Posts by adammonroe

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adammonroe says


IMO, youtube is garbage for promotion these days, especially ever since they removed video responses – unless you already have an established channel with lots of subscribers.

Also, I have to go ahead and disagree with this statement.

Of course, everyone’s milage may vary, but in my own case, I started up my channel when I started here just 2 years ago with 3 or 4 videos to begin with. The ‘video responses’ feature had already been removed by that point, but I did a bit of research on how to effectively use YouTube, such as correct tagging, descriptions, quality content to increase watch time, etc and essentially work it to my advantage. (And all of this info was found via a simple Google search believe it or not).

2 years on and I’ve built a healthy and steadily growing subscriber base, and have referred literally hundreds of new customers over to AJ and the Envato marketplaces. So to say ‘YouTube is garbage for promotion’ is basically throwing the baby out with the bathwater.

The upshot is, do some research before putting any effort into anything. It’ll generally pay off :)
Hey man, good for you if youtube is working out! It’s always great to see someone be successful! I just wouldn’t expect a new musician or youtuber to pull 500,000 views off of one video for (of all things) stock music, although I guess anything is possible if you just “do a little research.” I’m sure we’ve all done “a little research” when it comes to SOE and metadata. ;)

The one positive thing I’ll say that youtube has going for it is that since Google bought them out your videos will sometimes pop up on the front page of a Google search if your SEO is good.

Not trying to bring him down guys, but I’m not trying to blow sunshine up his butt either. The average user experience when it comes to selling stock music is that it’s a STRUGGLE. Most of us will have an average user experience, because most of us are average users. Again, it really comes down to what kind of music he’s trying to make and what his goals are. You can put in the hard work, effort, and marketing it takes to become a successful stock music author, his question was is it worth it in relation to other things one could be doing to make money, and realistically, for the average person, it probably isn’t. Stock music is like everything else in life; the distribution of success and money is more towards a few than towards the many and most people’s experiences will be less than ideal. If you go into the experience knowing this and you are willing to work really, really, really, hard, you can find success. :)

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adammonroe says


It probably mostly depends on what kind of music you are thinking about writing,

IMO, youtube is garbage for promotion these days, especially ever since they removed video responses – unless you already have an established channel with lots of subscribers. If you are not adverse to spamming you might be able to successfully market your music.

Is it worth it in terms of money? Probably not, unless you are super-fast at audio production and can throw a lot of tracks up and/or you start pumping out some hits. There are far, far easier ways to make money, IMO.

The sales volume on AudioJungle is much lower than on other Envato sites. I’d say if you can sell a track two times in a year that is a successful track.

For me it’s worth it because I’d be writing music anyway, so at least I have somewhere to send my music.

Sorry to sound so pessimistic but really I think I am just being realistic. :-)
you are everything except realistic,you got 16 files and you registered in June 2012,how many sales did you expect to get? i mean i know you can’t get rich here but people in poorer countries can easily make average salary here..

You have 59 items and 95 sales – sort of fits in with my 2 sales per track average doesn’t it?

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adammonroe says

It probably mostly depends on what kind of music you are thinking about writing,

IMO, youtube is garbage for promotion these days, especially ever since they removed video responses – unless you already have an established channel with lots of subscribers. If you are not adverse to spamming you might be able to successfully market your music.

Is it worth it in terms of money? Probably not, unless you are super-fast at audio production and can throw a lot of tracks up and/or you start pumping out some hits. There are far, far easier ways to make money, IMO.

The sales volume on AudioJungle is much lower than on other Envato sites. I’d say if you can sell a track two times in a year that is a successful track.

For me it’s worth it because I’d be writing music anyway, so at least I have somewhere to send my music.

Sorry to sound so pessimistic but really I think I am just being realistic. :-)

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adammonroe says

I think first things first: sound libraries before composition. IMO, he will get approved on composition and rejected based on his sound libraries and production. Once he updates his sound libraries he can focus on composition and trying to sound generic enough/like everyone else in order to sell tracks. Personally, I like the originality of in his composition. :-)

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adammonroe says

Maybe it’s just me, but I never use a crash cymbal without a counterpart in the low end. I don’t like the sound of an unsupported crash cymbal – but I love the combination of kick and crash, timpanis and crash, anything deep, boomy and Hans-Zimmer-like and crash… In your piece there is a lot of unsupported crash cymbal stuff going on. It always sounds halfway up and halfway down but never where you want to be. It sounds like “I want to emphasize this part of a bar with an orchestral kick drum, this part of the same bar with this cymbal and that one a half not later with that cymbal” and so on. Don’t do that! Choose the parts you want to emphasize painstakingly and let it crash and thunder at the same time. Edit all your midi-tracks according to this. Concentrate the energy on parts you want to highlight and let your musical ideas do the rest in the other parts.

I have to disagree with this. Although I agree orchestral percussion is best when used sparingly, there is nothing that says you can’t use cymbals without a corresponding low end. Just because certain styles of orchestration are in vogue right now doesn’t mean that everything else is wrong. Grieg’s use of alternating Timpani and Cymbals
Holst’s use of unsupported cymbal to end a musical phrase

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adammonroe says

I made this just yesterday , I have not had Audio Jungle actually accept any of my uploads, would this one be any different? Opinions greatly appreciated! https://soundcloud.com/anthony-toomey/battle-theme

It’s very cool man, but I think you might get the typical gripes about your sound libraries.

Actually, most of the stuff on your soundcloud sounds good to me, you just need to invest in more realistic sample libraries. It sounds good for video games from 10 years ago, or even for iphone or android games now, but Audio Jungle doesn’t really approve stuff unless the sound libraries are film-quality.

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adammonroe says

It’s funny because it’s a very clean guitar sound. I don’t mean clean like it’s a clean amp sound without overdrive or effects, I mean it’s clean like it sounds too sampled. I’m of the opposite opinion of lemega: I think the rhythm guitar sounds bad, the lead guitar sounds fine for the genre. If you are playing a chord multiple times with that kind of rhythm, it sticks out to me as being slightly “fake” sounding, especially when two 8th notes are played back to back.

However, for the genre I don’t think it really matters. You obviously aren’t going for an ultra realistic sound here. I think a live guitar would probably actually go AGAINST the rest of the production, but hey, that’s just my opinion.

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adammonroe says

AEO2 on a LAN – used to beat the puke out of all my friends.

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adammonroe says

AudioJungle is easy to join but hard to keep up with. Probably if someone is new to making music, they will submit a track, get rejected, and get discouraged. Who knows what the statistics are, but I’m guessing there is probably a high drop-out rate right off the bat in regards to new users. Once you get your tracks approved, they tend to sit around for awhile, especially if you are not writing commercial or in a genre that is “in” right now. This too can be discouraging. Really, the only people left in the long-run are people who find success, people who are extremely stubborn, and people who generally just love to make music and don’t know what the hell else to do with it. :-)

When it comes time to review, the reviewers probably have some general guidelines, they might even be instructed to “keep it general,” otherwise everyone would want specific detailed descriptions with their hard rejections. Sometimes a track just doesn’t “fit” or “gel” and it’s easier to say, “doesn’t meet quality standards” or whatever than it is to point to very specific things and then possibly have the person fix those things, feel confident enough to resubmit, and the track still doesn’t “work.”

It’s also sometimes useful to submit hard rejections in the item discussion forum – If your track really sucks, people will have no reservations letting you know why and if it’s actually good everyone will start to wonder why it got rejected! It’s good to get feedback from a whole group of people rather than just one reviewer. Individuals can be flawed. Sometimes you just catch someone’s ear the wrong way on a certain day and it is as simple as that.

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adammonroe says

I’ve tried to learn how to sight read but it interferes with my playing by ear and my intuitive side. I do know how to read music but not sight read. For me personally knowing what I do know about theory is enough and if know too much it will interfere with my creativity. I think it was Korsokov that said that creativity can make up for a lack of knowledge, but I could be slaughtering his quote.

I think when it’s time to be creative you have to be able to disengage from thinking too much about formal rules and just play whatever sounds good. Sight reading is just a dumb skill – by “dumb” I mean it’s just something you practice over and over again until you can do it. I like to play by ear, and it’s not hard for me to pick out melodies and transpose things, but I think part of being a good musician is constantly pushing yourself to do things that aren’t easy, so I have been trying to sight read for a few years, as I find it a challenge, and very slow to make progress.

I think creativity is the paramount skill to have when it comes to composition. You will absorb other peoples music – whether it be by simple passive listening or from studying sheets. Creativity is key in virtually any application, whether it be math, computer programming, music, science, whatever. Technical ability and theory can be improved/learned, creativity can only really be shaped and guided. :-)

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