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lollum says

Ok, thanks.

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kriskorn says


Envato should release a HUGE plugin with all the bells and whistles for the authors to create their themes on… (Admin Panels, Page Builders, Shortcodes, CPTs etc.), otherwise this will be a chaos, if there isn’t a central plugin to build upon.

That would be a step backwards in my opinion.

I don’t want to be restricted to other authors work, I want to create my own stuff that I can later build upon and improve based on customer feedback, if we are all going to use the same backend ui with the same features etc, we might as well all give up on our jobs, where is the innovation that keeps things interesting?

I totally agree with you. But it would be a better solution than encouraging authors to use massive amounts of heavily modified plugins. As someone said: “We are not creating wp.org blog skins here…”

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pixedelic says

Maybe a personal question, but if, instead to use the shortcodes, I used html comments, so, if someone switched to another theme he wouldn’t see any “dead” shortcode, but only text? Is that allowed.

For instance, I could replace the html comments by adding a filter to the_content(), so a column of my page builder would be:

<!-- start column -->
Text text text
<!-- end column -->

I mean, if my shortcodes don’t have any effect on the output of a different theme, are they allowed? If by deactivating the theme the tabs become links only, the columns become full width text and everything is hidden as html comment (easily removable with a SQL command) is that allowed?

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Siddharth Reviewer says


Can someone from the TF staff please answer my question? Are page builders allowed? Yes or not?
Sorry! I have asked Siddharth to respond to this particular question, so I imagine he’ll reply soon.

Regarding page builders, we don’t have anything concrete. I’ll talk to a few more people and post back soon.

Additionally, the grace period in the original post has now been extended by another five weeks to a full eight weeks.

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onioneye says

Exactly my thoughts as well. Although I fortunately don’t have a lot of items in my portfolio, there is still A LOT of work to be done, if I want them to comply with all those mentioned requirements.

I am fully aware that the usage of TimThumb, and a few shortcodes here and there, for example, isn’t in the spirit of best WP practices nowadays, but they still work perfectly fine for most of my clients, who primarily use my themes to build small portfolio sites, and don’t have any major problems, if they decide to switch themes eventually.

I guess I could go back and spend some serious time on making everything compliant with these new rules, but what is the incentive for me to do so? Just to be able to keep the existing items in my portfolio? Imagine all those items that don’t sell in large/acceptable quantities anymore; what would the motivations behind updating those be? Don’t get me wrong though; I am all up for standards and improving this marketplace, but you need to give the authors some incentive to spend time on updating their items; otherwise I feel they will just give up on a lot of them because for most authors it doesn’t pay of both financially and timewise to do so, when they can perhaps work on new things, that will potentially bring in more money for them. In a perfect world, just making your items better for your clients should be the reward itself, but we unfortunately don’t live in a world like that. Everybody needs to make a buck, and I imagine that for many, if not all of the authors that would be one of their most primary concerns in this line of work, or any other for that matter.

By the way, a bit off topic, and maybe even not that relevant for most of the people, but I feel the same way about the reward system you established for authors out here. It used to be exciting to work eagerly and chase that next badge because getting it filled you up with a great sense of accomplishment and pride. However, after obtaining the green paw, everything seemed to quiet down, and the next “step” looked almost like mission impossible. There is a lot of gap left in between those, so I think you need to work on that, IMHO. I mean, don’t you want your most successful authors to be driven even more to put out great work on the marketplaces, so they can earn you more money, Envato? Wouldn’t that be a win-win situation?


I fully understand and support using these guidelines (with a few exceptions that are already being discussed) for future submissions, but should themes already available on TF really be subjected to these guidelines? Essentially, the longer you’ve been earning money on Envato, the more work you have to do now if you wish to hold on to that income. If you have a dozen, two dozen, three dozen themes up on TF, you’ll be facing busy times indeed. It’s like a retroactive law; you’re kind of being punished for something that was completely permissible at the time you did it…
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bitfade says
Functionality will need to be added via bespoke plugins instead of via shortcodes as much as possible.

this isn’t clear to me. Do you mean shortcodes should be avoided in general or just moved into a plugin ?

Also, what about custom post types / custom metaboxes ?

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BonfireThemes says


Maintenance is a part of selling themes. Over time, they need to be updated. Themes that were accepted when standards were low affect the reputation of the marketplace as a whole if they aren’t brought up to meet the standards.

A very good point, did not see it that way at first ;)

Luke

Yup, I can agree with that as well. I guess it wouldn’t be as alarming if authors had a more precise road map which to act by. For example, everyone has until Jan 2014 to update their already-released themes, after which there will be a mass review of all themes and Envato will start contacting authors individually to ask to update their themes in 30 days or face removal from the marketplace.

I think the most accurate timetable we’ve seen until now is “months”; will there be an official timeline released that authors can follow?

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Siddharth Reviewer says

I guess it wouldn’t be as alarming if authors had a more precise road map which to act by. For example, everyone has until Jan 2014 to update their already-released themes, after which there will be a mass review of all themes and Envato will start contacting authors individually to ask to update their themes in 30 days or face removal from the marketplace. I think the most accurate timetable we’ve seen until now is “months”; will there be an official timeline released that authors can follow?
I completely agree. We should have been more transparent about the expected timeline. We assumed giving out concrete timelines for the initial phase would suffice.

I’ll discuss our long term strategy with the team and update here.

Thanks for your feedback, everyone. It’s been very, very useful.
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UXbarn says

I think moving shortcodes to individual plugin isn’t the appropriate solution. It sounds strange and I think it’s not the purpose of the “plugin” in the first place. A plugin should be created and available to be massively used by users to serve some specific requirements, and it should be optional.

If the authors create their own plugins just for their shortcodes only, do you still see that is normal? What’s the point here? Are all shortcodes really needed to be in the plugin? Why?

If the answer to those questions is to make it more standard and to be complied with wp.org’s best practices, then you should build up the standard plugin for all of us, only one plugin for us to use for the same purposes. That plugin should include all possible shortcodes. It should be flexible and scalable enough for us to build our custom works on top, and the most important is, it shouldn’t limit our creativity.

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Bluxart says

I think moving shortcodes to individual plugin isn’t the appropriate solution. It sounds strange and I think it’s not the purpose of the “plugin” in the first place. A plugin should be created and available to be massively used by users to serve some specific requirements, and it should be optional.

If the authors create their own plugins just for their shortcodes only, do you still see that is normal? What’s the point here? Are all shortcodes really needed to be in the plugin? Why?

If the answer to those questions is to make it more standard and to be complied with wp.org’s best practices, then you should build up the standard plugin for all of us, only one plugin for us to use for the same purposes. That plugin should include all possible shortcodes. It should be flexible and scalable enough for us to build our custom works on top, and the most important is, it shouldn’t limit our creativity.

+1

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