Posts by MsTrends

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MsTrends says

More like FIXING by REMOVING the target feature :)

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MsTrends says

still looking.

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MsTrends says

Happy Ramadan to everyone :)

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MsTrends says

bump!

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MsTrends says

I also vote for placing Font Awesome in your theme/plugin and properly enqueueing it.

Using a CDN for Google Web fonts is one thing – if they don’t load, you have a system fallback.

If Font Awesome icons don’t load, you’ll get a bunch of unknown characters since they’re not in the standard unicode set.

Sidenote: loading jQuery from a CDN is your choice if you’re managing your own site (though then you have to manually keep it up to date), but if you are releasing a theme or plugin publicly you should NEVER do that – it would be very irresponsible (and also isn’t allowed by ThemeForest) :)

For jQuery in WP, i agree, using CDN version is bad practice as WP has built in jQuery library. But for HTML templates i think CDN version is better (for caching and other benefits). However, if you want to be on safe side you can always include local jQuery version as fallback. Same goes for CSS.

But yes, one can simply use local files for the sake of simplicity :)

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MsTrends says

I do not know whether the use of a CDN is ok in this case, what if the template you bought a few thousand times and CDN stop working? This is not a large file, it is better to have it locally.

The answer is same i think, what if google fonts api site goes down? as most of the templates/themes here use those fonts. Although, in this case file size is only 20 KB, its not much, it goes down to ones own choice. However, speaking generally, there are many advantages of using CDN version: Why should I use Google’s CDN for jQuery?

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MsTrends says

It’s simple to do without a plugin:

1) upload the css and font files to your theme folder

2) Add the CSS to WP head by using the enqueue_style function (link)

We can actually strip out step one by using CDN link to CSS file. e.g.

wp_enqueue_style('font-awesome', '//maxcdn.bootstrapcdn.com/font-awesome/4.1.0/css/font-awesome.min.css');
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MsTrends says

I really want to be a part of this community :superbashfulcute:

admin [AT] mstrends [DOT] com / Dribbble Profile

Thanks!

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MsTrends says

I don’t think its possible here on envato. However, you can withdraw money to different kind of accounts. e.g one withdraw to payoneer and second withdraw to paypal/skrill etc.

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MsTrends says


Clients need to have reason to buy “normal themes”

That’s a great point…if I am a restaurant who just needs a theme with a home, about, map, gallery, and a few menu pages, I should be steered toward a niche theme targeting restaurants (http://themeforest.net/search?utf8=%E2%9C%93&term=restaurant). Themes there are mostly $45 with a few priced at $40 and $55. If I do what most people do and go directly to the popular files list, I see mostly multipurpose themes that are overkill for what I need, but they are only $10 more and you get an impressive list of features like sliders, shortcodes, page builders, ecommerce, buddypress, and bundled plugins.

For an author, it makes sense to pack everything including the kitchen sink into a multipurpose theme and hope to hit the popular files list. It is much better than languishing in an unseen niche category with low sales. If you increased the prices on these multipurpose themes (e.g. start at $45 add $10 for ecommerce, $10 for page builder, $5 for buddypress, $2 for each bundled plugin, etc.), you would see $80-$100 for a multipurpose everything under the sun theme vs $45 for a niche theme. That would drive some people to just purchase a niche theme if that’s all they need.

+1 Multi-purpose theme prices should go up in order to niche + simple themes to survive in long run.

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