Posts by bravewhale

23 posts
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Has sold $1+ on Envato Market
+2 more
bravewhale says

Or the secret third option, FireFox’s built in dev tools! Hit Shirt+F7 to open it. This thing is similar to FireBug, but I like it’s stylesheet editor way more (syntax highlighting, etc) plus it’s lighter weight.

I still use FireBug for certain inspecting tasks, as it still does some things better (like show padding and margin on the screen).

Chrome Dev Tools doesn’t allow you to edit the stylesheet in text mode, which is a major feature I need! Chrome has a much better console, so it’s superior for debugging scripts.

23 posts
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Has sold $1+ on Envato Market
+2 more
bravewhale says

At least you know what your problem is; visual design. It looks like a prototype, not a finished design. So, you should start improving your design skills. Browse other themes that look amazing and study the CSS and look at how they design buttons, and text, and use of images and background textures, and box-shadows, etc.

Otherwise, you should look for a design partner. Ask around the forums if someone wants to team up with you. They can design, and you can code.

23 posts
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Has sold $1+ on Envato Market
+2 more
bravewhale says

I don’t have any themes for sale on here yet, but I am working on my first. However, I’ve been building custom wp sites for clients for 5 years, and pricing is always difficult to pin down.

I’ll tell you that I have an hourly range, depending on the client and type of work, that I charge from $50 to $80 per hour.

If I’m just doing support, like talking them through how to update something, or checking why their posts aren’t showing up and then fixing an options setting, I’ll likely charge on the low end; so $50/hour for that kind of support.

23 posts
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Has sold $1+ on Envato Market
+2 more
bravewhale says


...that if we start discussing standard ways to use shortcodes, CPTs, etc, we can being moving every developer in that direction. Just little by little.

What a noble thing to do :)

Allthough i partly agree, just because it’s your standard thing to do doesn’t mean it has to be someone else’s.

Haha, gee thanks :P

That’s very true, and I don’t propose we force this on anyone. I’m saying there are several devs who want to embrace this plugin methodology, so we should have a way for them to work toward the same goal. If you or another dev wants to follow suit and build with these standards, then wonderful! If not, then please continue as you wish. I just suspect if we start standardizing this sort of thing, and more devs jump on board, then it’s more likely to be beneficial to all devs as time goes on.

I don’t dislike themes that include a bunch of features, and I’m still amazed by what these authors can do, but I don’t think it’s a very scaleable or future proof way of building themes for the masses.

23 posts
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Has sold $1+ on Envato Market
+2 more
bravewhale says

All CPTs in separate plugins This means that users can activate only the CPTs they need, and have access to the data if they change themes.

That’s excellent! That’s a great reason to inlude CPTs as plugins, because not every customer needs each post type enabled. Plus, it help portability to their next theme.

I’m thinking there are enough developers here who want to embrace a more plug-able theme structure, that if we start discussing standard ways to use shortcodes, CPTs, etc, we can being moving every developer in that direction. Just little by little.

23 posts
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Has sold $1+ on Envato Market
+2 more
bravewhale says

Show me just one author that doesn’t include shortcodes in his theme, doesn’t include a drag & drop builder directly in the theme, but gives everything via plugins.

Here’s one of the largest, most popular, high grossing sellers on the marketplace, I’m sure we all know of, who includes very little baked into each theme. And includes compatibility with their own set of plugins. http://themeforest.net/user/OrmanClark/portfolio

There you go. Others have followed suit, and more will do the same.

23 posts
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Has sold $1+ on Envato Market
+2 more
bravewhale says

The thing I like about ThemeForest is that, as I see it, they don’t necessarily sell WordPress themes, they sell sites that happen to use WordPress as a backend. That’s a huge distinction, and I think it’s totally valid. As a TF customer, I’m not interested in buying a WordPress theme. I’m interested in buying a site.

This is very true; I’d imagine so for the majority of TF customers. So, another question is, should we as developers be able to dictate what a customer gets when they’re looking for an all-in-one website solution, and with that, dictate how it is used?

If a customer wants a website built that’s fully loaded, and a year from now wants something different that may have new or altered functionality and features, I’m sure they’re aware that buying a different fully loading theme means almost starting over with their content input. In fact, I’ve had clients who need a theme and are typically fine with re-inputting content. It’s almost expected as being part of the web development process.

I certainly favor plug-ability in theme development, but I think there’s another layer here we need to work through. The web development customer is either paying for a service from a design company who may build a wordpress site, or they’re buying a theme on TF. Either way I think a lot of these customers look at it as a site that one day will need to be redesigned and the content may need to be reworked.

How far should we go to determine how a theme is built and used when there are these types of customers?

Finally…


I even brought up the notion of a “WP Gold Certified” badge for themes that choose to uphold the highest of “best practices”.

I had this exact idea :) I think developers here on TF should unite and form an alliance, with a badge we can play on our profiles. This would indicate that we follow a standard set of development guidelines, and if the customer buys themes from us they know they’ll be safe during theme changes.

I would argue that WP doesn’t need a standard plugin to handle shortcodes. What WP needs is a standard list of shortcodes that all themes support.

Instead just waiting around for an official codex release of standard wordpress development guidelines, I think we should band together here on TF, as an alliance, and start deciding on these standards right now! Since it’s such an important issue on TF, there could be several forum threads related to determining these guidelines; starting with a standard list of shortcodes. I may be so bold to start that thread myself :P

23 posts
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Has sold $1+ on Envato Market
+2 more
bravewhale says

Thanks to everyone for chiming in! I didn’t think it would get this many replies.

I believe my question was answered. I failed to realize that Themeforest isn’t actually responsible for the copyright infringement of others, therefore of course all these themes with Pixar images get accepted!

I’m well aware of my own responsibility to uphold copyright laws :)

Buying stock photos is a great idea, but I wish there was another resource of high quality industry images, such as Pixar or Dreamworks, that are purposely made available for use in demo material. That’d be awesome :D

Thanks again everyone!

23 posts
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Has sold $1+ on Envato Market
+2 more
bravewhale says

How do these themes pass the Themeforest review and get accepted to the marketplace if in fact the images they use are copyrighted? Is it possible there is a repository of these high quality Pixar / other movie images that are in fact public domain and free to use?

23 posts
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Has sold $1+ on Envato Market
+2 more
bravewhale says

I see so many theme previews with beautiful images from Pixar, Disney, and other movies that I only assume are copyrighted images. Are they breaking copyright laws by using these, and where can I get images like this to legally use in my theme previews?

Thanks!

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