Posts by greenshady

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greenshady says
You can use the standalone version of bbPress if you want: http://bbpress.org/download/legacy/

I’d recommend going with the plugin version though if you’re just starting new forums.

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greenshady says
Naming is wrong. Blog consists of posts. Portfolio consists of portfolio items.

The plugin that’s already in the works uses portfolio_item as the post type name. That would be correct. A “portfolio” is a group of items.

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greenshady says
What about “client_testimonial”?

Definitely a good one. I’ve gotten several other requests for a “testimonial” post type as well. In fact, I already have most of the code for this one because I’ve got testimonials on my site.

Keep the ideas coming. As an update, here’s the post type suggestions so far:

  • portfolio
  • testimonials
  • events

Others on my list are:

  • ads
  • FAQs
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greenshady says
True there is a wide array of custom fields that could be used with a portfolio CPT so why not include a large set of them, then provide an easy way for the theme to enable or disable the use of certain fields as needed? That way maybe 90% of portfolio themes will find the fields they need. The other 10% could then propose/contribute additional custom fields as needed. Yeah?

That’d be pretty simple to do with the “post-type-supports” functionality or even tying into the “theme-supports” functionality. It’d just depends on the fields. We just need the ideas for the moment; I’ll be able to handle the implementation in an easy-to-modify way.

Thus far, the proposed fields for the portfolio plugin are:

  • date
  • url
  • client
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greenshady says

@dekciw

I wouldn’t want to cover all the fields that might be needed. I’m looking for fields that’d pass the 80/20 rule here.

You should definitely build a custom plugin if you need to extend it or remove something. That is what’s so great about WordPress’ Plugin API — it’s pretty much infinitely extensible.

@greenshady if you post the github link once you setup this plugin I would be more then glad to help if I can!
I didn’t want to break any forum rules by self-promoting anything. But, here’s the link to the portfolio plugin. I suppose a forum mod will remove it if it’s not OK. https://github.com/justintadlock/cpt-portfolio
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greenshady says

Why would you not include meta fields? I’m thinking “date” and “URL” are definitely fields that are needed for portfolios. I honestly haven’t done too much work in this space though.

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greenshady says

One of the things I hope to bring to both the ThemeForest as well as the entire WordPress community is a set of standard content type plugins to allow theme developers to build from.

When I say “content types”, I’m referring to plugins that handle custom post types, taxonomies, and post meta. Each plugin would be different depending on the scenario. For example, I’m currently building a base portfolio plugin, which will include both a post type and taxonomy for handling portfolios. Theme developers will be able to support this plugin just like BuddyPress, bbPress, WooCommerce, and so on.

With that in mind, here’s some questions for you all:

  • What post types are you seeing used often?
  • What taxonomies should go with those post types?
  • What post meta or other fields should go with the post types?

Right now, I’m just rounding up ideas so that I can see which direction to go next. I welcome any and all feedback on what should be included within the plugins.

Note: Let’s please not turn this into a discussion on what belongs in a theme vs. a plugin. We already have a thread for that.

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greenshady says

Okay, that makes a lot more sense now. Here’s three solutions:

  • Set up a single theme option to select the post type to display in the slider.
  • Go with no theme options at all and just load posts, regardless of type, by date.
  • You could have a page template with slider that displays posts and an alternate template with slider that displays portfolio items.
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greenshady says

Still not quite the answer I was going for. Where is the slider being used in the theme? Is it in a custom page template? Will there be multiple sliders? Multiple sliders in multiple templates? Is this a widget? Specifically, why does a slider exist at all in your theme? What value does it add your theme?

Right now, it sounds like you’re adding a slider just for the sake of having a slider as a theme feature.

You might not even need any options at all. I don’t add slider options in my themes. I tend to follow the WordPress philosophy of “make decisions, not options” in this regard.

Suppose you’re creating a custom “news” page template to be used on the front page of the site. A simple solution for this is to query the user’s sticky posts to view in the slider. It’s simple, users don’t have to jump through hoops to use it, and it works out of the box with standard WordPress features.

You could also give the same treatment to a “portfolio” slider. Just query the 5 latest portfolio items and have at it. This should be pretty simple assuming the portfolio plugin you’re using uses the standard post fields.

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greenshady says

That doesn’t really answer the question of the purpose of the slider. Why are you adding a slider to the theme? What type of content does each slide have?

From the sounds of it so far, especially if you’re dealing with CPTs and post meta, you should be building or integrating with a slider plugin.

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