Posts by MeRuud

9 posts
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
MeRuud says

Thanks AdminDesigns,

I apologize I was not trying to make a technical comparison. What I am trying to say is that you should ask yourself how your average customer looks like, and then based on that stereotype in what group they would fall in regards to LESS vs Sass. I think you will find out that a big group of customers will not be technological advanced to even consider using Preprocessing languages. The other group, with more experience, will be advanced enough to use both and will have greater benefit using Sass.

Here another poll on Reddit (sorry have to read the comments): http://www.reddit.com/r/webdev/comments/24kcm0/poll_do_you_use_sass_or_less/

And doing a search-poll on Stackoverflow: Sass 5,133 results. Less 3,498 results. .

Hope this helps, would love to hear some feedback from other authors on this as well.

9 posts
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
MeRuud says

Short answer: Sass is better for a whole bunch of different reasons.

LESS is easier to read and easier to jump in for beginners, assuming they have no preprocessing experience. When your customers decide to preprocess their CSS it will be a lot easier* for them to start with LESS than to start with Sass. That being said, if your customers are serious about preprocessing they should have enough experience to handle both or at least able to jump in Sass with relative ease – the long term gain and possibilities of Sass are more than worth the initial learning curve. If you customer will only make small changes he/she might as well just skip the preprocessed files and jump in the postprocessed CSS instead.

That being said both have a lot of similar points and both still have some capability issues with CSS3 (eg. sprites, etc.). Sass’s companion Compass really gives a good hand here.

I think you should pick the one that fits best in your current development process (eg. LESS and Javascript vs Sass and Ruby), and what you are most familiar with. Also I think you should look at your average customer and see if they even heard of CSS preprocssing, if most of them are used to, for example, Wordpress and customization with childthemes you probably don’t even need to worry about them.

Small syntax comparison: https://gist.github.com/chriseppstein/674726. Market share polls http://css-tricks.com/poll-results-popularity-of-css-preprocessors/ -> LESS (23%) vs Sass/Scss (18%). http://blog.codepen.io/2013/04/08/statistics-on-preprocessor-usage/ -> Sass/Compass (80%) vs LESS (20%).

Hope this helps! Thanks,

*Here I mean ease of syntax, not necessarily ease of setting up and usage (eg. setting up the development environment, or converting to CSS).

9 posts
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
MeRuud says

Btw, we have decided to purchase two out of the 24 items from the Envato Marketplace – as they were just too good of a deal to miss out on.

Thanks again. And props to all the designers.

9 posts
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
MeRuud says

Thank you all for your replies.

I am not trying to start a discussion, just wanted to leave feedback. Which I assume is very important for you guys considering you are all exclusive sellers.

As for my understanding, the whole “accounting reasons” comes from a three year old thread and is incorrect. Those are not standard or required accounting practices (neither in the US, nor Australia), and gift cards are not the same as customer deposits. In regards to the other two points. I understand a minimum deposit – but I don’t understand why I can’t deposit $12, or $18 or whatever – there is no reason for ‘5’-numbering. As @charlie mentioned, most purchases are not like that and thus users will be forced to pay excess and leave a small amount in their accounts – (and no, accounting / taxation has nothing to do with this either). And again most importantly, the “Buy it now” button shouldn’t charge you extra – which I assume most agree with considering no comments have been made on this.

I am not claiming Envato is selfish, I am just merely saying that they are putting themselves first. You might want to consider that without you guys there is no Envato, however without Envato there are still a ton of options available for you.

I wish you guys all the best with your sales and hope this reaches you well, Thank you.

9 posts
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
MeRuud says

Is your balance on Paypal high enough?

9 posts
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
MeRuud says

Hello,

I would just like to leave a general message in regards to my experience on the website, hoping it might aid in the development of the Envato Marketplaces.

Recently I have been going through the different Envato Marketplaces a lot because I received a spur of new clients with a wide variety of requirements. I have never purchased anything here but was planning on purchasing a bulk load of themes and several other design files. The themes and other files available here are great and affordable, props to the designers.

However I have decided to delay and possible not pursue my purchases due to a couple of reasons. The biggest reason is the actual buying process and Envato’s stand on it.
  • It does not make any sense for the “Buy it now” to be more expensive, not from a marketing perspective, not from a ‘overhead’ perspective, and not from a consumer perspective. However it does seem to cover Paypals % commission from each payment, and Envato’s missing interest on deposits.
  • The $20 minimum and $10 increments are ridiculous, there is no reason for this either – except that it has benefits for Envato which also relate to the next point.
  • The “Deposits expire in a year” is a complete turn off. I have been looking online for this and found several offered explanations but all are from non-officials and are (legally/technically) incorrect. It is very odd not to find any other Australian E-Commerce sites doing this.

This seems to be a product of a somewhat monopolistic online presence into this market. Unfortunately the themes I found are by exclusive resellers and I won’t be able to find them somewhere else. This is not so much a sad thing for me as a buyer, as I’m confident I can find a similar design somewhere else, but I feel sorry for the designers that their biggest bottleneck in their sales process is also their only online exposure.

My image of Envato is one that put themselves first, not the buyer or the sellers – which is the complete opposite of what a company with this business model should do.

Hope this reaches you well, Thanks.

9 posts
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
MeRuud says

The in-house designer just quit and removed everything? Sounds like he was fired. However either way, if he was an in-house designer it sounds like he illegally removed company files and materials, which you should be able to pursue. If I’m reading the original post wrong and you hired an external designer, who quit (or was fired), I assume you have/had a contract – it still seems illegal for him/her to remove these files. (I’m just assuming there were contracts in place considering the $30k budget).

I don’t recognize the theme, but if your looking for that theme and are going to start from scratch from that theme anyway you might as well look for another health care theme on the market? http://themeforest.net/search?category=wordpress&direction=desc&order_by=best-match&term=health+care&utf8=%E2%9C%93

I hope you are able to find your original theme, if not the market should help you out a lot.

9 posts
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
MeRuud says

Any theme with a portfolio section should get you started. I think you can find something fairly easily by typing “portfolio section” in the search box.

9 posts
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
MeRuud says

I haven’t looked at the code of the theme, but I really like the design. Very original. “Multi-purposity” shouldn’t be an issue, there is no way that could be the issue.

What LandonW mentioned in regards to not using enough WordPress features, seems ridiculous as well. That doesn’t seem something to quantify and is very subjective. A theme without any special features should still be able to be accepted, as many might desire this, just in a lower price range to make it comparable to a feature-filled theme. Your references example theme is a great proving point. (Also in regards to this you do seem to be using a sidebar with widgets.)

Only thing I could think of is a missing home page with an overview of blog post (eg, similar to your archive pages). – But again this is a very subjective qualification, which shouldn’t really be considered.

Silly that they don’t provide more structural feedback when rejecting themes.

Good luck!

by
by
by
by
by
by