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FinalDestiny says

When it comes to new releases, I think authors should understand that the days of “all in one” themes are over and that from now on they should ditch the composers and builders and focus on creating more nicely designed niche themes that use little options and the leverage default WordPress features. It’s what I intend to do from now on.

If you’re thinking “buyers won’t like this and that” or “buyers want this and that in their themes”, remember that in most cases (and I don’t mean to offend anyone here) buyers don’t know what they want, so you should give them what they need, not what they want.

Just in case you didn’t know, WordPress is a CMS. A CMS, content management system, not a blogging system. The default WordPress features are simply a blog system. That’s all. As far as I know, WordPress is NOT advertised as a blogging system, but as a CMS.

And about the customers, oh, they surely know what they want. And even when we have like options for almost everything, I receive tens of requests “How do I do that? Why can’t I do that? How do I change this and make it like that?”, even if those questions are totally out of the support scope. So please don’t come and say clients will buy whatever crap you will sell them, I think my clients are smart enough to know what they want.

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jayc says


When it comes to new releases…..
I receive tens of requests “How do I do that? Why can’t I do that? How do I change this and make it like that?”, even if those questions are totally out of the support scope…....

No :), the most frequent question with themes is “Is it possible….”, God! I can’t hear this question anymore, both buyer and author know that is possible with some custom work.

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themique says

When it comes to new releases, I think authors should understand that the days of “all in one” themes are over and that from now on they should ditch the composers and builders and focus on creating more nicely designed niche themes that use little options and the leverage default WordPress features. It’s what I intend to do from now on.

If you’re thinking “buyers won’t like this and that” or “buyers want this and that in their themes”, remember that in most cases (and I don’t mean to offend anyone here) buyers don’t know what they want, so you should give them what they need, not what they want.

With all due respect, I completely disagree with you.

If you look at the popular page, you can see what buyers are looking for and you should find out that these days are absolutely days of “All in One” themes.

I think we should clarify what is our strategy in doing business in Themeforest.

If we are looking to use wordpress as a great tool for customers to let them create their online business with it, Then we should go with making great themes with powerful backends.

But if we are here to prove our loyalty to WordPress, then it’s ok to go with simple (of course beautiful) blog only themes.

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adiacone says


When it comes to new releases, I think authors should understand that the days of “all in one” themes are over and that from now on they should ditch the composers and builders and focus on creating more nicely designed niche themes that use little options and the leverage default WordPress features. It’s what I intend to do from now on.

Don’t do that! You can still be creative with your themes ;)

Absolutely! But I intend to try and be more creative design and layout wise. Of course a theme needs features and options too, but when it comes to admin stuff I always thought it’s best to not move too far from what WP has to offer and instead try to leverage that. Not to say that a solid theme framework and compose are a bad thing, they’re just not my thing. :)

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BonfireThemes says

I’ll add another symbolic “+1” to the voices who are rebelling against banning any and all inline css. What can be done through dedicated css files, should. But I don’t know of another way than inline css to make use of WordPress’s own theme customizer as far as setting custom colors go.

I have to correct myself. By inline, I was really thinking of embedded, as in placing classes between <style></style> tags in the header. My bad.

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Cubell says

There have been a lot of good points made throughout this thread, but guys, maybe it’s best we stop adding pages to this thread so that the Envato staff can actually read through all of it and reply sooner.

Let’s wait for them to talk before we add another 60 pages :)

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adiacone says

@FinalDestiny No need to be snarky about it, we’re all here to debate this and we’re each entitled to an opinion. I didn’t say WP is meant to be used as a blogging system, did I? All I meant was that WP can be powerful using Post, Pages and custom post types as part of a plugin. Throw in the Theme Customizer and maybe a solid options plugin and you got yourself a pretty solid CMS.

Are a gazilion shortcodes necessary for one to build a good website? I think not. Like I said, most people will use what you give them, weather you agree with me or not. My phrasing was indeed a bit off the first time. What I meant was buyers know indeed what they want, but it doesn’t necessarily mean they need it.

@jayc Totally! And for me the answer is sometimes “It’s not, but that’s a good idea and the theme could benefit from that functionality, so I will update” or “Sorry, the theme isn’t built with that in mind, so you should look elsewhere”. Of course it’s always harder to say no, but on the other hand with the first one there’s the risk of feature creep.

@themique Ok, maybe that was a bit over dramatic from my part. Multipurpose themes are not going away very soon, I just think niche themes are a better option. There are many reasons for my way of thinking, but they would go a bit outside the scope of this discussion.

I always thought stock themes (what I mean here is themes that are not custom designed and built for a particular client) should have enough appeal for people with less knowledge of WP inner workings, but still be simple enough in code for a designer / developer to pick up and take to the next level.

As for WP loyalty… I’ve been using it for custom client work since 2008 I think, but if you’re thinking my comment was about “being true to the platform” and all that jazz… trust me, I’m not that guy! WP is way beyond blogging platform status, is just that good websites can still be built without necessarily reinventing the wheel. I’ve said this before, but I can’t stress it enough.

And with that I think I’m done for now. ;)

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Jaynesh says


When it comes to new releases, I think authors should understand that the days of “all in one” themes are over and that from now on they should ditch the composers and builders and focus on creating more nicely designed niche themes that use little options and the leverage default WordPress features. It’s what I intend to do from now on.

If you’re thinking “buyers won’t like this and that” or “buyers want this and that in their themes”, remember that in most cases (and I don’t mean to offend anyone here) buyers don’t know what they want, so you should give them what they need, not what they want.

Just in case you didn’t know, WordPress is a CMS. A CMS, content management system, not a blogging system. The default WordPress features are simply a blog system. That’s all. As far as I know, WordPress is NOT advertised as a blogging system, but as a CMS.

And about the customers, oh, they surely know what they want. And even when we have like options for almost everything, I receive tens of requests “How do I do that? Why can’t I do that? How do I change this and make it like that?”, even if those questions are totally out of the support scope. So please don’t come and say clients will buy whatever crap you will sell them, I think my clients are smart enough to know what they want.

I agree with this. This can be proven just by looking at the weekly top sellers. Buyers aren’t looking for blogging skins.

I think this whole situation can easily be solved by adding a category for authors to submit WordPress skins.

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adiacone says

Just wanted to reiterate that my “leverage default WordPress features” did not mean “create pretty blog skins”. :)

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BonfireThemes says

Another thing to point out is the required use of “get_post_thumbnail”..

What if a theme only needs to echo the thumbnail url, and not the complete <img src="url" />? If something like this is used to get the url only: <?php $image_id = get_post_thumbnail_id(); $image_url = wp_get_attachment_image_src($image_id,'large', true); echo $image_url[0]; ?>

.. then Theme Check will say “get_post_thumbnail” is not used… Unless someone knows a better way to do the above, this should probably be under the exceptions as well.

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