences about multi-device design. I think it’s safe to say I have a solid grasp on the eCommerce space.

Small to medium sized business (SMB) means $5M to $25M in revenue. A company with 50-250 employees better be making at least that much. Anything smaller is a micro-business. The scale is defined by true enterprises conducting well north of that.

See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Small_and_medium-sized_enterprises

Many (many) Magento implementations transact millions per month. The customers WooCommerce serves aren’t small they’re microscopic by comparison. It’s a very different market, and Magento isn’t competing with them.

SMBs and enterprise businesses have ERP integrations, tax compliance and reporting, CRM integration, marketing platforms, CDNs, multi-channel sales, operations and fulfillment logistics, and much more than a simple online store.

Having said that, Magento’s open-source community is very deep and offers the robustness of enterprise-level software for extremely minimal investment. There are tons of micro businesses using Magento and growing without any hiccups. Just wait till a WooCommerce store gets audited for PCI-DSS compliance — hint, it will fail.

The features you’re saying WooCommerce does better with plugins exist in Magento out-of-box. And what you’re saying is wrong with Magento can go equally wrong with third-party plugins for WooCommerce, Shopify, or any platform. Building solid applications is not easy or cheap. Businesses invest differently depending on their scale and goals.

Magento isn’t expensive to maintain, it’s the right price. Many extensions have annual licensing and businesses love that. Why? Because it means they’ll be supporting the product next year. That’s good for both businesses and how they grow together. You’re even complaining that WooCommerce changed their licensing to be sustainable (god forbid, Envato wakes up and follows suit), which real businesses (honestly) see as a positive not a negative.

@ Leokoo #3 — Magento has eBay backing it, and a huge resource in eBay Enterprise for growing an SMB. These things aren’t obvious to small shops because it’s a different world.

Nobody chooses platforms based on how many products it can hold. Servers are all commoditized and dirt cheap. This doesn’t differentiate platforms. While you’re touting WooCommerce for doing the basics of online commerce with plugins, remember that’s the minimum to transact.

Magento and ultimately any platform is only as strong as its ecosystem. WordPress is primarily hobbyist-driven and Magento is professional-driven. Sure somebody can build you a WooCommerce store for $150. But nobody builds you a WooCommerce store for $500,000. People do that with Magento. Believe me there are plenty of reasons as I stated above why it’s a better market fit for serious businesses (particularly those who aim to not only compete but succeed in the SMB or enterprise market).

716 posts Magento Elite & Gravity Maker
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 4 years
+3 more
GravityDept says

@ imraansarwar —Growth is not a constant measure. WooCommerce is certainly growing in the top 0.1M to 1M sites, but Magento is crushing it in the 0 to 1K and 1k to 10k benchmarks. Not discounting WooCommerce for getting on the map in a big way, but it’s actually harder to displace enterprise products so that’s a big testament to Magento.

Also consider growth relative to revenue. I doubt there are many (if any) WooCommerce stores earning $1M revenue. It’s for kicking the tires not growing a business into the SMB space. That’s specifically what Magento was designed for.

WooCommerce and to a large extent Shopify are perfect for micro-businesses, but it’s really not fair to compare them by number of stores to enterprise platforms. There are simply fewer enterprise customers (but much higher value). Totally different market.

@ Leokoo — Tom is a friend. Have care how you speak. He does that research in his free time for the community. The signals he had available to test against in past years weren’t perfect, but it was a start. Spree for example has few signatures in its markup so it’s quite hard to detect. Many who use it re-implement the frontend in something totally different like Angular.

If you keep looking around the web you’ll see many reports that show varying slices of the Alexa index by platform. Some may be more accurate than others, but good luck proving it without doing the work yourself.

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