Posts by WPWiseOwl

421 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
  • Has collected 100+ items on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
WPWiseOwl
says

While not on CC, this one is highly recommended – https://wordpress.org/plugins/postmatic/

421 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
  • Has collected 100+ items on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
WPWiseOwl
says

Wow. Regardless of whether it works or has worked before. Don’t just embed scripts like that. Read all these in their entirety. Don’t scan / skim. Read all of it.

jQuery is already part of WP core and by default is setup for no conflict mode. Adding jquery and other scripts incorrectly to a WP site will likely cause plugin / theme conflicts immediately or later for you or someone else. Just don’t do it.

https://tommcfarlin.com/jquery-in-wordpress-the-right-way/

http://www.sitepoint.com/including-javascript-in-plugins-or-themes/

http://bit.ly/1PUB0Xe

The menu will never work reliably until jQuery, the menu JS and the menu CSS are all at least enqueued properly. Then the document must be in a “ready” state.

http://learn.jquery.com/using-jquery-core/document-ready/

You’ll need to integrate with the WP Menu system. I’ve not built a menu walker myself but I know what they are / for. Do not just hardcode HTML into php because it’s easier. This is just how menus work in WP.

http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/understanding-the-walker-class--wp-25401

Lastly, none of this code really belongs in a theme or child theme (read – don’t put it in the functions.php). Instead, you should endeavor to put it into a plugin for maximum modularity / maintainability.

Here’s a popular way to begin a new plugin without having to start from scratch as much has already been done for you and it’s free too – http://wppb.io

So, there you have it – adapting a JS menu into WP is easy to do WRONG. Learn to do it right. Figuring out how to extend the WP walker class and the Appearance > Menus screen is one of those things on my to do list but I keep having to put it off. Eventually I’ll get there. Never stop learning. :)

421 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
  • Has collected 100+ items on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
WPWiseOwl
says
421 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
  • Has collected 100+ items on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
WPWiseOwl
says

I’m interested in people’s reactions to this news. Are you in favor or against it? Do you think it will affect the future of competing eCommerce solutions for WordPress at all?

Why or why not?

http://www.woothemes.com/2015/05/woothemes-joins-automattic/
421 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
  • Has collected 100+ items on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
WPWiseOwl
says

WordPress Theme Developer Handbook Updated with Comprehensive Guide to the Customizer API

In response to more than 150 comments debating on the topic, Nick Halsey, who has worked extensively on the feature in WordPress core, stopped by the WP Tavern to offer a few words in support of the Theme Review Team’s decision:

Many of the comments here are misinformed or unaware of both the full power of and the future importance of the Customizer. I’ve given an overview of my perspective on my blog, and while those views don’t directly represent the views of the WordPress project, I can say that most people working on the Customizer in core would agree with my points. Like it or not, the Customizer is here to stay, and ignoring that fact will eventually cause users to turn against you. – Nick Halsey
http://wptavern.com/wordpress-theme-developer-handbook-updated-with-comprehensive-guide-to-the-customizer-api
421 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
  • Has collected 100+ items on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
WPWiseOwl
says

@Theme-Paradise – The current interface is basic but very programmable. You can either make custom controls or use custom controls made by others. There are several already linked in this thread. I’m also pretty eager to see what the recent Redux / Kirki team-up will produce. Even though Kirki already provides a better customizer experience as is, the support of the Redux team should make things very interesting!

If you have concerns that can’t be address by the current state of the Customizer API (adding custom controls, etc), another way to improve it is to submit a ticket in the WP Core Trac. WP v4.3 will be out in a few short months it could include changes from anyone especially this early.

421 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
  • Has collected 100+ items on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
WPWiseOwl
says

@HighGrade – Thanks for taking the time to post! You may not have read through this entire thread (or articles linked within – I don’t expect that). It’s clear to see that the market is already too saturated with 1000 option themes types though. Redux and Kirki Advanced Customizer are now joining forces. You’ll soon be able to use your Redux Options config file with Kirki instead to make the switch that much easier.

There are many segments to any given market and ThemeForest is no different. The number of themes that use the customizer today are far fewer than that of other options frameworks but that should represent an opportunity rather than obstacle. It’s all about perspective, I suppose.

Why choose to compete in the most crowded space if your product may not be well suited for it? If you think you have to because users won’t buy anything else or it won’t be profitable enough, I’d submit those may just be excuses. Regardless of the target market for a given theme, it’s really up to the author to educate / convince the prospective buyer they’re worth purchasing. That’s the pretty much the challenge of any seller trying to market their wares though as well as choosing the right audience within that market. Even though TF’s WP market only represents a portion of the WP community, this is still a necessity since it’s one of the larger ones.

I like your McDonald’s analogy. Those who go to eat at McDonald’s often especially those take the extra food deals will likely become fat over time. This is not unlike what will happen to a website using certain themes especially those with unnecessary junk bundled in. McDonald’s can offer all the good deals it wants but if it’ll make one fat or it will just go to waste (like non-used features), whether it’s a good deal or not may not be relevant. While Caveat Emptor still applies here, authors sometimes specifically prey on the ignorance of a certain buyers. It’s not exclusive to Envato markets as Apple does it too. It can certainly be profitable so I understand why it is done even if I may not agree with the practice.

There will almost always be plenty of the less savvy users that will still go “Ooh, shiny!”over such deals due to being uniformed / lacking experience. These users perhaps should not be your target market if you’re worried about the competition. They may even eventually outgrow their WP adolescence and no longer be in the market for such offerings. You may actually find it easier to sell to them then.

This has just been my experience. I’m always interested to hear stories from others whether they’re contrary to this or not.

421 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
  • Has collected 100+ items on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
WPWiseOwl
says

Some awesome news here, folks!

Redux and Kirki Frameworks Join Forces to Provide Better Support for the WordPress Customizer

http://wptavern.com/redux-and-kirki-frameworks-join-forces-to-provide-better-support-for-the-wordpress-customizer
421 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
  • Has collected 100+ items on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
WPWiseOwl
says

@BoldBocks – Wow. That’s a great, helpful bunch of links! I happen to be a DRY lover myself and was already was aware of those you posted. There were still a couple, I hadn’t seen before though. :-)

@Splendous – I think you’re referring to the “The Canvas” WP the here on TF? Yes, that theme really pushes customizer use to the next level and then some.

It shows the customizer can cope quite well with lots of options. It’s fairly well organized but looked like overkill to me. The author apparently didn’t feel limited at all. He probably had too much fun creating it and didn’t want to stop. Lol.

421 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
  • Has collected 100+ items on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
WPWiseOwl
says

Best reasons to use Unyson are that it’s a plugin, allows modular extensions and isn’t a theme (but can integrate into almost any theme). Good for making a theme since it is a framework. It also comes with a instructional theme to illustrate use of the framework. It has a builder extension which is optional and uses shortcodes AFAIK. Themes made with it will likely not be accepted to the WordPress theme repository (at least until it’s brought up to date / Customizer compliant) because of how it currently does theme options.

Best reason to use LayersWP is because it leverages the WP customizer. It is not a framework though and shouldn’t be used to build another theme. This a builder (not a framework) and also probably is not the best choice for a paid client site especially if you want future portability. If it’s not a client site or you’re not the type to think ahead / worry about the future, it could be a fine choice. This builder uses widgets instead of shortcodes though.

To be clear, Themes are NOT frameworks. Themes are themes. To call a theme a framework is disingenuous at best IMO. Genesis IS NOT a framework as much as they would like to call themselves that or convince people who don’t know better of it. It is too old / popular to change that misnomer now though. I don’t expect to change anyone’s mind on this as there are more people misusing the terminology than not. I just prefer not to perpetuate the misinformation any further. Smarter people than me have already said as much and some even before I even knew what WP really was.

http://justintadlock.com/archives/2010/08/16/frameworks-parent-child-and-grandchild-themes

Another take – http://wpsmith.net/2014/wp/theme-framework-child-themes-grandchild-themes/

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