Posts by hugw

8 posts
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  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 4 years
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hugw says

What the…? The theme options panel in a plugin? Really? The theme options are related to only that specific theme, not to any other, so what’s the point in having it in a plugin? WTF?

Theme Options will stay on your theme. Shortcodes, CPTs and Metaboxes are moving to a plugin.

8 posts
  • Has sold $5,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 4 years
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
+1 more
hugw says


I totally agree with the new guidelines. But, i am a little bit concerned about user experience. Imagine this scenario:

Common user, that does not know nothing about what is meta boxes, custom post type, shortcodes, widgets. One day this user buy a theme A, after the installation, he is asked to install a bunch of plugins too, then he do.

Plugins:

- A MetaBoxes - A Custom Post Type - A ShortCodes - A Widgets

Then, he change his mind and buy another theme, B. Oh, and he is asked to install another bunch of plugins too.

- B Widgets - B ShortCodes - B Misc.

I can keep this forever, but lets say, he stops on the fourth theme. And suddenly he realize that his admin has 3 “Portfolios” menu itens, 2 “Sliders” menus and worst, when he try to add a new Post, he discovers a lot of custom fields that he does not know how to get rid off.

In the end, there will be maybe 20-30 plugins installed, and probably with common names like “Nice ShortCodes” or “Awsome ShortCodes”. How the “noob” user, will know how to deal with that information?

I think this is an interesting point. Even though an author only create a few plugins (say 1-2 plugins) to be using with his/her theme, end users still get a number of unwanted and useless plugins installed after switching themes.

By the concept that a theme must port all functionality into plugins, the users are “forced” to install and use the plugins that come with the theme in the first place (*Well, actually they are not forced to and they can choose not to install any, but in order to make the theme works as promoted, they couldn’t refuse right? :) ).

Also, since those theme-specific plugins serve only the functionality and styles for their own brand/theme, they might be useless to be used on any other themes. Unlike other general plugins on repository or other premium third-party plugins that are designed to be used as “stand alone” and independent.

So, how can authors prevent the situation that the users will have useless theme-specific plugins installed after switching the themes?

P.S. I’m all in for the new requirements and that’s totally great for most authors to comply with standards. I think Envato is surely going to the right direction in a long-term business. But there’s just something still unclear to me. :)

Scenario:

The user install five themes, loop trough each one and decide to take the last one and all plugins (from each theme) are now enabled. Imagine the “Add new Post” page, 3 to 5 blocks of metaboxes, how the user will know which metabox is related to the current theme?

Imho Envato needs to elaborate some specific rules about naming metaboxes, cpts, shortcodes, to avoid this kind of situation.

8 posts
  • Has sold $5,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 4 years
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
+1 more
hugw says

I totally agree with the new guidelines. But, i am a little bit concerned about user experience. Imagine this scenario:

Common user, that does not know nothing about what is meta boxes, custom post type, shortcodes, widgets. One day this user buy a theme A, after the installation, he is asked to install a bunch of plugins too, then he do.

Plugins:

- A MetaBoxes - A Custom Post Type - A ShortCodes - A Widgets

Then, he change his mind and buy another theme, B. Oh, and he is asked to install another bunch of plugins too.

- B Widgets - B ShortCodes - B Misc.

I can keep this forever, but lets say, he stops on the fourth theme. And suddenly he realize that his admin has 3 “Portfolios” menu itens, 2 “Sliders” menus and worst, when he try to add a new Post, he discovers a lot of custom fields that he does not know how to get rid off.

In the end, there will be maybe 20-30 plugins installed, and probably with common names like “Nice ShortCodes” or “Awsome ShortCodes”. How the “noob” user, will know how to deal with that information?

8 posts
  • Has sold $5,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 4 years
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
+1 more
hugw says

Definitely docs :)

8 posts
  • Has sold $5,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 4 years
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
+1 more
hugw says

The Twitter REST API v1 will officially retire on Tuesday, May 7, 2013.

https://dev.twitter.com/blog/api-v1-retirement-final-dates
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