Posts by adammonroe

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adammonroe
says

Yup I got your point. Same thing happened here. I knew for sure my latest track would never end up here but… You can never know! Loved your track man, I don’t know if it was intentional but it kind of reminds me of Beck.

I think also it’s the fact that when you have worked on something for 10-20 hours and it gets rejected, it’s hard not too get at least a little emotional about it, but time heals all wounds. Anyway, interesting thread!

390 posts
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adammonroe
says

You know, for all the complaining people do about rejected tracks, going through my rejected tracks I realize two things. 1. Most of those rejections were fair and I’m glad they didn’t get approved. 2. I have far more approvals then rejections.

Maybe I wouldn’t feel this way if I uploaded more, because I’d likely have a lot more rejections, but there it is. Anywhere, I’d like to share a track I uploaded knowing that there was almost no chance of it getting approved, because it’s not really AudioJungle material, but sometimes you have to say what the hell and attempt it anyway.

All for you (soundcloud)

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adammonroe
says

I think the problem will always be infinite supply vs finite demand. Because of globalization, we now have a near infinite supply of things like music, limited only by the number of people on the planet who are willing to make it. It used to be there were gatekeepers, entities, and companies you needed to get by, or you needed to have really strong connections, in order to get your music heard. Since the internet, we now have a more level playing field, but at the same time, by letting everyone play on the field, we have a grossly overcrowded field. It doesn’t matter how good you are at what you do, or how good your product is, promotion now matters more than anything, I repeat, promotion now matters more than anything. You have to be able to somehow distinguish yourself from the sea of white noise. However, we now have a situation where the majority of people realize they need to promote themselves, and we are all drowning in a sea of self-promotion, so even there, it is difficult to distinguish one’s self. Music promotion is really, really hard. It’s really, really difficult to get anyone to willingly listen to your music. Even if it’s good, most people simply don’t have time to listen to your music. One could make the argument that popular and successful music is only popular and successful because someone has paid massive amounts of dollars to promote it and make it so. Fortunately, a stock music site is quite a bit different, as you already have a built in audience of customers willing to listen to and buy music. I think here it’s really going to come down to how much traction you can pull and get from the site itself. Naturally, the best way to do that is to write good tracks and have some nice sales numbers, so that you have some kind of presence on this site. Everyone on this site will not be able to achieve such a presence, as is the case with everything in life, there’s only room for a few truly successful people, but I think there’s room here for varying degrees of success. The market is ever only going to be able to consume a finite amount of product, well conversely, the pool of product is increasing daily. The fact that you are making tracks everyday shows that you have the commitment it takes to be successful on this site.

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adammonroe
says

Audio Jungle: at least a third of your uploaded tracks will get rejected, and at least a third of the tracks that do get accepted likely wont ever sell. In other words, it’s pretty easy to get discouraged here, only the stubborn survive. The important thing is not to take things too personally. Sometimes stuff that should get approved doesn’t and vice versa, after all, we are all human. As far as feedback gos, it’s very rare you will ever get more than standard boilerplate critique, which is why the Facebook group is so invaluable. People on there aren’t afraid to tell you what the problems are with your tracks. most people only like to hear positive feedback, but people in that group will hear things that you don’t hear and tell you about it, and if you have 3 people telling you the same thing…well, they are probably right. Unfortunately, a lot of the posts that get through on there seem to be, “Hey, check out my new track on AudioJungle,” so I can see where Mihai_Sorohan is coming from. I’m not sure what people are trying to accomplish by promoting and spamming their tracks to other Audio Jungle authors. :)

390 posts
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adammonroe
says

Interesting stuff to be sure, and the grandfather of the modern synthesizer, but seems like a lot of work! Technically, all you really need to produce a pitch is some kind of waveform like the ones drawn here that you iterate through so-many-times-a-second. Computers are really good for this, analog synthesizers and oscillators too, but to hand-draw or cut these waveforms…eesh, not sure how you’d make it work without putting a lot of work into it. You could just have a roll of sine waves (or triangle or sawtooth or whatever) that you spin on a wheel and adjust the speed of the wheel to produce higher or lower pitches, but I’m not sure how you would automate/compose with that. Convert that information to voltages and you have sound. It feels like what they are doing is quite the opposite – having the wheel or whatever mechanism spin at a constant speed and spacing their waveforms out to create lower pitches and scrunching them in to create higher pitches…which would be a hell of a lot of work.

390 posts
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adammonroe
says

Seriously consider investing in a Solid State Hard drive. Your CPU or audio interface is not going to be your bottleneck here, it’s going to be your hard drive. All sample libraries need to periodically buffer/stream samples from your hard drive – even if you have 100 GB of Ram, sample libraries typically aren’t programmed to take advantage of all that memory – and hard drive access is very slow, so in real time, samples don’t get buffered within the time span allotted by your audio buffer, creating empty/partial/garbage value memory-arrays which in turn are creating your pops and crackles. SSD drives offer much better read/write times and can help to alleviate this issue. File streams have always been a bottle-neck in computing.

390 posts
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adammonroe
says

39/22= 1.772727272727272727272727

But if I omit all my tracks with no sales (half)....

3.54! YAY!
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adammonroe
says

There used to be a lot of analog drum machines (Roland 909, 808, R70, ect.) that people would process and mess with in studios to get certain sounds. Now you can download all those sounds (and thousands more) but it will always take a bit of processing to get things to sound decent. Gated Reverb is a pretty old school trick to make a snare “breathe.” Compressors/limiters, bitcrushers, distortion…really the possibility in terms of what you can pull out of samples these days is endless.

A lot of being a musician/composer/whatever these days isn’t just writing music, it’s the cultivation and curation of sounds. Say what you want about someone like Hans Zimmer, but he probably has one of the largest collection of sounds around.

As far as creating sounds…you can do a lot with synthesizers. It probably helps if you understand the difference between a square/saw/sine wave, what a low frequency oscillator is doing, ect, but it’s not necessary. There are so many tools these days where you can just mess with a few presets and come up with some amazing stuff.

If you ever feel dejected just remember that you are living in the modern age; what used to take 100,000 dollars and a room full of analog gear can now be accomplished with a few hundred dollars in samples and a computer.

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adammonroe
says

Chris Hein Chromatic Harmonica.

Sounds good, but maybe a bit overpriced? Maybe one day I’ll get around to sampling some harmonica.

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adammonroe
says

A: I don’t think they ding you for being exclusive/non exclusive. It’s really a choice you make. From my experience, the other stock music sites either don’t move as much product, or they will not accept your if your stuff is on AudioJungle anyway. No one is going to be promoting your music either way, that is up to you. They promote their site. Sometimes they will promote people within the site through featuring and other methods. From a business perspective, It’s BETTER for them if you are non-exclusive, because now they have to pay you less when you sell a track, and really, most of the other stock music sites aren’t much competition for AudioJungle. I am non-exclusive and I feel like I am losing out on money, but I like to upload my tracks to other places, just so I can upload some of my rejected tracks too.

B: I don’t think there is such a FAQ, just ask some people who have been around for years, they will tell you that sometimes review queues are short, sometimes they are long, it really depends on how well they are staffed. The amount of authors/submissions keeps growing at a steady rate, so they need to keep hiring reviewers to match that rate, but they are pretty fickle and selective about who they hire. I’ve seen review queues from 2-10 days, so I would generally expect anything between that at any random time.

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