Posts by greenshady

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greenshady says

You’re welcome to use any of my themes for free. Build on them. Resell them. Whatever you want as long as you follow the license (GPL) and pass on those same freedoms.

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greenshady says

I dropped IE8 earlier this year for public/commercial themes. I simply refuse to test against three versions of IE. I make my policy to only test against the latest two versions of IE pretty clear, so I don’t have much trouble with this.

Now, for client work, they get whatever they want to pay for. I’ll do IE5 if they feel like it’s worth the extra dev hours they’d have to pay me for.

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greenshady says


As has been mentioned many times over, the major problem is data portability. Once a user switches to another theme, that shortcode is broken. It’s the same with things like CPTs and taxonomies.

But at the end of the day, styling a theme is for the theme we have created, not to enhance another theme. Keeping data is one thing, making another theme look better and function better is another.

Im sure ThemeFusion will not want there shortcodes/functionality within other themes.

Dont get me wrong, I can see the benefits of this for the buyer, but I can see a ball ache for developers when users come back saying, it does not look right… Their past content from the theme the developer created on a new theme some other developer created, and vise versa.

At the end of the day, it’s what’s best for users. The higher-ups here are TF realize that and are finally doing something about it. They realize they need to quit screwing users over and play nice with the rest of the WordPress development community. It’ll be better for long-term business.

Put all other arguments aside. What is best for the users? Not just short term but long term as well?


From the 5 years Ive been on WordPress I have never had any support/client ever ask:

“Why is my shortcodes not working on my new theme”.

Or

“Why is my old portfolio not showing” etc etc etc…

When people buy a new theme, it generally is to provide a new presence and not to use old content.

I’ve been doing this longer than 5 years and have had those exact questions. Many, many times. More than 90% of the time, these questions are from users who were previously using a ThemeForest theme.

When people install a new theme, it’s generally to provide a new look for their existing content.

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greenshady says


is TGM mandatory ? say i don’t need all TGM features but can obtain the only ones i’m interested in with simpler (custom) code, would that be a problem ?
I’d love to know why you’d want to write custom code for this rather than using an existing, recommended, class?

The big thing is that you can write something simpler to handle what you need. Otto has a great tutorial on this: http://ottopress.com/2012/themeplugin-dependencies/

Another thing is that writing competing code can often spur innovation. Many developers are interested in plugin/theme dependency these days, especially with things like CPTs, so limiting devs to using one class can actually stifle innovation in this area. Obviously, you’d want to check the code for security issues, but it’d be neat to see other solutions to the dependency issue.


I coopearate with one TF elite author, i’m responsible for coding from PSD to template and to WP theme. After a couple of years and almost 10 000 sales / 5 000 comments (and i don’t know how many mails) we’ve never had any single question like this: “Hey, i change theme to another, where are my shortcodes?”...

You don’t get those questions. Those questions get passed on to developers like me who handle your users after they stop using your themes. We have to help those users clean up the mess.


To me, themeforest are basically not creating themes anymore…

They want us to create skins, with plugins.

For instance a theme has all logic and styling where as a skin has just styling.

Correct me if I am wrong?

For me this seems to be going away from WordPress standards, as WordPress state that all functions should be within the functions.php of the theme, yet we are now segregating them into a plugin.implemented.

Essentially, the WordPress theme system is a system for creating “skins”.

The best way to think about a theme is that anything within your theme folder should deal with the visual display of the site. Anything else should go within a plugin.



A theme deals with the visual aspects of a WordPress install, and plugins add functionality.
So, why shortcodes must be in plugin? Shortcodes like dropcap, buttons, tables, columns, boxes etc. it’s all visual elements, not functional. They don’t provide any functionality, they just look.

As has been mentioned many times over, the major problem is data portability. Once a user switches to another theme, that shortcode is broken. It’s the same with things like CPTs and taxonomies.



Our policy, is that it is required. As with the requirement for curly braces. It improves overall readability, and there’s no good reason not to include it.
Curly braces requirement is nuisance, IMHO. Who says it improves overall readability? For me, it’s quite opposite – I have two braces more to “process” to figure out what is going on.

Agreed.

Just as a heads up, I leave off braces where appropriate in my Hybrid Core framework, so the themes that use it here would no longer be able to use it or would have change the code in the framework, which would defeat the purpose of using the framework.

Plus, WordPress PHP coding standards allow for no braces when you have single-line blocks: http://make.wordpress.org/core/handbook/coding-standards/php/#brace-style
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greenshady says

You have a mistake in the PHP section #5, which conflicts with the “child theme” rule. Your code:

<img src="<?php echo get_stylesheet_directory_uri(); ?>/images/filename.png" />

Instead of using get_stylesheet_directory_uri(), themes should almost always use get_template_directory_uri().

I know this is just an example, but if you want to facilitate the use of child themes, the themes here need to be referencing the correct directory.

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greenshady says


WordPress.org theme reviewer here. Just know that your free theme will most likely undergo additional scrutiny during the review process on WordPress.org, and you must select the 100% GPL license for the paid version of the theme on ThemeForest. Otherwise, it won’t be allowed on WordPress.org. You also can’t hide any default WordPress features that exist in the paid version behind a paywall (for example, the custom header or custom background features if you use them). If those features exist in your paid version, they must also exist in your free version.

Thanks for the reply Justin!

But, I’m not following the second part… What exactly do you mean under “hide features”?

A few examples:

  • Custom header
  • Custom background
  • Post formats

Basically, if your paid theme supports these types of features but your free theme doesn’t, it won’t be allowed. I’m specifically referring to core WordPress features. Other features don’t matter.

Here’s the guideline on that: http://codex.wordpress.org/Theme_Review#Up-Sell_Themes


Maybe it is different with themes but, aren’t many of plugin authors do the similar thing? Release free plugin on WordPress.org then premium version with extended features somewhere else?

I can’t speak specifically about plugins since I’m not involved in their approval process. Many of the same rules generally apply, but themes are held to a much stricter set of standards. Extended/additional features are fine though.

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greenshady says
Considering a custom post types and taxonomies shouldn’t be within a theme in the first place, you should check out this plugin, which will allow you to create an unlimited number of portfolios: http://wordpress.org/plugins/custom-content-portfolio/
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greenshady says

WordPress.org theme reviewer here. Just know that your free theme will most likely undergo additional scrutiny during the review process on WordPress.org, and you must select the 100% GPL license for the paid version of the theme on ThemeForest. Otherwise, it won’t be allowed on WordPress.org.

You also can’t hide any default WordPress features that exist in the paid version behind a paywall (for example, the custom header or custom background features if you use them). If those features exist in your paid version, they must also exist in your free version.

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greenshady says

I dropped support of IE8 last year. I haven’t had any complaints.

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greenshady says

Basically, child theme support means that the theme was coded properly using WordPress standards for loading template files. WordPress has several template-file loading functions that should be used within [parent] themes so that child themes can overwrite these templates if need be.

Essentially, all correctly-coded themes support child themes. There really shouldn’t be a need to announce that the theme supports child themes.

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