Posts by rubiqube

78 posts
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rubiqube says

I have a suggestion for the fine folks at Envato, reagarding the photos in the Envato flickr feed: I know changing their licensing might not work, cause then “outsiders” might use it on commercial work, but I was wondering if authors might get a free pass at using them in theme previews for example.

The photos there only seem to get better and better and there are some really good candidates for a genuine agency / business type environment: places, people, closeups, etc. I use some on a local test site for an upcoming theme and they make it look pretty awesome!

More and more designers seem to be joining the “share my quality photos for free” movement and I intend to do the same soon. So… what do guy you think? :)

78 posts
  • Bought between 50 and 99 items
  • Exclusive Author
  • Has been a member for 6-7 years
  • Referred between 100 and 199 users
  • Romania
  • Sold between 50 000 and 100 000 dollars
rubiqube says

Then please post your opinions with this account, not with a clone. It really doesn’t help us getting feedback from users that have no buyer badge yet complain most of the time(I’ve seen a few cases).

How is that relevant? As long as the feedback is provided in a civilized manner, who cares if the user bought any themes? He might be a potential buyer or maybe just someone who would like to share some of his experience working with commercial WordPress themes in general.

Oh… if he’s just posting for posting sake or not providing any useful information, that’s something else. But I didn’t sense that from Markic’s comment.

78 posts
  • Bought between 50 and 99 items
  • Exclusive Author
  • Has been a member for 6-7 years
  • Referred between 100 and 199 users
  • Romania
  • Sold between 50 000 and 100 000 dollars
rubiqube says

The answer is yes, I did this recently: I first launched a plugin on CodeCanyon, then bundled it with my latest theme.


Also; given we now have to create plugins; can I sell those plugins on CodeCanyon separately in addition to including them in my themes?
78 posts
  • Bought between 50 and 99 items
  • Exclusive Author
  • Has been a member for 6-7 years
  • Referred between 100 and 199 users
  • Romania
  • Sold between 50 000 and 100 000 dollars
rubiqube says

Wow, you guys clearly have way too much free time! ;)

78 posts
  • Bought between 50 and 99 items
  • Exclusive Author
  • Has been a member for 6-7 years
  • Referred between 100 and 199 users
  • Romania
  • Sold between 50 000 and 100 000 dollars
rubiqube says

Correction: “Most users think they want an all in one theme”, because it’s what authors taught them to believe. Just like with everything else in our world today, bigger does not mean better, yet we’re brainwashed to believe so.

I totally agree with this statement and it’s no secret I’ve become a big fan of a more modular approach when it comes to theme design and building websites in general. I see no reason to reinvent the wheel when there are so many awesome plugins or third party solutions out there.

A theme’s power shouldn’t be its kick ass sliders (that BTW most users won’t look at beyond slide 1) or the ability to choose between 500 Google fonts. The awesomeness of a theme should come from the author’s ability to create a brand new way to feature content on the homepage or his great choice of typography.

Not to say that we should all create blog skins now. Added functionality is also awesome, but in a plugin. And if you’re thinking you’ll be loosing money or that people will steal your stuff, you clearly didn’t hear about Slider Revolution. Look it up, see how those guys sold a good amount of themes, but nothing groundbreaking, then they identified a need, released a pretty cool plugin to address that need, sold 10k licenses (quite a few of them extended) and made a s**t ton of money.

78 posts
  • Bought between 50 and 99 items
  • Exclusive Author
  • Has been a member for 6-7 years
  • Referred between 100 and 199 users
  • Romania
  • Sold between 50 000 and 100 000 dollars
rubiqube says

Hi everyone, We’ll try to organize this Q & A in a better place such as our knowledgebase, but we’ll continue compiling information for a period of time before we’ll be able to get this fully in place and can use Japh’s initial solution as a sort of drafting grounds. :-)

Awesome!

78 posts
  • Bought between 50 and 99 items
  • Exclusive Author
  • Has been a member for 6-7 years
  • Referred between 100 and 199 users
  • Romania
  • Sold between 50 000 and 100 000 dollars
rubiqube says

Once again, I have to say these changes are a very good idea and it’s great Envato is keeping an eye on author feedback, so that the transition is smooth and… mostly painless. :) As this thread will grow and probably even surpass the other one in length, it might be a good idea to pick up some of the more interesting or recurring questions and create some sort of FAQ that’s more easily accessible.

On the topic of moving custom post / metabox type functionality to a plugin, here’s a quick experience I had:

I started working on a restaurant WordPress theme before there was any news of new requirements, but I’ve been reading what some more experienced plugin and theme developers had to say and I decided to move the menu functionality to a plugin. Long story short… the theme isn’t very popular for now, but the plugin was posted on CodeCanyon and started to get some attention. This led to a bit of extra income and now I can also easily reuse that work in case I decide to give it another try release another restaurant theme.

Sure, many authors will argue that if you have a solid framework, you can achieve a similar workflow (and I tend to agree), but I personally prefer a more modular approach. So I will probably create more plugins for menu, team members, reviews, products, testimonials, etc. and then plug them into a new theme, depending on the focus of that theme.

78 posts
  • Bought between 50 and 99 items
  • Exclusive Author
  • Has been a member for 6-7 years
  • Referred between 100 and 199 users
  • Romania
  • Sold between 50 000 and 100 000 dollars
rubiqube says

Just wanted to reiterate that my “leverage default WordPress features” did not mean “create pretty blog skins”. :)

78 posts
  • Bought between 50 and 99 items
  • Exclusive Author
  • Has been a member for 6-7 years
  • Referred between 100 and 199 users
  • Romania
  • Sold between 50 000 and 100 000 dollars
rubiqube says

@FinalDestiny No need to be snarky about it, we’re all here to debate this and we’re each entitled to an opinion. I didn’t say WP is meant to be used as a blogging system, did I? All I meant was that WP can be powerful using Post, Pages and custom post types as part of a plugin. Throw in the Theme Customizer and maybe a solid options plugin and you got yourself a pretty solid CMS.

Are a gazilion shortcodes necessary for one to build a good website? I think not. Like I said, most people will use what you give them, weather you agree with me or not. My phrasing was indeed a bit off the first time. What I meant was buyers know indeed what they want, but it doesn’t necessarily mean they need it.

@jayc Totally! And for me the answer is sometimes “It’s not, but that’s a good idea and the theme could benefit from that functionality, so I will update” or “Sorry, the theme isn’t built with that in mind, so you should look elsewhere”. Of course it’s always harder to say no, but on the other hand with the first one there’s the risk of feature creep.

@themique Ok, maybe that was a bit over dramatic from my part. Multipurpose themes are not going away very soon, I just think niche themes are a better option. There are many reasons for my way of thinking, but they would go a bit outside the scope of this discussion.

I always thought stock themes (what I mean here is themes that are not custom designed and built for a particular client) should have enough appeal for people with less knowledge of WP inner workings, but still be simple enough in code for a designer / developer to pick up and take to the next level.

As for WP loyalty… I’ve been using it for custom client work since 2008 I think, but if you’re thinking my comment was about “being true to the platform” and all that jazz… trust me, I’m not that guy! WP is way beyond blogging platform status, is just that good websites can still be built without necessarily reinventing the wheel. I’ve said this before, but I can’t stress it enough.

And with that I think I’m done for now. ;)

78 posts
  • Bought between 50 and 99 items
  • Exclusive Author
  • Has been a member for 6-7 years
  • Referred between 100 and 199 users
  • Romania
  • Sold between 50 000 and 100 000 dollars
rubiqube says


When it comes to new releases, I think authors should understand that the days of “all in one” themes are over and that from now on they should ditch the composers and builders and focus on creating more nicely designed niche themes that use little options and the leverage default WordPress features. It’s what I intend to do from now on.

Don’t do that! You can still be creative with your themes ;)

Absolutely! But I intend to try and be more creative design and layout wise. Of course a theme needs features and options too, but when it comes to admin stuff I always thought it’s best to not move too far from what WP has to offer and instead try to leverage that. Not to say that a solid theme framework and compose are a bad thing, they’re just not my thing. :)

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