Posts by adammonroe

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adammonroe says

I pretty much just begin writing music on the piano with chords/harmonies/melody once you have something going it is quite easy to take that music and orchestrate it. This is traditionally how orchestration has been done over the past few hundred years – guys like Williams still work this way I’m fairly certain. Sometimes it’s fun to just screw around on a template with all your instruments and produce something, but my best orchestral stuff is just “orchestrated” piano music.

Piano roll will yield no “soul,” realistic orchestration requires some midi and most importantly velocity data. An orchestra will almost always be “mixed” the same way – yes there are slight variations but you will always have your violins on the left, your cellos on the right, your brass farther back, ect. so on and so forth, anything else will just sound weird for a true “orchestral sound.”

Most of the newer libraries are pre-mixed and pre-reverbed so they already sound somewhat good so adding more reverb will accomplish nothing save for muddying up the sound. Important to mix libraries, or to at least have a few different libraries, because after awhile you will want 4 different horn voices, two different violin sections (possibly with divid), ect.

Understanding orchestration is probably infinitely more important than things like mixing and eq-not that these things aren’t important, but without the right tonal combinations you will get a very dry and dull sounding orchestral sound.

So on AudioJungle you are probably not aiming for a really accurate orchestral sound anyway, you probably want it to sound bigger and less realistic than a real orchestra, with a lot less reverb – this is more of a commercial sound these days and is probably more what people want to hear.

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adammonroe says

No they shouldn’t, that would be foolishness. Even if there was a good reason, It likely helps AJ’s promotion to say they are a large marketplace withe X numbers of users and Y number of files, not to mention the logistics and labor cost of iterating through all the profiles and determining which ones are active/inactive. From their end it would be a lot of work for nothing.

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adammonroe says

Everything sounds a bit like something.

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adammonroe says


I don’t understand why every brass library doesn’t doesn’t record the horns individually

Take a look at this.

http://www.spitfireaudio.com/bml-horn-section-volume-1
Yes they sound quite nice, actually all the Spitfire stuff sounds quite nice.
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adammonroe says

Adam,

Sorry…saw your post WAY after I started on the last one.

Just wanted to let you know this: if you didn’t like having to edit your performances after the fact like you have to in VSL, then the Hollywood Series most absolutely definitely is NOT the libraries for you! They take a whole heck of a lot of tweaking afterwards. They can sound phenomenal when you do take the time, but if you thought VSL or EWQLSO took some tweaking, HW takes it to another level.

Go with Cinesamples. The way it transitions from Staccatos to Legatos is very intuitive once you get used to it, and it’s probably the closest libraries will get with a ‘sit at the keyboard and play’ that is broken down for individual instruments.

Not so much the performance data as having to reverb, pan, and mix everything to make it sound like an orchestra. VSL is a super dry library where nothing is panned or placed in the mix for you – I feel like a lot of other libraries have a little reverb baked in and the panning and mixing pre-placed. There’s two approaches to sampling an orchestra: you can sample all the instruments dry and perfectly centered in stereo (it’s then up to the composer to mix and place everything, this is what VSL does) or you can record an orchestra more or less in stereo/decca, with everyone in their proper places the end effect being you likely end up with a much more “natural” sounding orchestra, but one whose sound can’t be tweaked as much. I know with the East West Hollywood libraries I’d still likely do a lot of mixing and eq and tweaking but it would be nice to start with something rather than nothing.

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adammonroe says

Ah, you were so excited too. Think I’ll keep saving up for all the Hollywood Stuff-the Diamond editions can be had in a bundle for around $1000 these days, not too bad at all. I think I originally spent much more than that for the special editions of VSL. VSL is ok, but sometimes it feels like you are “fighting” the patches. It would just be nice to sit down with a library that doesn’t require much post-processing to get it to sound good…although VSL woodwinds still sound nice…

...or maybe I’ll get some cinesamples stuff. It would be great to bag a library with string divisi. I don’t understand why every brass library doesn’t record the horns individually – I am always dividing the horns to play chords and such. VSL Dimension brass does this, but dimension brass sounds really flat too me and is probably overpriced.

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adammonroe says

They did not provide feedback? Usually they will provide some kind of reason, even if they don’t fully explain their reasoning. Usually something like, sample/production quality too poor, doesn’t have any utility for Audio Jungle, ect…

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adammonroe says

Sounds good to me, maybe try adding ukulele, glockenspiel, arpeggiated chords, and hand-claps to it? HAHA JUST KIDDING GUYS LIGHTEN UP!

:P

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adammonroe says

Well this is a very interesting thread I missed the first time around.

There’s nothing inherently wrong with giving away your music, and there’s nothing inherently wrong with producing music for the sake of making money.

I think a lot of us wobble between writing stuff we want to write and writing stuff we know to be commercially viable. If one is the type of person that really loves making music and can’t compromise on what they write, then maybe the music business isn’t for them. I think that type of person should find a job or start a business in a related field so they can support themselves financially well they pursue their own musical interests.

If on the other hand the person is the other type, and can easily write and tailor music to whatever the client or markets needs, then that person should pursue music as a career. At the end of the day, the music business is still a business and you are selling a product. Most clients want a musical product that is familiar sounding, because they are trying to use your music to market their own products, and the marketing needs to be familiar enough for the average person to “get it,” or make a positive association. This is why commercial music moves in trends – everyone marketing something wants to be on the leading edge of what is popular and what is in vogue, it helps them sell their product. You can go overboard and produce something that sounds TOO generic…but another topic for another time.

Sure, there are other outlets besides marketing – film and game scoring for example – and maybe someone with true passion can break in there, but on a stock music site, you better believe it’s mostly about marketability.

I think the hardest thing for a composer or musician to comes to terms with is that their music might be good, it might even be great -hell, it might even be genius – but at the same time, it might also have zero commercial viability, at least in the current marketplace. In this case, giving it away for free starts to make a lot of sense, but what’s the harm in still trying to sell it? At the end of the day, it comes down to this: it’s your life and it’s your music, you should do whatever the hell you want with both.

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adammonroe says

I really like your tracks, they’re very well put together :) I haven’t uploaded more frequently, my compositions aren’t more detailed or the production significantly better. The only thing I changed was that I have tried to learn what makes a piece of music more suitable for video. That is all that matters on here.
Best advice ever.
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