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_sonuJ says

Is it going to be like what components/modules do in Joomla? The theme will just have the visual appearances for the Wordpress while the additional features such as shortcodes, page templates, post templates, woo-commerce related tweaks will be the part of respective plugins?

Seems like a good idea for advanced customer’s point of view. They can easily switch the themes while retaining the current functionality of an existing theme. But on major side it seems like horrible idea of beginners and developers as well. There are customers who still use some auto-install scripts provided by host to setup Wordpress. And from the developers point of view, How will they provide after-sales support in such cases?

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StyledThemes says

I wish the limiting of unruly options pages were mentioned in the new theme requirements. I’d love to see developers pushed to using (and extending) the built-in WordPress Customizer. Maybe some day…

I haven’t submitted WP themes to Themeforest yet, but I can easily say I’ve been following WP standards for quite awhile now, and one thing I have incorporated since last year is the theme customizer…in fact I was one of the first in the WP themes repository to use this.

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bringthepixel says

I don’t understand why “Tabs must be used for indentation—not spaces’’ is a better guideline than let’s say “Responsive design is a must have”. And guess what, everybody makes responsive themes without guidelines :)

regards, Michael

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StyledThemes says

For a while now we have been working towards updating our theme standards on ThemeForest. The goal is to have a consistent, public standard so every customer has a seamless experience using our products.

As a WordPress theme developer (Have not submitted any to TF yet), there’s a few things that need clarifying, although I am not sure if any of the following items have been addressed yet due to the fact I do not have the time to read through 57+ pages on this thread :)

First, I will be honest in saying it’s great to see WordPress standards coming in to TF, because they are desperately needed and will simply make themes that much better. I should also mention that I also have themes in the WordPress.org repository and quite familiar with standards and their review process, which brings me to this…

When submitting a theme to the WordPress.org list, you go through extensive reviewing, and they do a very thorough job of it with the experience and skills their team has. This is also one of the reasons it takes an average of 5 weeks to get your theme reviewed because they literally go through your code with a precision. I can definitely say that if any theme on TF was submitted to their review team, no theme would be approved even though many look amazing in design, but a theme is not just about visual effects, it’s also about quality of code…which in my opinion is the foundation of any theme and should be just as important as good looks.

Now with that being said, my question is, what is the experience level of your reviewers for WordPress standards, and will authors be expecting a lot longer review times when submitting themes? Right now it appears themes were getting decided on in as little as 20 minutes after submitting, but with the new standards in place, I’m expecting this will no longer be the case?

Also, here’s a few items relating to your list of requirements:

  • Modification of the wpautop filter is not allowed: There are times your theme needs to remove filters for something specific, i.e. the gallery should one want to customize the gallery with more control
  • Refrain from using over-qualified selectors, div.container can simply be stated as .container.: Sometimes you have to do this because a class without a selector can be ignored until you add a selector. I agree it should not be excessively used, but with limited use only when absolutely needed.
  • JavaScript files need to be placed at the bottom, barring critical exclusion: This is true and false. There are times when some scripts MUST be in the <head> area.
  • No inline styles are allowed any where: True for the most part but in cases like my themes, I use the theme customizer which customizes page elements with specific styling that is determined by the user when choosing options, rather than fill up the <head> with a ton of styles, i.e.: colours. This one is accepted by the review team at WordPress.org

Overall, as I said, bringing in standards from WordPress is a good move and for the end-user that buys themes from here, they will be far better off. Especially when the biggest problem are themes that look awesome, but are bloated with built-in plugins (a big no no) and built-in shortcodes from hell (another big no no), all of which causes a lot of problems for the customer should they change themes.

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StyledThemes says

These changes overall do make a better product but for existing themes FOR any author / buyer will just be a huge headache.

This is very true….The way Envato should go about this is to apply the new requirements to new submissions and not existing themes. I can only imagine how many chargebacks they would (will) get from very upset customers if authors have to go back to all of their previously approved themes to do excessive changes which would in my opinion, take a couple years for some.

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georgestephanis says

I don’t understand why “Tabs must be used for indentation—not spaces’’ is a better guideline than let’s say “Responsive design is a must have”. And guess what, everybody makes responsive themes without guidelines :) regards, Michael

Firstly, it’s standard practice for WordPress to use tabs over spaces.

http://make.wordpress.org/core/handbook/php/

Secondly, it results in smaller file sizes. One character, instead of four.

Third, consistency. One isn’t strictly better than the other (tabs v spaces)—the point is to be consistent, and TF just happened to request consistency in keeping with WordPress standards and practices.

None of the more stringent code formatting rules—just use tabs instead of spaces. It probably makes reviewer’s lives easier.

If it irritates you, indent each level four tabs instead of four spaces. That’ll teach ‘em!

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AtiX says

Hi,

I found that these are “Inadmissible shortcodes”: maps, accordions and toggles, boxed contents, column, contact forms, charts.

Please, explain why and how users will create columns, accordions and toggles, if they have no idea about html/css? Thank you.

Best regards, AtiX

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BonfireThemes says

I’ll add another symbolic “+1” to the voices who are rebelling against banning any and all inline css. What can be done through dedicated css files, should. But I don’t know of another way than inline css to make use of WordPress’s own theme customizer as far as setting custom colors go.

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WebLionMedia says

I also agree with this one “There are times when some scripts MUST be in the <head> area.”

For example these jquery scripts can be placed only in the header: jquery.tools.min.js, jquery-ui.custom.min.js’ and others… If we will place them in the footer, then will not work.

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StyledThemes says

...Please, explain why and how users will create columns, accordions and toggles, if they have no idea about html/css? ....

I don’t know about others, but the direction I am looking into is to design mine in a way that they contain inline styles but used as html snippets the user simply copies and pastes into their post or page. There’s another method I am looking into where themes include a special stylesheet only for “in page” elements that the user can copy and paste the css into their new theme’s stylesheet (or link to it). All with simple tutorial to show how.

I personally do not like shortcodes because in theory they are great, but in the real world, especially for large websites, they are notoriously messy to clean up when someone does change themes. Plugins are not perfect either, especially if one wants to change the layout or styling of select elements so it works with their new theme style, should they be using a shortcode plugin. Try explaining how to edit that to to someone who has no html, css, or even WordPress skills.

In a perfect world, people would use your theme forever :) But, I’ve come across some people who change up at least twice and even more within a year.

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