Posts by nCrafts

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nCrafts says

Let us not vent our frustrations and disappointments in the Yay! Thread. Let’s use this dedicated Noooo! thread instead.

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nCrafts says

The ranks are not a good way to gauge monthly earnings. You can’t compare a person with a total earnings of $20k over 3 years, with a person hacing earnings of $10k over 5 months.

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nCrafts says



If the end product is accessible for free (if you can navigate the site and use all the functionality without paying just to use it), then a regular license is ok.
The word ‘all’ is very dangerously used here. Do I take it literally? For a e-com site, I need to have purchased at least something to view the backend parts, like order invoice. Would ‘all’ include this as well?

Great point here. Yes, the word “all” is valid, as long as that’s what the end user is paying for. If you have an e-Commerce site, and returning to the boxes example, what the site is selling is the boxes themselves, not the functionality, when a visitor pays, he/she is paying to receive the physical boxes (which the theme/template is not implemented into) and an invoice is part of that end product, so a regular license is ok.

If in the other hand, a visitor pays to access content on the site, lessons (which are not downloaded but embedded in the site), or any other content only available to the paying customers, who are paying to access it, then an extended license is needed. It is always important to think about what the end customer is paying for, and if the marketplace item is implemented in it.

Here is how I understand it:

If I am selling boxes, I don’t need an ext license because the functionality which my paid users get (access to back-end user profile, invoices, etc …) is incidental, or a by-product, of them buying the item itself (which has nothing to do the theme). The box here is separable from the theme.

On the other hand, if I am selling online boxes (say dropbox), the back-end becomes an integral part of the product box. I can’t really sell the box without giving them the back-end as well. In this case I would need an ext license, right?

So, there isn’t really a literal and pixel-perfect demarcation between the licenses. It all depends on the essence of the license.

This certainly clarifies things. The existing documentation about licenses isn’t sufficient. Some examples and clarifications should be made a part of the docs. A lot of content can be taken from this thread.

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nCrafts says

I was 15 when I won $100 off a virtual stock trading game. My first earning :)

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nCrafts says

If the end product is accessible for free (if you can navigate the site and use all the functionality without paying just to use it), then a regular license is ok.

The word ‘all’ is very dangerously used here. Do I take it literally? For a e-com site, I need to have purchased at least something to view the backend parts, like order invoice. Would ‘all’ include this as well?

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nCrafts says


Of course it would also depend on whether the subscription cost money. If it was a subscription without payment, then a regular license would be fine. Otherwise you would need an extended. Thanks!

Lol, you guys are incredible.. So one staff member says that the Regular is ok and the other one says that it’s not?! :D

If even you guys have no idea about the licenses how can you expect users to have any?!

+1

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nCrafts says

Okay, this is embarrassing. I thought a relative of the author of this post had a baby, until I realised that Bill and Kath refers to the royal couple. My mistake. I take back my enthusiasm.

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nCrafts says

Is it just me, or is most of the news about the Royal Baby about people telling other how they dont give a damn about the baby?

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nCrafts says

Pics please!

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nCrafts says

From what I understand, you can use a library licenses under LGPL without having to make the resultant code GPL or LGPL, with the condition that you do not alter the code of the library. So, yes, you can use LGPL stuff to make proprietary stuff.

Please correct me if I am wrong.

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