Posts by greenshady

158 posts
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greenshady says

I work 12-16 hours/day about 4 days out of the week. The rest of the week I take it easy (relatively), sometimes only working about 4 hours. But, there are some weeks where I work 12+ hours each day for the entire week.

It varies a lot though and depends on what I’m working on. One week I might be editing someone’s book, developing a new theme/plugin, or just have loads of support questions to manage.

Overall, it doesn’t really matter when you’re doing something you enjoy.

158 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has referred 50+ members
  • Has sold $1,000+ on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
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greenshady says

I don’t know about Joomla or Magento, so I won’t address those.

But, the question is: Why would you want to? Plugins already have their place in WordPress. Theme developers have no business adding plugins within themes.

Assuming you did add a few plugins to your theme, do you really want the responsibility of maintaining and updating the plugin code?

158 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has referred 50+ members
  • Has sold $1,000+ on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
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greenshady says

@pamelarbaril

You are free to use any and/or all my code in your theme projects. I even encourage it. It’s why I license all my work under the GPL . As long as you also follow that license, you won’t have to worry about any technical or ethical issues.

158 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has referred 50+ members
  • Has sold $1,000+ on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
+1 more
greenshady says

The solution to the problem is pretty simple — stop trying to be plugin developers when you’re clearly not. Let plugins do their jobs and themes do their jobs.

Plugins are about the functionality of a site. Themes are about the presentation.

Until every theme developer here understands that basic concept or until the higher-ups at Envato start banning plugin functionality in themes, we’ll be stuck in this endless cycle of the same ol’ discussions about how crappy the code is in Theme Forest themes.

158 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has referred 50+ members
  • Has sold $1,000+ on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
+1 more
greenshady says

I’m fairly certain quite a few folks missed the point of the article and focused too much on the “classes” idea. If you fall into this group of people, please go back and read the article in full.

For utterly clueless noobs and advanced devs, shortcodes can be a great asset. I love them. It’s just a bad idea to add most of them in publicly-released themes. It’s plugin territory.

Plus, you can even sell your shortcodes plugin separately if you want in rake in a few more dollars. :)


It’s a good thing Justin Tadlock doesn’t have to pay his mortgage by competing for sales on TF.

I pay my mortgage through the theme business as well. I just don’t do it on Theme Forest.

Fortunately, I don’t have to add 100s of shortcodes to my themes to make money. If having piles of shortcodes is that big of a deal when it comes to your sales pitch, then you’re doing it wrong. There’s much more money to be made out there without having to compete feature for feature with all the other themes on ThemeForest.

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