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FinalDestiny says



The mentality that “Standards” mean you can’t be creative is so horribly wrong. By embracing standards, theme and plugin developers can build things that work in tandem instead of constantly fighting conflicts.
But if all theme’s functionality need to rely on the plugins, I’m wondering how can theme authors push their ideas and creativity to the edge?

Just because major functionality needs to be in a plugin doesn’t mean you can’t create your own plugins.

For example, if your theme is based around major portfolio features (filtering, categorization, grids, galleries, etc), build a portfolio plugin that is built specifically with the features you want, then style / implement the features provided by the plugin in your theme.

Just because the code exists in a plugin doesn’t mean you can’t be creative. The code is the same no matter where it exists.

Also by placing your major features in a plugin, you can really easily include those features in all of the themes you build. Update the plugin once and all of your themes have the update. So much easier to maintain.

Then you won’t be a theme developer, but a theme customizer. Having a bunch of plugins, modifying some things for the layout and voila, new theme. Having the same portfolio features and look for the same themes is highly unprobable, each theme has its own features and functions.

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jonathan01 says

Also by placing your major features in a plugin, you can really easily include those features in all of the themes you build. Update the plugin once and all of your themes have the update. So much easier to maintain.

This statement right here should at least strike something in the heads of those theme developers here that don’t think they should be using plugins. If nothing else, think of the amount of hours you will save using (even your own) plugins when developing your themes.

As @mordauk already said, some features will need to have exceptions and this I’m sure is understood by everyone, Envato included and we will all work things out in the end.

Jonathan

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organicbee says

Also one note about the W3c validation, what about prefixes or things that are included with the current spec but support across major browsers? W3c should be used a guide but almost no modern site really validate because of prefixing

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UXbarn says



The mentality that “Standards” mean you can’t be creative is so horribly wrong. By embracing standards, theme and plugin developers can build things that work in tandem instead of constantly fighting conflicts.
But if all theme’s functionality need to rely on the plugins, I’m wondering how can theme authors push their ideas and creativity to the edge?

Just because major functionality needs to be in a plugin doesn’t mean you can’t create your own plugins.

For example, if your theme is based around major portfolio features (filtering, categorization, grids, galleries, etc), build a portfolio plugin that is built specifically with the features you want, then style / implement the features provided by the plugin in your theme.

Just because the code exists in a plugin doesn’t mean you can’t be creative. The code is the same no matter where it exists.

Also by placing your major features in a plugin, you can really easily include those features in all of the themes you build. Update the plugin once and all of your themes have the update. So much easier to maintain.

Thanks for your clarification. :)

Anyway, I still have some concern because by doing that, most authors will release their own plugins for their own creativity right? Wouldn’t it be a problem or strange when there are 1000 plugins by 1000 authors? Also I don’t think many authors will use other authors’ plugins to create such functionality because what they need is uniqueness (I’m not talking about generic elements like contact form or button but the unique functionality of the theme). What is your opinion on this?

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jonathan01 says

Also one note about the W3c validation, what about prefixes or things that are included with the current spec but support across major browsers? W3c should be used a guide but almost no modern site really validate because of prefixing

This is 100% correct imo. Show me a modern, good looking usable website that is fully validated. I really don’t know of any. Best to make sure that there’s no huge mistakes and if the theme works on all browsers it states without any errors then that’s proper validation.

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organicbee says

Also “The text domain parameter must be a string and not a variable or constant.” this is semi silly, there some cases where classes use a constant(filtered) to define the parameter so it can be reused. also there are a few theme frameworks that use a constant.

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OriginalEXE says


Also by placing your major features in a plugin, you can really easily include those features in all of the themes you build. Update the plugin once and all of your themes have the update. So much easier to maintain.

This statement right here should at least strike something in the heads of those theme developers here that don’t think they should be using plugins. If nothing else, think of the amount of hours you will save using (even your own) plugins when developing your themes.

Jonathan
I achieve the same thing with theme framework, only now I have to bundle it in a plugin instead.
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nhangen says

The nice thing about using your own plugins is that you can maintain extensibility and update the theme/plugins separately. As a plugin developer, I supposed I’m biased, but I prefer to keep my code segmented.

However, on the other side, having purchased many TF themes for low-budget (and sometimes high-budget) clients, the new submission requirements make things a little more difficult for agencies that need an all-in-one solution.

For example, often times, you can buy a TF theme, customize it, and then hand it over to the client. You’ve trained them how to use the settings (that exist in one place) and use shortcodes. Usually, they barely comprehend this stuff, but after a bit of training, you can hand over the site and they can keep it going. They’ll probably never update the theme…ever.

With the new requirements, you’ll have to train them on additional plugin menus, on top of theme menus. Might need to show them how to keep things updated. Have to make sure they don’t accidentally uninstall a required plugin and wonder why their site is broken. Have to hope they don’t click the automatic update button that breaks something and then they call you to have you fix it for free, etc.

In some cases, you have to convince them to spend more money for a premium plugin, rather than use the one in the theme.

I realize this isn’t the only use case, but it’s a common one, so it will be interesting to see how it plays out.

I do agree that many TF themes are bloated and buggy as heck, and customizing them has become more and more difficult. I hope that in the long-run, Envato and TF themers can come to a fair compromise.

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organicbee says

can we also add a SSL check for all external scripts/styles loaded, Ive had some cases where assets fail because of SSL.

function prefix_styles(){
//Check if is ssl
$schema = is_ssl() ? 'https://' : 'http://'; 
wp_register_style( 'cw-font', $schema . 'fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Noto+Sans:400,700,400italic' , array(), 1.0 , false  );    
}

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mordauk says

There are 25,000+ plugins in the WP.org repo. Will 1000 new plugins be an issue? Definitely not.

Just because 5 themes use the same plugin for the base of their functionality doesn’t mean the themes all have to be identical.

Take WooCommerce themes for example. Each and every one of them uses the same functionality base for creating an ecommerce website, but they can still each be unique by tweaking the behavior of WooCommerce, by utilizing some features and not others, etc.

If you think themes that use the same plugin as the base of their functionality all have to be identical, I’d question whether you even understand how functionality works, whether in a plugin or in a theme.

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