Posts by mbudm

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mbudm says

Ya, that’s what I was thinking… no chance for one day on the home page per file, but what about the two streams idea, has that been mulled over before?

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mbudm says

I think you can divide files on FD into two categories…complex and simple, over $10 and under $10. Also I think that the under $10 files (the vast majority) are a boon for flashden in getting traffic to the site via search engine (via the long tail). So it seems to me that it wouldn’t adversely affect FD overall if the following was set up.

Why not have two streams of new files on the homepage? Over $10 and under $10 (or some other labels that describe the files better). That way the more complex files won’t get so lost in the mountain of smaller files, that I feel are going to get most of their sales from SEO traffic down the track anyway. Whereas files that have a lot of work in them are really nice to demo the overall quality of FD on the homepage to new visitors.

My experience of FD so far is that my best sellers are items that have good clear keywords so my SEO asumption is partly based on that.

Of course I am planning to put up some over $10 files soon so I am obviously biased…

189 posts
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mbudm says

Hey JStudio – good for you stepping up confessing this ‘heinous’ crime… Here’s a few of my suggestions (alternatives for nice) just mix them up a bit and everyone will be happy(er) ;-)

Cool, audacious, impressive, outstanding, great work, different, original, fantastic file, WoW, good work, congrats, stylish, useful, great idea, scrumptious, terrific, brilliant, spiffing what old chap?

(ok I just read a Stephen Fry book, may explain some of those and the wryness of this post)

189 posts
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mbudm says

I’d kie to be included, currently building in as2 and 3… but i much prefer as3!

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mbudm says

I’m jumping between as3 and as2 at the moment – depending on what i’m making and who it is aimed at. What i find is that now i’m trying to inflict more of the class oop structure on my as2 code which is probably a good thing

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mbudm says

The big issue for me with hourly rates is factoring in the non design/developing time… trying to gauge how well organised the client is and how likely they are to faff around with changes, indecision etc. So often what has started as a discussion about a small job quickly descends into ‘scope creep’.

If i get a very clear spec from someone then I will lower my rate and be much more enthusiastic about the job because it will (overall) take me less time and generally it will mean a more satisfactory experience for me and the client – noone likes a project that drags on.

And I always negotiate and clearly define what ‘completed’ means and a get agreement on a post completion consultantcy rate that is higher than the rate for the job.

This approach turns away a lot of potential clients but it makes me more efficient and frees up my time to work on stock items as well (I realise I only have 5, don’t worry there’s more in the works ;-))

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mbudm says

I favour a solution like that suggested by gdpgiga – a system that uses objective data about the popularity of a file to determine how much exposure the file gets on the homepage.

I can see the benefit from Envato’s perspective of having lots of low selling content, purely for targeting the long tail and increasing SEO based traffic. It would be difficult to analyse whether lower quality files do in fact turn off buyers or if such files are simply ignored.

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mbudm says

Or if it’s a variable of a type that you can only set up when you have certain parameters, like a custom class that needs xml data for example, then put the variable you create within the function into an array or object that you create outside of the function… like so

var myObj:Object = new Object(); function myFunction() { var myVar:someCustomType = new someCustomType(param); myObj.myVar = myVar; }

then you can access myObj.myVar from outside the function too.

Ok so I’m probably complicating matters but this is something that had me tearing my hair out a while back…

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mbudm says

Hi I used to code in as1 a couple of years ago and I have just jumped back in with as3 (my first class is in the upload queue). I’m probably the classic case – a designer who has gradually coded more and more as flash proceeded from timeline actions to OOP . So the last two months has been a process of refreshing my memory, then wondering why as3 works the way it does, before finally getting it.

One of my stumbling blocks was understanding the event model and wondering why things would work, and then suddenly not work. Eventually I realised that most of my problems were because I was relying on events happening in a certain order (duh).

One example of this was my assumption that the ADDED _TO_STAGE event would occur before my XML _ONLOADED event (the xml url is passed as a parameter to the class constructor and immediately loaded within the class). But of course no, it depends on the size of the XML file. Basic stumbling blocks like this have made me really start to understand the idea of encapsulation – it’s keeping things from relying on anything external to themselves right?

Anyway my point is that there are going to be a few teething troubles like this for many of us making the transition to as3 and I encourage anyone with brighter ideas than me to help pull together some general guidelines like not using stage unless you’re sure the instance is in the display list.

Or if there is already a decent guide out there, then link to it.

Cheers

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