Posts by MusicBoxStudios

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MusicBoxStudios
says

Thanks for that music box studios. I will give that a try. Much appreciated.

No problem. Good luck

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MusicBoxStudios
says

iPhones don’t support downloading files from Safari. You need to download from a desktop or a laptop computer.

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MusicBoxStudios
says

I think I’ve heard about enough gloating.

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MusicBoxStudios
says

A measly 16 sales for June. 50% less than the month prior. I think it’s time to take my portfolio to another site. This is not paying off at all anymore.

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MusicBoxStudios
says

Hi MusicBox! I had a listen and the lead (cello) sounds nice in my ears, but the background strings do come off a bit “keyboardy”. Here’s what I’d try, use them more sparsely, ditch the runs and focus on just a few slow attack chords with long decay. Also try to layer the high notes with a harmonic, like a third or a quarter down (depending on the chord) to make the sound richer and more complex. As has been pointed out, you could make everything come together more by pushing back the lead a bit, by adjusting eq to make the sounds more similar (in this case, maybe lessen some high eq on the lead and boost highs on the background). Also I’d use the same reverb on all tracks and pan things around a bit to widen the image. The plucks (piano?) sound a bit overcompressed compared to the other stuff, instead you could gain from using a compressor/multipressor with low threshold on the stereo bus. Good luck ;)

Thank you! And thanks to everyone who offered advice and help on using or treating strings. I can definitely say I picked up a pointers that will help in the future.

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MusicBoxStudios
says

Horrible month. Full week with no sales. Hoping for better next month!

I right there with you. Nothing sold in roughly a week. Hoping this week will be better for us all!

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MusicBoxStudios
says

Hi mate,

I apply little bits of reverb via a bus on each channel whenever doing string arrangements and occasionally a bit to the master bus to ‘glue’ everything together. I also find the higher frequencies a bit harsh on most libraries (I’m yet to get Albion, so can’t comment on that), but I find it helps to roll off a bit of top end, particularly on the violin sections. Also remember that string placement is important ie make sure your cellos, violins I, violins II etc are placed : panned as you would expect them in an orchestral set up.

Other than than, I think everyone else has covered the basics like careful midi programming / automation used in a way that a real player would play. I find it helps to listen to real string players when trying to emulate strings rather than listening to other sample-based tracks as you’re more likely to get more realism that way.

Cato,

Thank you so much. I haven’t thought a lot about panning but I think that’s been a mistake also. Not to say that I panned everything to the middle because I didn’t. However I did not follow a typical seating arrangement and perhaps I should be doing just that.

Would you agree with this chart?

\\

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MusicBoxStudios
says

Based on the feedback here and after watching the video Mihai provided, it’s safe to assume the biggest missing factor in my string compositions is reverb. That being said, should it be added on a per track basis, applied to a bus track and routed, or coated over the entire mix?

Sorry if these questions seem remedial. This is a very new genre for me.

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MusicBoxStudios
says

Well I’m not an expert in the string field but I think the high timbres are too pronounced; and you need some reverb to help it blend in with the mix.

I think you’re right. Here my concern/question.

I typically use several different libraries in a track. Each seems to impose its own moderate reverb. The combination of them all gets muddy sounding pretty quickly. At the same time, most lack the ability to remove all reverb and go dry unless I’m missing a setting somewhere.

Thanks everyone for all the great help here. I’m taking it in and trying to learn. I’d like to stop making happy sappy music in exchange for what I love and that’s orchestral. Unfortunately for me, I’m really lacking on the technical know how it requires.

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MusicBoxStudios
says

I find this tutorial quite useful:
https://youtu.be/dwsvL3OiEFo

For a good Bricasti impulse, free, here:
http://www.samplicity.com/bricasti-m7-impulse-responses/

Would work very well in this free reverb:
http://www.liquidsonics.com/software_reverberate_le.htm

Watching it now. Thank you!

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