Posts by horizonq8

33 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
  • Has collected 100+ items on Envato Market
  • Located in United Kingdom
horizonq8 says

It’s all about the buyers , without you all of this would be meaningless…
So , buyers , how do you buy..?
Considering which criterias..?
Are you (or CAN you) using the SEARCH option..?
What makes you buy from the same author again and again , and vice versa..?
What features you want (or do not want) to see at the marketplaces..?
There are many questions can be added , so this is your thread , I think any feedback would be helpful to all of the community.
Bedros

1. When buying themes – I rarely use the search – Envato search is rather limited. Works for plugins but not templates.

2. Sadly, only 2 authors, after nearly 200 purchases, made enough of an impression on me to buy more then one product from them.

3. Having made quite a few not so fortunate buys over the years I got smarter (or so I think haha). I now browse the comments extensively:

a.  if an author refuses support in the comments, I move on - I understand it's not the best platform for it, but none offer access to forums pre purchase, and having been burned, repeatedly, I now only go for those that remain transparent about their product.
b.  if an author is rude in the comments, I move on.
c.  if an author can't be spotted for a month in the comments - I run.

4. I’ve learned not to pay any attention whatsoever to good star ratings, badges, titles, what not.

5. I look at a product change log, in case of scripts or themes.

6. I look at comments on other author items if there are any.

7. I ask pre-sales questions. I do make very biased judgments based on response received.

8. In case of popular themes, I recently started Googling for opinions. l wish I have thought about it sooner. Would’ve saved myself few hundred dollars ;)

9. It bothers me if people practically copy the design of others – I avoid such author’s like a plague. If you have that sort of attitude towards a fellow author, I don’t have much hope of being treated well as a customer :p

Most items I buy are either WP themes or plugins, and an occasional script or graphic. I’d happily pay double for every single item on here if it meant higher quality control and better motivation for the authors. I don’t think Envato’s cut is proportional, in any way, to the service provided. To either side.

More details on WP themes here – http://themeforest.net/forums/thread/humble-request-to-all-wordpress-authors/148538?page=1.

It’s great to see people asking questions, thanks!

33 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
  • Has collected 100+ items on Envato Market
  • Located in United Kingdom
horizonq8 says

Theme authors, stop trying to compete on “features” (strong word, it’s plugin bundling really) and work on design and proper features. I haven’t bough a “multi purpose” theme and never will, I look for items which fit the niche I am building for.

That is what I did 3 years in a row. And I find it tiring. Once an author cashes in on sales for a niche product, support generally goes downhill – and by support I mean keepin an eye of depreciated WP functions etc. Nothin out of the ordinary. If I use a niche theme, I am bound by a dedicated, custom coded post type specific to the theme. I do can not on a whim, when in need of updating the visual design, simply swap templates. It requires a database import of over a thousand entries with nearly 5k photos. That’s 1 site only.

It would be less of a problem if these niche themes were coded in a standard way. CPT named whatever, pulling galleries from within post attachments etc. None of the ones I tried where. Each had a different approach to the same WP functionality – usually needlessly complicating the issue. That’s what prompted me to look for a generic theme and self code a plugin to go with all that allows me to move my chunk of the database easily.

That said, I still need to deal with non standard coding even when it comes to basic features of generic templates haha.

33 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
  • Has collected 100+ items on Envato Market
  • Located in United Kingdom
horizonq8 says


5. Forbid multipurpose themes.
You know, multipurpose doesn’t really mean bloat. In terms of design, multipurpose means exactly just that. A theme with a flexible yet un-niched design. I see nothing wrong with generic themes. Having tons of built-in bloat, that’s something else. This issue is with coding standards actually, not the multipurpose scope of design.

Could not agree more – multi purpose is great. It does not mean it should be able to do everything out of the box – serve a restaurant, a church, an agency and a pub. Rather means it can be used for any of the above with simple customization. At least that’s how I see it :).

Guess it’s one of those terms different people perceive in different ways.

33 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
  • Has collected 100+ items on Envato Market
  • Located in United Kingdom
horizonq8 says

Cheers for reading and your input. As a poster above said, even just reading your feedback to my post, will influence my decision on the next buy. Already have a favorite from the few authors that replied;)

I am not familiar with Envato’s review process, but being a not so proud owner of some horrible templates, I’m inclined to think it is heavily procedure reliant and has very little to do with actual quality control.

Envato is definitely guilty of promoting authors based on number of sales, not quality of their work. When a relatively fresh to the market buyer first hops in, seeing Elite Author badge is most likely considered a good sign. Elite, the word, is associated with something special, out of ordinary, of high quality. In this case, in many cases, it’s plain misleading. Please forgive me if you have one, I know some of you lot rock, sadly, not all.

If any of the fat theme sellers allowed access to their support forum pre-purchase – they would not be where they are now :p

I’ve taken my chances with a couple of them. Prepared to heavily customize and/or de-bloat. Little did I know what a cluster f….of code mess these themes are. I think I’d happily pay Envato to remove them permanently from my downloads list. Still, I’m one of the 50k buyers.

Judging by support forums, there is plenty of people like me – wishing they never made the purchase. Not because 60 USD is hard to swallow, but to get rid of that awful feeling that we somehow contributed to promoting this type of work/design; continuously misleading new buyers and spinning that wheel. Unfortunately, in many cases, you can’t really know until you try.

Still, I personally believe there is a lot of money to be made by slightly more modular approach.

Someone mentioned a simple theme that is meant as a framework would not pass Envato review. Would be great to hear a staff answer on that.

Though I’d imagine, even if that were the case, bundling it with a simplified version of your premium plugin or two, just for the purpose of showcasing the abilities, would do the trick. Then simultaneously with the theme, release 2/3 premium plugins increasing functionality – whatever it is that you may have in mind. The total price of the modules combined with the theme is meant to be higher that one monster template.

There are a couple of authors that I came across that did it with plugins on Code Canyon – release the main plugin, that periodically extend it’s functionality via paid addons. So we know, for a fact, that it’s doable on Envato.

Guess it will take one author to be successful in that sort of approach to get things spinning in favour of common sense. I also do realize it’s easier said then done. We all have families to feed. Sometimes doing what’s right is not what can easily be done from a perspective of an individual author, for many valid reason. Economically, it may seem best to go with the flow. I can’t really guarantee otherwise, I’m just 1 buyer. I know I’m not alone, but I don’t have any numbers to make it more appealing.

I do however, believe, that with the right presentation of merits of simple design complemented by premium features when/if required it is possible, over time, to swing the buying masses, to the light side of the moon.

33 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
  • Has collected 100+ items on Envato Market
  • Located in United Kingdom
horizonq8 says

Hello there,

A few words from an avid buyer to the authors of Wordpress themes and plugins :) Trying to bite into a new project – refreshing several of my websites, over the last couple of weeks I’ve been growing increasingly frustrated.

There are many lovely templates and useful plugins on the market place, sadly, majority follows the same format – massive bloat.

Truth is, no matter what you do, you will not be able to please every buyer. Even within the same industry/niche, people have varied requirements. We proceed to buy what we think is the most suitable template/plugin – get excited, download, install and then the pain of customization starts.

It usually turns out we need at most one slider from the 5 available, none of the templates allow for adding custom taxonomies, god forbid custom coded post type. Moving onto digging into the code to try to hook our stuff into the template usually results in banging our heads on a wall, repeatedly, trying to figure out why instead of using wordpress standards authors come up with massively convoluted ways of implementing basic wordpress functionality – recent example, one of the bestselling themes ever on Envato – registering their own custom taxonomy in 3 different places – don’t even know how that solution manages to actually work without causing internal conflicts. What this leads to is buyers flooding the forums with customization questions driving author’s mad and usually receiving a short reply : this is outside the scope of support. Now, I can’t blame you. There is no way in hell, 1 person or a tiny team of devs could stay sane guiding even 1 out of 10 buyers through the complexities of their own code.

In any case, whining is pointless without out an attempted solution to the issues. And I personally think it’s rather simple and beneficial to both parties :)

1. Design and code a theme in a very basic form – covering all the necessities (basic WP functionality, few standard page templates) and flexible layouts with the ability to apply them to whatever post type/taxonomy, showcase what the framework is capable of – you use conditional statements in code anyhow, you are perfectly capable to apply them to your custom post types by providing a select box in theme options – why not extend that to be able to read from whatever WP post/term?

2. Design and code plugins for it – you want to include a portfolio CPT made by you? Sure, go for it – make your CPT a plugin – not only you give buyers the flexibility whether to use your solution or not, you keep the base framework clean and fast for those that opt not to, and you make money on the plugin off those that need that particular functionality. Win, win? :) That applies to every single template out there trying to be either an all rounder, or catering to specific niche.

Example : a hugely successful real estate theme – brilliant, but limited sales wise to the author, because it only serves real estate/potentially tourism – now, car dealers, restaurants, any sort of listings imaginable, all work pretty much the same way in the back end – you need a custom post type, custom taxonomies, custom fields, and a filter method of some sort to go with it – why restrict yourself to one industry only when you could be making money of the framework serving anyone under the sun, by simply making appropriate plugins to compliment your awesome design? So make a real estate plugin for starters, if you feel that’s a good market, then make car dealership plugin and see how that sells. The possibilities are endless with a modular approach.

3. Galleries – same solution as above – plugin format goes a long way – rarely do we need half a dozen of different gallery formats – we all need and like different things – put it in a paid plugin, let buyers have a choice, and get paid for your efforts. Keep the prices at a rational level, and most theme users will buy them as they come out, just in case, to try them out.

4. New features – great, sometimes you simply don’t think of a particular feature and later find out, half of your potential clients ask about it in pre-sales questions. Why spend your time, adding it for free – make a plugin.

Despite the popular belief the plugins weigh down a WP install, truth is, a well coded plugin will weigh it down no more then when it’s hard coded into the theme. And being able to selectively add functionality that one needs, actually contributes to a way better theme performance over all, more than carrying the baggage of all those features you will never use, all those js scripts loaded on every page just in case ;)

And last but not least – mobile capability. Sadly, as awesome as responsive/fluid design is in theory, in practice, a brilliantly performing, well designed responsive theme with all sorts of fireworks that look great on a large screen and perform great on broadband connections, simply chokes on mobile.

And here I go again with two potential solutions – a dedicated mobile version of your theme for easy swapping, or the ability to “turn off” certain features below certain screen resolutions.

Out of all the templates that I’ve purchased over the years, only one theme club does it that way. It works brilliantly. I’ve recently decided to move one of my sites to one of their themes and it’s been a breeze of fresh air when it comes to mobile performance. Their clients are happy, and they are probably even happier counting sales ;) Their plugins cost way more then any WP stuff on CodeCanyon – and people do buy.

I’m not loosing hope that the mentality of design in regards to Wordpress will change a bit. Sadly, nowhere near enough buyers bother with those forums as such there is very little discussion between authors and client – and I find this is what we could use the most.

Just one more suggestion to Envato staff – maybe a little email campaign encouraging buyers to participate in the forums – or potentially creating one dedicated to buyers concerns and suggestions, would be a good idea to get people in here and start communicating. It would benefit all 3 sides ;)

Cheers! .

33 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
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  • Located in United Kingdom
horizonq8 says




Why would I want to refund someone since he got what he paid for?

Very true – let’s look at the situation in another real-life scenario:

A person buys a t-shirt at a clothing store and then starts harassing the shop with weird requests like:

“Why doesn’t my t-shirt have a hoody and long sleeves?”
“I like the colour, but it’s not really what i need..”
If you don’t stitch sleeves and a hoody to my t-shirt, i will write bad reviews about you all over the internet.

The refund solution proposed here would be equivalent to the shop owner telling the client:

“Here’s your money back, keep the t-shirt and get out of my face, don’t come back.

Bottom line, the shop has lost the value of 1 t-shirt, is not happy, the buyer is probably not happy either.

I still like the possiblity to force a refund, as i had a few buyers wherei would have happily given a refund rather than keep bending backwards to try and please them.. but still.. the whole concept of refunding a digital asset is wrong.

It’s like asking for a refund for a meal at the restaurant because you didn’t enjoy it.

Hardly a good example mate – I can try the tshirt and see if it fits me, try it. Don’t have to rely only on the fact that it looks good. In case of most items, there isn’t an admin demo. I have no means of knowing, if say, the WP plugin I buy, will work with my setup.

You’d need a big disclaimer on every piece of script on Envato before thinking about about blocking buyers from authors just because the asked for a refund of an item.

How would that work for product marketing? “This is a standalone script. Despite being made to work with Worpdress, we can only hope it works with the core of the CMS and the default theme. You’re on your own after the purchase”.

Probably not so well lol.

There is no need to go to extremes when searching for a solution. Middle ground is obtainable. Atm, Envato seems to only consider either alienating authors by ridiculously long forced support, or buyers, by not doing anything rational about lack of it. I’d drop the two options, and start from scratch. Someone needs to take a step back and look at the whole picture.

You are wrong in my opinion. His example is actually very good.

Hardly a good example mate – I can try the tshirt and see if it fits me, try it. Don’t have to rely only on the fact that it looks good. In case of most items, there isn’t an admin demo. I have no means of knowing, if say, the WP plugin I buy, will work with my setup.
Every author specifies the requirements for that product to work. If you meet those requirements then it will work, if it doesn’t work then it means is something wrong with the product, and you are eligible for a refund already as per the Knowledgebase. Not to mention that the Items are being tested before being approved, and 90% of them have a demo already.

I wish that was true. Sadly, that is very often not the case. Especially products that require a framework of some sort to work with, like a CMS. From my personal experience, very few authors bother running their ready templates/plugins through an array of widely available tools to actually make sure their work adheres to the best coding practice for a particular framework.

I always test all wordpress plugin with a fresh WP install on the default theme. The amount of them that cause issues with the basic setup is overwhelming.

Similarly, templates – design wise, some are gorgeous looking, try to run a random template through Google Page Speed Insights or simply open the web console in the browser and chances, you’ll be greeted with elementary css or js errors, are great.

Slapping on what’s required to run a script is not always enough, there are too many external factors to be considered.

While I can’t rationally expect an author to take every scenario into consideration, neither can the author expect his plugin will work out of the box in any environment that meets the requirements.

That’s when support is needed. Often not even to solve a problem, but simply point out where it lies and allow the buyer to deal with it or make a choice whether to continue attempting to use it or not.

Very few plugins have admin demos. Those that do, generally sell way better. You can quite easily verify it if you have the time ;)

Until you buy the template/plugin and get to the back-end, there is a very big risk it won’t work in your environment. Sure, I can request a refund. Easy enough if I can present the product does not work for a specific reason. But plenty of authors here are quite happy to work with buyers to make it work instead of throwing their money back at them blindly. If I try on a tshirt, I know right then and there if it fits or not. The same can’t be said about a lot of products on the market place.

I never look at star reviews when buying a plugin – unless it’s no more then 1 with a big number of sales. I do look in the comments section. Any author that is not particularly happy to reply to questions, arrogant or dismissive, I simply avoid, regardless of how good their product may seem, how many sales or stars it received. Similarly, someone with 3 stars but active in the comments, I’ll take the plunge any day if I think what is offered is what I need.

And lastly, while I do not think such a long obligatory support period is healthy, truth is, that regardless of Envato’s internal policies, buyers are protected by commercial laws. The fact that you are selling on the internet, and not in a shop, does not mean it isn’t regulated. If something does not work as intended, you are legally obliged to make it work or eventually refund. Envato is registered in Australia, and bound by local consumer laws. Extended support is an option, basic, if the customer can prove you in the wrong, is a consumer right. As long as you charge for your products, you create commercial obligations that you may be asked to fullfill. They are not always rational, but it’s something any business has to deal with, individual or corporate.

33 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
  • Has collected 100+ items on Envato Market
  • Located in United Kingdom
horizonq8 says


Why would I want to refund someone since he got what he paid for?

Very true – let’s look at the situation in another real-life scenario:

A person buys a t-shirt at a clothing store and then starts harassing the shop with weird requests like:

“Why doesn’t my t-shirt have a hoody and long sleeves?”
“I like the colour, but it’s not really what i need..”
If you don’t stitch sleeves and a hoody to my t-shirt, i will write bad reviews about you all over the internet.

The refund solution proposed here would be equivalent to the shop owner telling the client:

“Here’s your money back, keep the t-shirt and get out of my face, don’t come back.

Bottom line, the shop has lost the value of 1 t-shirt, is not happy, the buyer is probably not happy either.

I still like the possiblity to force a refund, as i had a few buyers wherei would have happily given a refund rather than keep bending backwards to try and please them.. but still.. the whole concept of refunding a digital asset is wrong.

It’s like asking for a refund for a meal at the restaurant because you didn’t enjoy it.

Hardly a good example mate – I can try the tshirt and see if it fits me, try it. Don’t have to rely only on the fact that it looks good. In case of most items, there isn’t an admin demo. I have no means of knowing, if say, the WP plugin I buy, will work with my setup.

You’d need a big disclaimer on every piece of script on Envato before thinking about about blocking buyers from authors just because the asked for a refund of an item.

How would that work for product marketing? “This is a standalone script. Despite being made to work with Worpdress, we can only hope it works with the core of the CMS and the default theme. You’re on your own after the purchase”.

Probably not so well lol.

There is no need to go to extremes when searching for a solution. Middle ground is obtainable. Atm, Envato seems to only consider either alienating authors by ridiculously long forced support, or buyers, by not doing anything rational about lack of it. I’d drop the two options, and start from scratch. Someone needs to take a step back and look at the whole picture.

33 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
  • Has collected 100+ items on Envato Market
  • Located in United Kingdom
horizonq8 says


Another problem I see, a lot of longer tracks fall into what I call an indefinite loop – same sounds, chords reused with slight variation to make the piece longer. Outside of catchy electronic music, it doesn’t work so well.

Thanks for posting this, it’s always interesting to hear buyers’ insights into what they think works and what doesn’t. I always assume that the vast majority of people on the forums here are authours, which is probably why you don’t see many people asking buyers what they are looking for and why people just follow the trend of writing what is selling at that time (after all, if it’s selling, there must be demand right?).


Finding a quality background composition that’s longer then 4 minutes, doesn’t loop every 40seconds, provides enough variation to be pleasant to the ear, consistent in tone/mood while at the same time not overwhelming the visual it will be accompanying is not easy.

Yep, totally agree on this. However, the general consensus is that the format for stock music tracks needs to be consistent and maintain the ‘vibe’ or ‘energy’ without too many changes which is why many people end up repeating the structure. I agree that this means we often end up with musically dull and uninteresting tracks, but the format needs to work for people looking to edit the track into their productions and have something that fits under a voice over.


Create something that’s original, that stands out, be it a visual or audio composition. There is this strange ‘sheep’ trend

I would love to see more original and creatively adventurous music being made here, but sadly, that type of approach doesn’t seem to lead to sales here. I know, as I’ve put up tracks that fit in that category, would work well in a film or an experimental arthouse production. But the people who purchase here (or the curators who influence who is a top seller) don’t seem to agree that tracks like that deserve sales.

At the end of the day, authours want to make music that sells. If that leads to a ‘sheep mentality’ making music (which inevitably it does in most cases), then I can’t see things changing soon.

Cheers for addressing the points. And you are right, there aren’t many buyers around which I think is a great shame. It would be mutually beneficial to have a proper dialogue I think.

Exposure is definitely a massive issue with AJ – no other market place has the problem to such extend, simply because a lot of it are visuals and don’t require massive amounts of time to look through, unlike actually listening to tracks. There is very little you can do to promote your work on Envato other then within the boundaries set by the market place, however, having a YT channel, or whatever the music equivalent is, escaped my mind now, does not hurt. I find a lot of authors that sell on AJ are not present anywhere else. There is nothing stopping you guys being active on social media or any sort of other online presence even if it means a little free marketing to Envato as some are bound by exclusive agreements. You can do a lot to address exposure across the internet in general. But yes, it requires time and to an extend resources.

I enjoy the community that we have here, I do agree a lot more should be done to address issues specific to AJ – I would not be opposed to imposing a restriction that obliges buyers to give credits to certain products at the end of their projects. But that’s not a black and white situation either.

I have to say I did not realize producing out of the box pieces is not very well received by the current structure. It’s a great shame.

However, in response to this:

At the end of the day, authours want to make music that sells. If that leads to a ‘sheep mentality’ making music (which inevitably it does in most cases), then I can’t see things changing soon.

I’d say artists do that quite often.

What brought on my reply to that topic, is the observations a number of people made about low sales. I’ve looked through few of the posters portfolios just now, there is some great stuff. Already bookmarked two compilations for a future project, however, just the quick glance shows a lot of short commercial work that doesn’t sell well either.

Guess Envato is the only one that has the complete picture, and based on that should address exposure strategies. Possibly going a bit further out with their marketing, beyond the market place. Afterall, that’s the purpose of the platform, and judging by general sales, money to invest is not an issue. The question is, is there will :) More flexible licensing options would certainly not hurt either.

33 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
  • Has collected 100+ items on Envato Market
  • Located in United Kingdom
horizonq8 says

I’m glad to see changes are being thought off in regards to support as I am a buyer, a lack of post sale support is my biggest fear when purchasing anything on any of the market places except AJ. At the same time, I do realize buyers can be extremely irrational, demanding, to the point of ridiculous entitlement.

I’m not sure the issue is being looked at as a whole. It’s not just a support problem. In fact, support can be quite easily cleverly addressed by the authors themselves – many already have outstanding solution, it’s mind boggling while others don’t.

1. Dedicated support forums – 5USD for hosting and an open source SMF2 forum that can be knocked up and setup in less then couple of hours leads to peer2peer support taking the strain off the authors. 2. Clear support guidelines on Envato product page. 3. Good documentation 4. Clear support rules on the forums informing users how things work. 5. Efficient search – tho that comes with forum software, so it’s worth using a well developed one such as the one mentioned above. 6. Premium access to dedicated extra support/customization forums.

I bought around 200 items. Probably half of those require some form of support at some point (plugins, scripts, templates). Few authors have the above setup or a variation that works just brilliantly. I honestly don’t think I ever had to bother with a direct email/ticket to any of those authors because the resources are there, and chances are, someone has already had that particular problem, or simply volunteers to provide a solution.

Something to think about if you’re an author before your sales go through the roof. A ticketing system might seem attractive but it’s only beneficial to one person – open support benefits everyone. I will never understand why many authors prefer a closed ticketing platform to a forum. If you’re clear and open about the rules, the product will quite happily start to support itself to an extend – even if you’re on vacation, you can still access the forums from any device, throw a tip or two, ask others to help and point the lost soul to the right solution that is already there or simply search,m copy and paste yourself.

Now, the sales model in my opinion is a little outdated and the main culprit. Software continuously evolves, CMS change, update, things become obsolete etc. It’s irrational to expect continuous updates for a plugin or a script for an indefinite amount of time. By the same token, from a buyer’s perspective, I am not interested in paying 20 dollars only to have the script work for 6 months and then be unusable – by that time, it’s usually already an integral part of a bigger project and replacing it with something else is a massive hassle.

A lot of easily avoidable security issues are caused by businesses using freelancer or agency services that rely on templates of all sorts to create an online presence. Once the project is complete, neither the clients, nor the devs ever look back – never update, until it’s too late.

What I’d like to see is continuous development. For that to happen, there needs to be a financial incentive for the authors – everyone has families to feed and/or bills to pay. Ideally, the initial price tag would cover version 1.0 plus a short period of guaranteed support and all necessary bug fixes (say 3 months). Every major update should be paid for – be it extra features, major code updates due to api changes or things outside the author’s control, and come with the same guaranteed short term support.

I know I can’t speak for all buyers, I’m but one person using the market place for my own business and hobbies – but I would quite happily pay per major update.

Authors would have an incentive and well deserved revenues, while buyers gain basic guaranteed support while retaining the ability to decide whether to update or not.

On going premium support – sure, but is there really a large market for it? I obviously don’t have access to any Envato data – but even assuming majority of buyers are developers, not individual customers, how many do you think are willing to continuously pay for premium support for tenths of items at a time? I somehow can’t imagine it will be many – what is more likely to happen, is people choosing the lowest possible payment option to get what they are after, alternatively, continue pestering authors for answers via email, comments or these very forums. Premium support at the market place is a good idea, but it may turn out to be a logistical nightmare for Envato. considering they are barely managing their own support efficiently. It would just seem easier to revamp the sales part and provide support guidelines for authors but leave the execution to the clients.

And lastly, regardless of what the solution turns out to be, I sincerely hope some sort of filtering for the comments section will be available – I really would love to be able to search if a question was already asked and answered, instead of bothering the author about something silly, but atm, I can only use Google, and hope particular item had enough sales and comments to actually rank in g search to point me to the right page out of the 100 in the comment section.

33 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
  • Has collected 100+ items on Envato Market
  • Located in United Kingdom
horizonq8 says

From a buyers perspective – buying tracks is tricky. I buy music for 2 purposes, one is professional and one is private. The first, for company presentation background music, the second, as background music for game play videos – and I have recently realized looking back at my spendings – that AJ is very cost inefficient.

Started looking for alternatives and very quickly found quite a few. From Creative commons licensed pieces that seem just perfect for the gaming videos, to better licensed Royalty Free options outside of Envato, that allow me to reuse the same track in different projects. Yes they are slightly pricier, but they come with flexibility.

Another problem I see, a lot of longer tracks fall into what I call an indefinite loop – same sounds, chords reused with slight variation to make the piece longer. Outside of catchy electronic music, it doesn’t work so well.

Finding a quality background composition that’s longer then 4 minutes, doesn’t loop every 40seconds, provides enough variation to be pleasant to the ear, consistent in tone/mood while at the same time not overwhelming the visual it will be accompanying is not easy.

In my eyes, AJ is great for corporate and artsy/cinematic intros, logo reveals, short adverts – where it fails, is not enough good quality longer pieces/songs.

And from an individual buyer’s point of view – I only needed 1 corporate logo reveal, 1 intro for my gaming YT channel videos. Both are great, I will not be changing them any time soon as there is little point.

It may sound a little harsh, but I find there is a lot of sound on AJ and some of it is absolutely brilliant, however, there is not enough music.

There is a multitude of threads across all Envato forums complaining about sales, yet I never see any in which potential authors would maybe ask the buyers, what they are after. Create something that’s original, that stands out, be it a visual or audio composition. There is this strange ‘sheep’ trend – the moment a particular kind of item is successful in sales, give it a month, and tenths of other similar ones start to pop up everywhere. To an extend it’s good – creates a healthy competition and, at least in theory, elevates the standards, however, sooner or later, chances are market will become saturated and sales are meant to slow down for some, or even a lot of authors. Until a next wave, if it comes.

Just my 2 cents :)

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