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ChapterThemes says

It’s 100% possible to standardize a base set of shortcodes into a standard ThemeForest plugin with standard base styles specifically for theme authors all to use so that there aren’t 100 different implementations of the same thing.

That’s not the point. Point is it has no place on a marketplace. I ( and surely many others ) want to create our own. Why? Cuzz authors want to compete. And authors want to put in their own options like they feel it’s best.


If it also possible to then use CSS for the theme to customize the look of the shortcode output by overriding and applying additional styles to the standardized output.

Now the good part.

It’s also possible through the magic of these things called hooks and filters to make shortcodes that would support a theme adding additional options.

Wow jeezzz, really? What a wonderful thing!

don’t automatically count someone as one of those ‘hacking’ authors you talk about, cuzz you surely implying so.


Too many people hacking together themes that look beautiful and shiny on the outside but are a muddled, copy-n-pasted, and completed wrecked under the hood because they really don’t know what they are doing. Most of you are front end developers. You don’t know what’s going on under the hood and it shows. Believe me, it shows. This is why ThemeForest is implementing these guidelines. You guys put yourself in this position.

Floating on air or something? “You guys”, pff cmon…

Bottom line:

This is a market place. Authors want to sell, authors want to be different from the rest. And yes, it’s a good thing that we moving more towards the good practices and uses as WordPress.org intended, but this is still a market place: no place for happy opensource wordpress plugin packages for all to share so we all get themes with all the same shortcode happiness.

edit: besides, most authors already share enough – which is a good thing at the level it’s going on now..

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carlhancock says

Bottom line:

This is a market place. Authors want to sell, authors want to be different from the rest. And yes, it’s a good thing that we moving more towards the good practices and uses as WordPress.org intended, but this is still a market place: no place for happy opensource wordpress plugin packages for all to share so we all get themes with all the same shortcode happiness.

edit: besides, most authors already share enough – which is a good thing at the level it’s going on now..

This has nothing to do with WordPress.org. This has to do with the great WordPress community, including the commercial market as a whole.

If you don’t know who I am, I am one of the co-founders of Gravity Forms. One of the most successful commercial WordPress plugins on the market. 99% of our support issues related to theme conflicts we encounter are caused by poorly developed ThemeForest themes. 99%. This is a fact.

I can tell you with 99% accuracy when one of our support team encounters a conflict caused by a poorly developed theme that the theme is from ThemeForest. Sadly i’m not exaggerating at all.

What ThemeForest authors that don’t know what they are doing don’t realize is how their work impacts others. Our company has wasted more money in support time dealing with issues caused by poorly developed ThemeForest themes than you’ve made in your entire time selling WordPress themes.

All this could be avoided by simply following best practices… guidelines being implemented by Envato now.

I don’t give a damn if this makes Theme Authors get in the good graces with WordPress.org or the open source communithy, what I give a damn is about ThemeForest themes not wasting my employees valuable time and my money paying them to support poorly developed themes.

A side effect of this is we help these customers fix these crap themes. And then they’ll never buy a ThemeForest theme again. This impacts ThemeForest and Envato. Not the author.

Standards and guidelines help prevent situations like this. Quit fighting. Accept it. Find a way to work with it. Your work will be better for it. Envato is doing a good thing.

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ChapterThemes says

@carlhancock – i’m replying like this to avoid another big quote:

I totaly agree with you :) With every single thing you said in that last reply.

But my point was about having or creating a shared plugin, creating shared names for shortcodes and even creating shared names for posttypes as mentioned by someone earlier.

For the everything else you say: i agree and it’s a good thing.

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Jaynesh says

@carlhancock – i’m replying like this to avoid another big quote:

I totaly agree with you :) With every single thing you said in that last reply.

But my point was about having or creating a shared plugin, creating shared names for shortcodes and even creating shared names for posttypes as mentioned by someone earlier.

For the everything else you say: i agree and it’s a good thing.

Hi, me again.

I really don’t see what the issue is about have standard names for things like post types. You can still have your own additional features but wouldn’t it be better if everybody used standard names for common post types so all the data can still be accessed?

If a buyer wants to switch a theme, he’s not going to want to use the previous themes features and design elements. Imagine a buyer switching from Avada to Gridlocked. Why would the buyer use Avada’s portfolio or shortcodes on his new theme?

Wouldn’t it be better to make sure that the data is still intact and let the theme handle everything else?

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partnuz says


Bottom line:

This is a market place. Authors want to sell, authors want to be different from the rest. And yes, it’s a good thing that we moving more towards the good practices and uses as WordPress.org intended, but this is still a market place: no place for happy opensource wordpress plugin packages for all to share so we all get themes with all the same shortcode happiness.

edit: besides, most authors already share enough – which is a good thing at the level it’s going on now..

This has nothing to do with WordPress.org. This has to do with the great WordPress community, including the commercial market as a whole.

If you don’t know who I am, I am one of the co-founders of Gravity Forms. One of the most successful commercial WordPress plugins on the market. 99% of our support issues related to theme conflicts we encounter are caused by poorly developed ThemeForest themes. 99%. This is a fact.

I can tell you with 99% accuracy when one of our support team encounters a conflict caused by a poorly developed theme that the theme is from ThemeForest. Sadly i’m not exaggerating at all.

What ThemeForest authors that don’t know what they are doing don’t realize is how their work impacts others. Our company has wasted more money in support time dealing with issues caused by poorly developed ThemeForest themes than you’ve made in your entire time selling WordPress themes.

All this could be avoided by simply following best practices… guidelines being implemented by Envato now.

I don’t give a damn if this makes Theme Authors get in the good graces with WordPress.org or the open source communithy, what I give a damn is about ThemeForest themes not wasting my employees valuable time and my money paying them to support poorly developed themes.

A side effect of this is we help these customers fix these crap themes. And then they’ll never buy a ThemeForest theme again. This impacts ThemeForest and Envato. Not the author.

Standards and guidelines help prevent situations like this. Quit fighting. Accept it. Find a way to work with it. Your work will be better for it. Envato is doing a good thing.

Could you elaborate ? Are these css namespacing issues or lack of standard wp hooks ? Could you share some examples ?

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designedbydash says

I could be wrong but I don’t think I saw it on the list, if we’re getting all technical with keeping things that WP does as standard in our themes then one thing I think needs adding:

Keeping classes on default WP functionality. For example, you occasionally see themes that forget to include %2$s on the sidebar classes, which I imagine is something that should be enforced.

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aligatorstudio says

I don’t give a damn if this makes Theme Authors get in the good graces with WordPress.org or the open source communithy, what I give a damn is about ThemeForest themes not wasting my employees valuable time and my money paying them to support poorly developed themes.
Why don’t you:
  • include notice (upon plugin activation, in FAQ, site… ) that you don’t provide support if buyer uses TF theme,
  • if someone contact you for support, first ask if he/she is using TF theme and then decline support if it does

We know the answer to that, don’t we – if you decline TF themes, you’ll lose many clients don’t you. TF themes actually are contributing your sales, too. So please, count this fact into your calculation with money. ;)

In most, I agree with you – many themes on Theme forest are poorly coded. I personally never worked with Gravity Forms so our themes never had issues with it.

Fact – 90% of our issues with themes/plugins (WooCommerce mostly) was produced by: poorly configured servers, ignorant buyers, plugins and extension conflicts (many, many plugin authors, even those on wp.org code badly). 10% might be our, not so perfect, coding :) . Fact

Standards are necessary (god knows how many times I wondered and asked for announcement like this) , but I strongly believe that many TF authors pushed Wordpress to what it is and it stands for today, with their “not standard WP coding”.

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aligatorstudio says

Ok … I didn’t read all 75 pages of this thread, but most of them… My conclusion – it’s time – let’s fork Wordpress !! Let’s call it, I don’t know , ThemeForestPress !... :P

Who knows, maybe collaboration between Theme forest and WooThemes would be the best combination for forking Wordpress … just an idea … ;) + top TF and CodeCanyon developers …. ?

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ChapterThemes says


@carlhancock – i’m replying like this to avoid another big quote:

I totaly agree with you :) With every single thing you said in that last reply.

But my point was about having or creating a shared plugin, creating shared names for shortcodes and even creating shared names for posttypes as mentioned by someone earlier.

For the everything else you say: i agree and it’s a good thing.

Hi, me again.

I really don’t see what the issue is about have standard names for things like post types. You can still have your own additional features but wouldn’t it be better if everybody used standard names for common post types so all the data can still be accessed?

If a buyer wants to switch a theme, he’s not going to want to use the previous themes features and design elements. Imagine a buyer switching from Avada to Gridlocked. Why would the buyer use Avada’s portfolio or shortcodes on his new theme?

Wouldn’t it be better to make sure that the data is still intact and let the theme handle everything else?

Hi! Just one more reply before i’ll leave this thread – since you quoted me :)

There is no real issue, it just has no benefit. No matter what you call you’re post type, it will be accessible in the backend for every theme ( if it’s through a plugin, which is still the mayor case of the whole new requirements ).

Now you say for yourself, when switching themes one doesn’t need the same features – then why bothering to use shared names anyway. Besides that, if a plugin ( and theme ) is written properly also the new theme ( every theme ) will work and can even show the content of the post type at the front-end. Also, you can provide an option to let people restyle the front-end styling of the plugin. Just like WooCommerce for example. WooCommerce works in every proper coded theme and if not it provides some little functions to make it work anyway. People can give their own styling to it. But it works, even if they call their product post type “wcprodstxyz”, which is not a good name but you’ll get the point :)

Also, if you want a theme to be compatible with whatever plugin, you go and see how to implement and style that plugin to match your theme. You check out what post type they use IF they use it etc.

Just having some global namings does not ease things up or make things work. Example:

Rule: from now on every portfolio feature that uses a CPT must use the CPT name ‘portfolio’.

1. I create a portfolio plugin and use the CPT name ‘portfolio’. I maybe have some thoughts on how to make some features for it, and i create the option to have multiple portfolio pictures in one portfolio post. So i create a custom function to load multiple images and i don’t use the featured image option.

2. Someone else creates a portfolio plugin. Uses the same CPT name ‘portfolio’. He creates maybe a simpler version and uses the featured image option to show a portfolio image. Besides that he creates some custom meta fields for project data to show on the front-end.

Now one wants to create a new theme that supports the ‘portfolio’ post type. But now what? He still needs to checkout the plugin he wants to support because of their different features – even if they used the same ‘portfolio’ post type.

Another problem: What if people want to use two portfolio plugins, maybe to match the work they want to show with different portfolio layouts, options or whatever. Then you’ll have two plugins using the same CPT and that’s not gonna work: CPT’s always will need their own unique name in different plugins. And creating plugins to go with the themes is the biggest point of the whole new requirements.

Pf what a reply… :) i’ll be going busy with my new plugin! Cheers

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ThemeCeption says

Waiting for more clarifications. Some examples would be great regarding to shortcode/plugin issue as that would help many of us in a great way. Thanks :)

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