Posts by cspcreative

55 posts
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cspcreative says

4,000,000+ marketplace items … unbelievable!

I find it amazing that I get sales at all considering how many great items and authors there are here. What are the odds?! Like, how many items get sold on GR on a daily basis, vs how many sales I make (0, 1 or 2, sometimes 3 or 4).

Do you feel lucky?

55 posts
  • Australia
  • Bought between 1 and 9 items
  • Exclusive Author
  • Has been a member for 2-3 years
  • Referred between 100 and 199 users
  • Sold between 10 000 and 50 000 dollars
cspcreative says

If you’re relying on pixels then a 32×32px icon will print at 2.7×2.7mm and a 16×16px at 1.35×1.35mm @300ppi without interpolating any pixels. That’s pretty small! If you want them to be any bigger than that then you’ll lose quality. If of course you’re relying on vector based files then that won’t be a problem. From an aesthetic point of view, if you want your icons to be printed small then go for simplicity, and don’t chose anything with fine line detail or colour complexity as it may disappear when printed at small sizes.

55 posts
  • Australia
  • Bought between 1 and 9 items
  • Exclusive Author
  • Has been a member for 2-3 years
  • Referred between 100 and 199 users
  • Sold between 10 000 and 50 000 dollars
cspcreative says

Hi all. I’m new to AJ and would love to get some feedback on one of my faves http://audiojungle.net/item/driller/2661725 Cheers.

55 posts
  • Australia
  • Bought between 1 and 9 items
  • Exclusive Author
  • Has been a member for 2-3 years
  • Referred between 100 and 199 users
  • Sold between 10 000 and 50 000 dollars
cspcreative says

1 of men (english), 1 of angels (unknown).

55 posts
  • Australia
  • Bought between 1 and 9 items
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  • Has been a member for 2-3 years
  • Referred between 100 and 199 users
  • Sold between 10 000 and 50 000 dollars
cspcreative says

I’ve been using Photoshop since version 2! Not CS2 — version 2! Since 1992. Back then there was no such things like layers, layer masking or blend modes. It was tricky to use! Experience and experimenting got me where I am today — certainly not a guru but I can pull my weight with it. Online training helped me heaps in recent years. I use lynda.com for learning all sorts of things. But breaking it down the things I find fundamental to know are how to make good selections, using layer masking and layer blend modes, and also non-destructive adjustment layers. There’s obviously so much to know, and every one uses Photoshop in their own unique way, or blend of learned methods. At the end of the day it’s the design quality that counts (it kind of rules over technical know-how), so focus on design — have an end goal (or vision) in mind and then work out what is the best way to use PS to get on screen what you have in your head — that’s where your skills will grow.

Then again, that’s only one way of doing things — that’s the way it’s been for me.

55 posts
  • Australia
  • Bought between 1 and 9 items
  • Exclusive Author
  • Has been a member for 2-3 years
  • Referred between 100 and 199 users
  • Sold between 10 000 and 50 000 dollars
cspcreative says

The watermark gets added by Envato when you upload your files for review. I think that’s what you’re talking about right?

55 posts
  • Australia
  • Bought between 1 and 9 items
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  • Referred between 100 and 199 users
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cspcreative says

There are two issues with converting RGB documents to CMYK . One is ‘out of gamut’ colours, the other is the layer blend modes — but neither of them should be a reason for NOT using RGB as the main colour space.

The gamut (or dynamic range) of colours that can be produced in RGB (as radiant light) is a lot larger that what CMYK can physically be produced with ink. If you don’t pay attention when creating RGB documents intended for CMYK you could end up with RGB colour values that are ‘out of gamut’ — meaning it is impossible to reproduce them using CMYK inks. For example, try converting 100%R 100%G 0%B to CMYK and see the colour shift!

The other issues is layer blend modes. Layer blend modes (like screen and multiply) work the best in RGB because they are light-based blending techniques. The layer blend modes are designed to produce effects that can be created using radiant RGB light sources — ie. an LED or LCD (CRT for the old schoolers). Because light can be blended together in so many ways using different mathematical techniques, RGB is the optimum colour space to use them. And tell me, what good designer worth his salt does not take advantage of layer blend modes? Colour space of choice for layer blend modes — RGB ! Conversion to CMYK ? YUCK!

CMYK is an ink-based system that relies ultimately on the reflected light that the printed document is viewed in — the colours will NOT be presented to your eyes via a radiant light source like from a monitor. Sounds weird, but this is important! The way inks are blended together is almost opposite to how light is blended together — you add more light to an image on screen and it gets lighter, you add more ink to you image on paper and it gets darker. Photoshop has to treat a CMYK document differently to an RGB document. It has to take into account the real world. When you’re blending layers in RGB it works as intended because you’re using light to create light based effects, when you use layer blend modes in CMYK you’re trying to use inks to simulate light based effects — and that just doesn’t work I’m afraid!

IMHO , converting layered RGB documents that utilise blend modes to CMYK is bad practice. An RGB image needs to be flattened before converting to CMYK to get the best (or an acceptable) result. Layer blend modes simply don’t work as intended in CMYK — it’s a fact! So for that, always keep a layered RGB master for editing, then flatten, convert to CMYK and SAVE AS a new document.

I use RGB all the way and only convert to CMYK when I know the print destination. For instance, is it going to be printed on coated or uncoated stock? Is it newsprint? Do I know the dot gain characteristics of the paper? Do you know the total ink limit of the paper/press you’ll be printing on? In a professional environment you need to know these things to get the best results. For example, try printing a 340% total ink limit pic on the front page of your local newspaper and see what it looks like! BLAHHHH !!!!! Convert to CMYK for the destination … always remember that.

There’s only 1 reason I can think of to design specifically in CMYK is if the CMYK values need to be precise. 0%C 100%M 100%Y 0%K for example — you won’t get those numbers when converting from 100%R 0%G 0%B! If your colour values are absolutely important (like for a logo) then use CMYK by all means.

But I believe whole heartedly that layered .psd files on GR should be (as mandatory) supplied in RGB , and CMYK as an option. Then the downloader has full control over how the layers blend together, but more importantly how it will be converted to CMYK — that decision should be in the hands of the designer. He/she know’s the stock it’s going on, he/she knows the TIL (total ink limit), and if he/she needs 220% TIL and his/her download is 320% TIL then he’ll/she’ll need to convert it to RGB then back to CMYK anyway!!!

Look at it this way … what colour space are all the images on PhotoDune supplied in? RGB right? But some of them get printed don’t they? Do they need to be offered in CMYK as well? No … it’s up to the downloader to convert it to a space that suits their needs right? Selah.

55 posts
  • Australia
  • Bought between 1 and 9 items
  • Exclusive Author
  • Has been a member for 2-3 years
  • Referred between 100 and 199 users
  • Sold between 10 000 and 50 000 dollars
cspcreative says
55 posts
  • Australia
  • Bought between 1 and 9 items
  • Exclusive Author
  • Has been a member for 2-3 years
  • Referred between 100 and 199 users
  • Sold between 10 000 and 50 000 dollars
cspcreative says

I must be missing something! How do you get a 70MB .psd from a flattened image at that resolution? I saved an uncompressed .tif at that resolution for 25.9MB! I would understand that file size from a layered document but not from a flattened file.

Check to make sure you’re not saving extra alpha channels in your document — they add to the overall file size.

55 posts
  • Australia
  • Bought between 1 and 9 items
  • Exclusive Author
  • Has been a member for 2-3 years
  • Referred between 100 and 199 users
  • Sold between 10 000 and 50 000 dollars
cspcreative says

In Photoshop, with your RGB document open, you can check which colours are going to be affected (out of gamut) when you change to CMYK by going to View > Gamut Warning. Photoshop will highlight what areas are ‘out of gamut’ — or what colours will not translate into the CMYK working space — they will not look the same, they will be changed. You can also check to see how your RGB document will look when converted to CMYK by going to View > Proof Colours. These two view options can help you in editing your colours in RGB mode to be more compatible with a conversion to CMYK .

The dynamic range of colour that can be represented by the CMYK colour space is limited to what we can see with reflected light (the light from your surroundings) using inks printed on (typically) a piece of paper. The dyamic range of colour we can see on a monitor is larger because it is radiant light emitted from your monitor, so it can create more vibrant colours than what is possible to print.

If you’re designing for a CMYK output you should work within the confines of the CMYK gamut, or colour space as it is also called (so what you see is what you get, so to speak). You can work in RGB mode, but be mindful that some colours will not be able to be reproduced on paper as you see them on screen — they exist ‘outside’ of the CMYK gamut and will need to be brought back inside (dulled down).

Another reason why there will be changes from RGB to CMYK is how the layer blending modes work. The layer blending modes are designed around light which is perfect for the RGB colour space (combinations of red, green and blue light) — not so much for the CMYK colour space which is not representative of light — but ink! The blending modes compute differently between CMYK and RGB so you will get different results (typically darker in CMYK than RGB ). The best way to get a CMYK document to properly represent the RGB layer blend modes is to flatten your RGB document it before you convert it. But, if you’re interested in being able to edit a layered CMYK document that uses layer blend modes, it would be best to work in the CMYK colour space to start off with, and design your effects to suit CMYK , rather than designing something in RGB that will not convert as it looks to CMYK .

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