Posts by bravewhale

23 posts
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Has sold $1+ on Envato Market
+2 more
bravewhale says

Hi there, I’m wondering which authors provide plugins with their themes for shortcodes, post types, etc, instead of building those features into their themes. These can be plugins the author created themselves, or 3rd party additions (like visual composer).

I’m mostly interested in content creating plugins like shortcodes, so no need to list off every single 3rd party plugin like CF7.

Here are a couple examples of authors I know that provide such plugins for their themes:

-themezilla (orman clark)

-themebeans

This is not a discussion thread. I just want a list of authors who provide plugins similar to the above examples, and perhaps explain which type of plugins you offer.

This is also to help spread the love for creating pluggable themes that don’t have built in content creating features. If we see who else is doing it this way, maybe more will catch on.

Thanks!

23 posts
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Has sold $1+ on Envato Market
+2 more
bravewhale says

Personally, we don’t like how WordPress built-in customizer looks like at first place. It’s hard for the user to manage all the options there. Maybe we should use it only for some simple options, because it doesn’t offer to much possibilities. But, if we use some theme options framework as well, then why we should split sets of options on two different places. It’s also not intuitive for a user.

The customizer should be used for ALL visual style options: background colors and images, heading colors, text color, div colors, etc. The customizer was designed to be a live preview design tool. It only makes sense to use it strictly for visual options.

Your options panel could still be used for other options like setting social network icon urls, etc, but the consensus says this should be added as a plugin any.

23 posts
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Has sold $1+ on Envato Market
+2 more
bravewhale says

Just to keep things on track, my comment was regarding the horrible array of custom option panels. Whether they should or shouldn’t be used isn’t the point here. And I agree any content related input should be added as a plugin, but that also means a dev could just include their crappy custom options panel as a plugin.

I’m hoping to explore the need for more standard tools we all use. In this case a standard options panel (plugin). And yes it should be used only to update theme content. All theme styles and displays should be done in the customizer.

Hypothetically, if we could standardize the use of an options panel plugin, what would be the most suitable and widely agreeable panel be to use or to convert into a plugin for use in themes we develop?

Thanks everyone!

23 posts
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Has sold $1+ on Envato Market
+2 more
bravewhale says

Exactly, everyone should be using this as it’s part of the WP Core, IMO the new themeforest guidelines should be banning external options panels, just seems like extra, wasted code.

Do you think the theme customizer should be used for options that are non display related? It’s my opinion that it should not be used for options that update content, and only for style options. Maybe some basic wordpress options like tagline, etc.

In that case, a 3rd party options panel may still be needed for other specific theme options.

23 posts
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Has sold $1+ on Envato Market
+2 more
bravewhale says

The theme customizer is definitely something every theme should utilize. Though, I still think some themes will need an options panel. The customizer should only be used to offer design and basic settings related options. You don’t want to see social icon fields, theme meta box text areas, etc, inside the customizer. That stuff still makes sense in an options panel. I just wish there was a convention for option panels.

23 posts
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Has sold $1+ on Envato Market
+2 more
bravewhale says

Custom option panels are horrible, please stop it! Yet another theme I purchased with an atrocious options panel design. But it doesn’t stop at the poor design; they are clunky and function not as you’d expect. There needs to be a standard for this!

It makes sense to use an options panel that is as similar to Wordpress as possible. Maybe this one: http://leemason.github.io/NHP-Theme-Options-Framework/index.html

I don’t care which one the community chooses, but it would be awesome if every developer got on board and started using the same options panel and followed the same conventions.

23 posts
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Has sold $1+ on Envato Market
+2 more
bravewhale says

Great thread; very important topic. And I agree. Now, deciding whether or not to even include a carousel or other rotator in your theme is tricky. On the one hand you want to provide your customer with the option to use it or leave it out, but on the other hand your customer is just like any other client and likely does not know why they should or shouldn’t include it.

If you’re working on a site for a client, you’re the one directing the design and content based on UX and user data insights, etc, so you would probably leave it out all together. But when we’re selling a product to the masses, maybe we can’t go about that the same way. Educating them about it first and then giving them the option is probably the best solution here.

23 posts
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Has sold $1+ on Envato Market
+2 more
bravewhale says

Did you spend some time browsing through all the themes? You’ll find something if you look around.

23 posts
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Has sold $1+ on Envato Market
+2 more
bravewhale says

Your attention to design quality is lacking. It looks somewhat out dated (huge rounded corners, clunky scroll bar, small font-size, etc). Some colors detract from the design aesthetic (gray form fields on bright blue… ew), portfolio lightbox looks unattractive. Try using a lighbox script that already looks really nice (fancybox, or colorbox).

I hope this is helpful :)

23 posts
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Has sold $1+ on Envato Market
+2 more
bravewhale says

I use Themeforest themes for my clients, and charge 150$-500$, is this low or high?

A very important factor in all this is your type of client. The Oxford Group says they get fortune 1000 clients who have large budgets, so charging them $8,000 is not a problem. But if you find your clients on CraigsList and they have a low budget (below $1,000) then that’s the range you should charge within. As you find new clients, and determine their budgets, you can start to charge more. Just go with the flow and charge what the site is worth to the client.

I personally do mostly custom WP sites for my clients, but I’ve done several theme sites, and they have in fact ranged from $500 – $4000, depending on the client’s budget and how I got the client.

Also remember, that you’re ideally trying to use a theme to take advantage of its out of the box features. So if a low budget client wants you to customize something that can’t be done in the theme options, you should tell them it will cost more. Let them know that for their budget, you need to do things as quickly and easily as possible (i.e. using the theme out of the box). This even works with larger clients who place more value on getting a site online ASAP.

I’d like to point out that I think it’s inane to create service limitations like, “you only get 5-10 pages for this price,” when you’re using a WP theme. These themes have page templates which are ready to go! How hard is it for you to create a new page in the admin? The same philosophy goes for other limitations others may set, that really don’t impact the time it takes to setup a theme. Don’t take advantage of your clients with silly restrictions.

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