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M-Theme says

The point here is that the user should keep the same layout and functions even after they switch themes. But that’s simply not possible.

First, we’re not creating simple blog themes like wordpress.org to apply all their standards and keep the functionality out. Of course, when you have just blog posts and that’s all, it’s extremely easy to apply all those standards, but those themes are just not for ThemeForest.

And, how do you think the elements will look like on a completely new theme? It will look ok? Surely NOT. Because each theme has its styling and its individual layout, if it breaks up, who will support him? The theme author? Of course not, because he doesn’t have anything to do with the plugin. The ThemeForest author? Not a chance, why would he provide support for someone that uses another theme?

I can’t agree with this, not when we create complex themes.

That’s right! Every authors here have own shortcodes functions, and each theme has the own styles for the shortcodes.

Unless envato teams give us a public shortcode plugins. Otherwise it can’t be a plugin that can be used for all the themes.

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FinalDestiny says

Moving towards a plugin centric is a good idea however for it to work I think we will also need some standardized plugins for the common theme features. Otherwise, we are going to end up with 1000 different shortcode plugins, 1000 different portfolio plugins, etc which is going to make things just as complicated. I know this was something that was suggested a while back but I don’t know how far the idea progressed.

That’s not good. Maybe one uses bootstrap for all their themes, maybe another uses skeleton, limiting the authors to certain plugins is like limiting clients from modifying the themes they buy

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LubosVolovar says

The shortcodes as plugins solution is realy nice in theory, but I really can’t imagine how authors can maintain current complexity of their themes (in terms of design) with this solution and without the support issues mentioned by @FinalDestiny . I think that this requirement really needs much more deeper disccusion before will be considered as a solid part of theme requirements.

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M-Theme says

Also, if we add more plugins in the theme. I think the users will not happy.

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aleluja says

The user can pay a freelancer to modify the css and get the look he wants. It CAN be done if the shortcodes are in a plugin, with shortcodes put into the theme it can’t. It is better to have generic looking shortcodes than [shortcode] tags all over the place.

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FinalDestiny says

The user can pay a freelancer to modify the css and get the look he wants. It CAN be done if the shortcodes are in a plugin, with shortcodes put into the theme it can’t. It is better to have generic looking shortcodes than [shortcode] tags all over the place.

The user can pay a freelancer do adjust the old-shortcodes to the look of the new theme as well. It’s not our job to recreate the user’s website when he decides to change it. We’re selling complete websites here, not maintenance support services.

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Siddharth Envato team says

Hey everyone!

I’m the Review Projects Lead on this specific project and I’d like to clarify a few things for you guys.


If a theme uses the HTML5 doctype, it needs to make proper use of all associated HTML5 tags. 
I would like this step to be elaborated. What does proper use of all associated HTML5 tags mean? Is there a case that I wouldn’t want to use an HTML tag “improperly” in any version?

This is meant to discourage authors from marketing a theme as HTML5 compliant whilst not using the relevant semantic elements. This is meant to be more of a house clean-up as we’d like ThemeForest themes to be truly HTML5 compliant, not just in name but in essence.


No inline styles are allowed any where.
So instead of doing
<div id="post-128" style="background-color: blue">
Lorem
</div>
I now have to do? :
<style>
#post-128 {
background-color: blue;
}
</style>
<div id="post-128"> Lorem </div>
That seems a bit like an overkill, at least in a post list where for example the user has set the color of the post via options himself.

Dynamically generated inline styles are inextricably linked to customization and are fine. I’ll clean up the language in the docs. Using inline styles during the design phase is lazy and needs to be avoided.


Keep media queries grouped by media at the bottom of the stylesheet. 
No. This is simply wrong to limit authors to this.

Having media queries strewn all through the stylesheet makes it difficult to locate and edit things for buyers. This is one step that we’ve had to take to make theme customization by buyers that tiny bit easier.


Javascript: The code shouldn’t raise any errors or notices.
In what ? Console?

Indeed, kind sir!


Any author-written JavaScript code should be JSHint compliant.
What is the exception list ? For example, CoffeeScript indents code in a way that JSHint doesn’t like.
Code ‘stylistic’ warnings can exempted. JSHint has been added to make sure a theme’s code is structurally and empirically sound.
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M-Theme says


The user can pay a freelancer to modify the css and get the look he wants. It CAN be done if the shortcodes are in a plugin, with shortcodes put into the theme it can’t. It is better to have generic looking shortcodes than [shortcode] tags all over the place.
The user can pay a freelancer do adjust the old-shortcodes to the look of the new theme as well. It’s not our job to recreate the user’s website when he decides to change it. We’re selling complete websites here, not maintenance support services.

Yes, the shortcode should be a part of the theme, not as a plugin.

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nagaemas says

I’m thinking of creating a shortcode manager plugin, that by default registers a collection of commonly used shortcodes. This plugin should also be extendable so adding new shortcodes is always possible whether it’s via another plugin/theme.

The default shortcodes here, should by default be rendered using a specific framework so it can maintain its appearance regardless of the theme.

For example, build the columns and elements on Bootstrap, enqueue by default the CSS and JS for Bootstrap and pass the HTML output via filters where you can customize it specific to your theme. (this makes it easy to turn a Bootstrap column into Skeleton grids or anything) As for the styles, create the functionality to turn off the default styles/just simply override the styles on your theme.

This doesn’t guarantee that the shortcodes works perfectly on every theme, but at least the users won’t see unparsed shortcode tags on the site, but instead see a not so bad looking elements as they are by default styled using Bootstrap.

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bitfade says

The user can pay a freelancer to modify the css and get the look he wants. It CAN be done if the shortcodes are in a plugin, with shortcodes put into the theme it can’t. It is better to have generic looking shortcodes than [shortcode] tags all over the place.
they won’t. Instead, they will ask theme author why the output looks completely different and/or breaks horribly the new theme layout and demand a fix.

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