Posts by greenshady

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greenshady says
So could you tell me one part of this theme which acutally is good enough?

I’m a fan of the color scheme.

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greenshady says

Don’t want to sound rude but I’ve seen some Free Themes out in the wild which are by far more better than that. I think that says all :S

That really says very little. There are 100s of free themes that are much better designed than many commercial ones. A theme’s price is not an indicator of quality.

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greenshady says

Here’s some feedback that I hope helps:

The typography needs the most work. Particularly, you need to get rid of justified text. It’s really messing up the flow of text on the page. If you’re going with so much bold, I’d recommend smaller font sizes. But, that may be just an issue with the justified text. I’d fix that first.

The widget titles just don’t work with the design.

Lists in widgets need some sort of indicator that they’re a list (bullet or something). I wasn’t able to find any other list examples, so I assume they’re given the same treatment??

Links need to have some sort of change when a user hovers them. This can be a color change or a text-decoration change.

The footer seems out of place, like it doesn’t fit with everything else.

The padding on the right side of the layout doesn’t match up with the left side.

The text in your main content area (single post view) is hard to read. I’d either make that area smaller or the font size larger.

Your breadcrumbs don’t work consistently across the site. On some pages, the page title in the breadcrumbs is linked; on others, it’s not. On things like date archives, you don’t really offer a “breadcrumb”. You just add a link to the home page and put the archive title in (check September 2012 archive, for example). Some archives don’t show a breadcrumb trail at all (author archive, for example).

You’re creating a news theme but the theme never shows the post dates. The date something was written is a major element that needs to be included with a news theme. Same thing with post authors. This is an important news element that’s missing completely.

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greenshady says

The first question to ask is: What is the purpose of a slider in this theme? Without knowing that, it’s impossible to answer the question correctly.

If you need something to manage slides, it should most likely be a plugin such as Meteor Slides or something like that. But, like I said, it’s going to depend entirely on what the theme needs it for.

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greenshady says

@rvision_

If you’d like to discuss the details of this work-in-progress plugin, feel free to submit changes on the GitHub page, start up another topic, or shoot me an email. I’d be more than happy to explain things or even take your ideas to make it better under consideration.

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greenshady says
You can’t rely on a simple regex text search to unveil the intentions of the theme code, can’t you? Thing is – code is much more complex than this. Therefore, this plugin can be considered as a joke, or a dumb tool.

If you have specific things you’d like to see changed about the plugin, join the Theme Review mailing list and voice your concerns.

No tool will ever be perfect when it comes to checking code for issues. The purpose of the Theme Check plugin is to catch as much stuff as it can and to issue notifications based on what it catches. It’s still up to the theme author and reviewer to manually look through the code, even see the “intention” of the code when there’s a possible issue. Theme Check is just a place to start. It’s not an end-all-be-all plugin for catching all issues.

The Theme Review team and many theme authors don’t think it’s a joke though. Since that script (wasn’t originally a plugin) was written and eventually turned into a plugin, it’s saved countless hours of reviewers’ time and helped many theme authors become better coders who adhere to WordPress standards. If you look at the quality of code of themes submitted to WordPress.org over the past two years, you’ll see a definite trend upwards. We owe much of that to the development of Theme Check.

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greenshady says

Can we stop with the “it can’t be done” attitude? No, it can’t be done if folks aren’t willing to try. There’s a lot of very smart people in the WordPress community. I’d wager there’s quite a few smart people in the ThemeForest section of that community too.

I agree that shortcodes should be bundled/used with content, not presentation. But there are some cases where this is simply not possible: for example, column shortcodes. Theme A uses 12 columns grid, theme B uses 16 columns grid. Make shortcodes work in both? I don’t think so.

I have a plugin I’m building where this will work in both Theme A, Theme B, as well as fall back gracefully to the plugin defaults with any other theme. I’m not sure about the policy of linking here in the forums, but it’s on my GitHub page.

The current problem with the column shortcode is that theme authors are making column shortcodes (plural). The original tutorial that nearly everyone here uses for this was poorly written. That tutorial has 20+ shortcodes when it should’ve only been 1, not to mention the other problems it causes. I’m seeking to fix this issue with my plugin, but it’s going to take some rethinking on the part of some theme authors.

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greenshady says

Just to clarify, the Theme Review page on the Codex does have a guideline referring to this discussion exactly. It’s pretty high up on the list of guidelines.

Presentation Vs. Functionality: Since the purpose of Themes is to define the presentation of user content, Themes must not be used to define the generation of user content, or to define Theme-independent site options or functionality.

As a guideline, that’s a great catchall rule and it allows the team some flexibility when new things come up. But, it’s not very specific about what those things are.

What I’d like to see on the Codex is an independent page that goes into greater detail about what this actually means.

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greenshady says

@epicenter

I’m a member of the WordPress.org theme review team. We’ll be more than happy to discuss this on the mailing list and update the theme review guidelines to address specifics if need be.

I would love to see the community get behind a free portfolio/gallery cpt plugin. This seems to be the most common content that would need moved from theme to theme.

As I mentioned to Steven earlier, I’ve got some ideas about this type of thing. A standard portfolio plugin is at the top of my ideas list too. Maybe I can get my blog post up in the next week or so about it. But, if you want to start up a new thread here in the forums and nail down some ideas about how portofolios should be handled, I’ll be more than happy to help out with it.

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greenshady says
If a theme has a CPT (or multiple CPT ’s) registered in a plugin then when a user switches to another theme they’ll still have access to their content in the WP admin. The new theme they switch to obviously won’t come with any way to show that content on the front-end. Is the whole idea 1) to give the site owner access to their content (even if just to copy/paste it elsewhere) and 2) to make those CPT ’s available for a new theme developer (assuming either the site owner or freelancer) to utilize? Am I missing the point? Is there more to this? The purpose of CPT ’s in a plugin is something I need to get my head around.

Both #1 and #2.

The major point is really about allowing the user having access to that content. Assuming the CPT uses the default WordPress fields (`post_content`, `post_title`, etc.), any standards-based theme will still show the CPT on the front end. Of course, a lot of this comes down to the individual CPT and how it should be implemented.

When you add a CPT to a plugin, the user will always have access to the content. Whether it looks good on the front end is a different story, but this is a good reason to start supporting plugins that offer some sort of standardization (like bbPress and WooCommerce).

I’ve got some ideas about making this a lot easier and better for the entire WP community. I just haven’t had the time to sit down and work on it.

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