280 posts
  • Has referred 10+ members
  • Has sold $40,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 10+ items on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
+1 more
PrimaThemes says

@Doru and @icypixels

But we are not talking about hardcoding anything. Let’s say I want to be able to add some custom BG color to my page’s title. I mean page as a post type. And I want to do it separately for each page (each page can have a different color for its title). Sure it can be done with this wp_add_inline_style function somehow, but it is MUCH easier to add it as a inline CSS. What’s wrong with it? User have a full controll over this, it is not like I am hardcoding something to the title and he must edit the code to change it, he can change it easily in his page’s options and of course he doesn’t even have to use it.

It is not wrong… But, for your case, I prefer to use wp_add_inline_style action or create a custom function to put it on wp_head action. It is more WordPress “standard”... ;)

As long as you put your css code before </head>, I think it is safe for review process…

2002 posts
  • Has referred 50+ members
  • Has sold $500,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 10+ items on Envato Market
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
+9 more
bitfade says

About inline styles, 20-13 theme:

<div id="headimg" style="background: url(<?php header_image(); ?>) no-repeat scroll top; background-size: 1600px auto;" />

question: what about all the themes that include custom layout builders ? you would try to enforce some kind of restriction there too ?

1789 posts Don't Worry, Be Happy
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
  • Made it to the Authors' Hall of Fame
+8 more
FinalDestiny says

So, let’s see, if we have some theme-specific features like cool services section or filterable portfolio, how are we supposed to integrate it? Through shortcodes, obviously, but creating plugins for each theme individually is just stupid. Now we don’t have to maintenance 10 themes, but 10 themes + 30 plugins maybe? Really?

And how about the grid? Why aren’t we allowed to create column shortcodes? One may use skelton, one bootstrap, one their own grid, how do we integrate it within the theme without shortcodes?

543 posts
  • Has referred 10+ members
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 10+ items on Envato Market
  • Located in Slovakia
+3 more
LubosVolovar says
@PrimaThemes

As I said, I agree that it can be done with wp_add_inline_css, but my problem is that my theme allows user to choose if they want to use skin css for they colors, or they want to use custom colors generated with Cutomize API. So I can’t rely on static handler when enqueuing the CSS with wp_add_inline_css for page’s title as this CSS must be loaded as a last CSS definition, otherwise there will be CSS conflicts. So in my case, using the wp_add_inline_css for page’s title color is much more complicated.

543 posts
  • Has referred 10+ members
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 10+ items on Envato Market
  • Located in Slovakia
+3 more
LubosVolovar says

So, let’s see, if we have some theme-specific features like cool services section or filterable portfolio, how are we supposed to integrate it? Through shortcodes, obviously, but creating plugins for each theme individually is just stupid. Now we don’t have to maintenance 10 themes, but 10 themes + 30 plugins maybe? Really? And how about the grid? Why aren’t we allowed to create column shortcodes? One may use skelton, one bootstrap, one their own grid, how do we integrate it within the theme without shortcodes?

I am with you. If my plugin with shortcodes can’t be 100% compatible with other themes, what’s the point of creating it. And making it to be 100% compatible with other themes is total nonsens.

This will only confuses less skilled user when they switch to another theme.

138 posts
  • Has referred 10+ members
  • Has sold $75,000+ on Envato Market and is now an Elite Author
  • Has collected 50+ items on Envato Market
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
+2 more
M-Theme says

Maybe the new Submission Requirements has limited us. I think the shortcode functions should be the part of the theme, the shortcode manager should be a plugin.

954 posts
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Has sold $1,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has been a beta tester for an Envato feature
  • Won a Most Wanted contest
+3 more
aleluja says

creating plugins for each theme individually is just stupid.

No it isn’t. Imagine its 2016 and you have a blog since 2011 with lots of followers and a big audience and you bought the theme from here and the design is already outdated so you decide to switch a theme. You switch it and all 1000s of posts are full with non-handled shortcodes.

1789 posts Don't Worry, Be Happy
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
  • Made it to the Authors' Hall of Fame
+8 more
FinalDestiny says

The point here is that the user should keep the same layout and functions even after they switch themes. But that’s simply not possible.

First, we’re not creating simple blog themes like wordpress.org to apply all their standards and keep the functionality out. Of course, when you have just blog posts and that’s all, it’s extremely easy to apply all those standards, but those themes are just not for ThemeForest.

And, how do you think the elements will look like on a completely new theme? It will look ok? Surely NOT. Because each theme has its styling and its individual layout, if it breaks up, who will support him? The theme author? Of course not, because he doesn’t have anything to do with the plugin. The ThemeForest author? Not a chance, why would he provide support for someone that uses another theme?

I can’t agree with this, not when we create complex themes.

1789 posts Don't Worry, Be Happy
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
  • Made it to the Authors' Hall of Fame
+8 more
FinalDestiny says


creating plugins for each theme individually is just stupid.
No it isn’t. Imagine its 2016 and you have a blog since 2011 with lots of followers and a big audience and you bought the theme from here and the design is already outdated so you decide to switch a theme. You switch it and all 1000s of posts are full with non-handled shortcodes.

And switching the theme to another and breaking the whole design because the new theme handles the lists / tables or the other elements in a different way… is a better option? For themes that use just plain posts and no custom post types, page templates, etc

389 posts
  • Has referred 100+ members
  • Has sold $250,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 10+ items on Envato Market
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
+5 more
EugeneO says

Moving towards a plugin centric is a good idea however for it to work I think we will also need some standardized plugins for the common theme features. Otherwise, we are going to end up with 1000 different shortcode plugins, 1000 different portfolio plugins, etc which is going to make things just as complicated. I know this was something that was suggested a while back but I don’t know how far the idea progressed.

by
by
by
by
by
by