Posts by WPWiseOwl

397 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has collected 100+ items on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
WPWiseOwl says
397 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has collected 100+ items on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
WPWiseOwl says

That’s an unusually slow speed (to me). Perhaps it’s rather your location / ISP / internet rate plan? Perhaps a public intuition like a library, internet cafe, etc would offer faster connectivity? Assumming there’s no issue on their end, downloading over a faster connection on your end is really the only alternative unless they’re willing to send you a DVD (at additional cost, I’m sure). You might contact them directly to find out.

397 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has collected 100+ items on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
WPWiseOwl says

@egemenerd – You beat me to it! I was going to suggest the same thing. ;-)

397 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has collected 100+ items on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
WPWiseOwl says

Having 3 different versions of the same WP theme won’t help customers, it will confuse them e.g. why should I buy the $40 one when I can get the $20 one, but then they will ask the author to add features they need to the $20 which are in the $40…

It would mean a total overhaul of the item pages but it’s the only option that wouldn’t confuse people.

It actually could help customers if structured right. It also might increase sales of a theme (even if not necessarily revenue initially). It looks like an entirely opt-in concept for authors, right? Not unlike the concept of “Free Enterprise”? Envato wouldn’t appear to be requiring any author to do this as far as I have seen. If you knew that you could get 3 new buyers by having a $20 version available but none of them would bite on the $60 version, would you still turn them down?

I do think that an “upgrade system” wouldn’t be a bad thing. Instead of the buyer purchasing a $20 item then having to pay $55, perhaps they could instead pay just the difference when they wished to upgrade. That could mean extra repeat business! This is not an uncommon practice, is it?. It also might be that buyers are more inclined to risk a (full price) purchase to see if a theme works out. Once it does, they simply upgrade to the more capable version. This might even result is few less angry buyers since they’d have potentially paid 2/3 less to find out a theme didn’t work for them.

This would especially be nice in the event the buyer didn’t need / want two licenses (Standard + Pro – $20 and $60 respectively for an $80 total) but just wants to upgrade their existing Standard license. This isn’t a terribly different license / upgrade model from many other software products they’ve purchased in the past, I’d imagine. Aren’t people pretty used to it by now?

All versions of an item should be prominently displayed / detailed upfront and “pre-sale” on the item’s page w/links to other versions (until Envato does the item page overhaul) so then at least buyers are informed. Yes, it would be the author’s responsibility (until Envato caught up) to educate their prospects and the prospect their responsibility to read (caveat emptor, right?). For those prospects / buyers that just don’t read such notices, well…ignorance is no excuse in the courts so why should it be any different here.

Buyers can ask all they want to have add features from higher versions to lesser ones but that doesn’t mean they’ll get it. A notice w/ link can be even posted on the item’s page stating nicely why this is not gonna happen. For authors, I’m sure this won’t be the first time you’ve had to tell someone “No”. Though, those who have trouble saying “No” here might get into trouble. LOL.

Ideally, if Envato officially had a policy that didn’t allow an author to add the distinctive features of the more expensive versions to lesser version to which an author could easily direct a customer to (like a knowledgebase article) saying they are forbidden to add such features that would be even better since the blame would then be squarely on Envato instead. Not unlike the “support is optional” mantra already in effect.

This is all from a buyer’s perspective. Maybe I just don’t get it but that’s my 2 cents worth anyhow. ;-)

397 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has collected 100+ items on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
WPWiseOwl says

Ok…Um…

First you’ll need to decide whether you’re envisioning the as a static HTML site or more CMS / Database driven (Wordpress, Drupal, Joomla, etc). The word “Theme” is typically reserved for CMS driven sites and Template for the Static ones. I’d suggest not using the terms interchangeably.

397 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has collected 100+ items on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
WPWiseOwl says

There wouldn’t appear to be a need to touch any code from what you’ve stated. All support requests for this theme should be handled by visiting the “Support” tab of the item’s page. This is the ONLY place to get support for this theme according to the author. If you haven’t done this yet, you need to do so first. If you have already, you just need to be patient. Good luck! :-)

http://themeforest.net/item/avenue-a-wordpress-magazine-theme/289114/support
397 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has collected 100+ items on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
WPWiseOwl says

@eriktailor – Yes, a definite oldie but goodie. If it ever supported more than an 960 grid out of the box, I might consider it. For my projects the grid is just way too small.

397 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has collected 100+ items on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
WPWiseOwl says

I’m currently checking this one out. It seems very well documented.

Semantic UI – http://semantic-ui.com/

A WordPress theme that uses it – https://github.com/ProjectCleverWeb/Semantic-UI-WordPress

397 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has collected 100+ items on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
WPWiseOwl says

@FuelThemes -

WooCommerce 2.1 is Responsive out of the box

The majority of WordPress themes released nowadays feature a responsive design. Now is the right time to make WooCommerce CSS responsive right out of the box. So if you’re using WooCommerce stock CSS and a responsive theme (for example WordPress core themes TwentyTen, Eleven, Twelve, Thirteen and Fourteen) all WooCommerce components will look pretty on your handheld devices

Did also you see this? – http://jameskoster.co.uk/snippets/disable-woocommerce-styles/

397 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has collected 100+ items on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
WPWiseOwl says

I really don’t like to speak badly of Ultimatum since it’s still an impressive product that the author has spent much time on. I’m sure there’s also plenty of people that just love it because they couldn’t have potentially built their site any other way. Let’s see, here’s a few off the top of my head though…

Monitors are not tiny anymore these days. Last I checked, it still uses a now very limited 960 grid system. It’s particularly inflexible if you want a 12 column 1170 design instead or want to do 16 columns for 2560. Before anyone asks…Yes, I actually have requests for this. If you understand grid based design, you won’t appreciate the limitations placed on the developer to make the layout builder work correctly for the enduser.

IE was even a bigger PITA to debug with all the ultimatum code running. IE 10/11 are better though. Browsers (Firefox and Chrome especially) are iterating faster than ever. Ultimatum can’t be relied on to react quickly enough.

It also seemed to me in the past to require so much more RAM than I’m used to. So shared hosting services don’t always suffice. Clients aren’t always interested in more expensive hosting options.

Last I checked, it’s based on the now much older Bootstrap v2 series. Bootstrap v3 has been out and has had several updates since it’s release last year. Now v3.1 just came out days ago. For the longest time it wasn’t even responsive. It always seem to be behind on current trends and staying current / ahead is what clients expect from me (especially those paying for bespoke sites).

by
by
by
by
by
by