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crozer says

out of context stats like that don’t really mean anything. I think every site should be approached on a case by case basis, but generally speaking I think as developers it is our duty to be as backwardly compatible as possible. I really don’t believe that putting a “tax” on older browsers is acceptable however, in this case I believe it was a marketing ploy (which has obviously worked for them, earning them tonnes of authority links and lots of social chatter). I really don’t think that taking the stance of “old browsers can screw off” is professional – we should always provide some form of fallback to ensure that sites are functional, and as stated earlier – don’t do something silly like charge extra $$$ because the user is running out of date software!

Then don’t. Developers that will ignore a 6-year-old platform will have a brighter future.

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matt5409 says


out of context stats like that don’t really mean anything. I think every site should be approached on a case by case basis, but generally speaking I think as developers it is our duty to be as backwardly compatible as possible. I really don’t believe that putting a “tax” on older browsers is acceptable however, in this case I believe it was a marketing ploy (which has obviously worked for them, earning them tonnes of authority links and lots of social chatter). I really don’t think that taking the stance of “old browsers can screw off” is professional – we should always provide some form of fallback to ensure that sites are functional, and as stated earlier – don’t do something silly like charge extra $$$ because the user is running out of date software!
Then don’t. Developers that will ignore a 6-year-old platform will have a brighter future.

how does that make ANY sense?

you guys, honestly, sound like you threw your toys out of the pram a long time ago over IE. this industry is growing up – legacy software won’t always be the pain it has been, but you need to get over it now. support it if the user base calls for it, otherwise simply check that the site is functional.

it really is in your best interests to look after ALL users, and yes, that might mean a few extra hours and a bit of a headache. but making a site functional shouldn’t be a massive issue (JS and server side stuff works fine in IE6 !)

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matt5409 says

obviously we all carry our own values and opinions. I thought this was pretty appropriate and funny http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/duty_calls.png

:)

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crozer says



out of context stats like that don’t really mean anything. I think every site should be approached on a case by case basis, but generally speaking I think as developers it is our duty to be as backwardly compatible as possible. I really don’t believe that putting a “tax” on older browsers is acceptable however, in this case I believe it was a marketing ploy (which has obviously worked for them, earning them tonnes of authority links and lots of social chatter). I really don’t think that taking the stance of “old browsers can screw off” is professional – we should always provide some form of fallback to ensure that sites are functional, and as stated earlier – don’t do something silly like charge extra $$$ because the user is running out of date software!
Then don’t. Developers that will ignore a 6-year-old platform will have a brighter future.

how does that make ANY sense?

you guys, honestly, sound like you threw your toys out of the pram a long time ago over IE. this industry is growing up – legacy software won’t always be the pain it has been, but you need to get over it now. support it if the user base calls for it, otherwise simply check that the site is functional.

it really is in your best interests to look after ALL users, and yes, that might mean a few extra hours and a bit of a headache. but making a site functional shouldn’t be a massive issue (JS and server side stuff works fine in IE6 !)

That’s precisely the point, it is not in our best interest. Trust me, everything I produce works in IE7 , but if I feel like developing something contemporary and fresh, I will not limit myself due to IE7 . Furthermore, the user-base is quite minimal, making it IMO worth the “hey, please update” risk. When producing for a massive marketplace, you need to consider and build yourself a performance/time ratio, as with pretty much anything in life. And in the end, the time it takes you to make a (new, advanced, off-of-new-technologies) site work flawlessly in IE7 , is time you could spend on being more productive.

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CodeLion says


I think -

As a web development idea, it’s utterly tragic. And it goes against what all true devs aspire to – to create a website which is accessible to all users, regardless of device (and certainly not penalising them!)

IE must die. End of conversation.
+1
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Brendon27 says



I think -

As a web development idea, it’s utterly tragic. And it goes against what all true devs aspire to – to create a website which is accessible to all users, regardless of device (and certainly not penalising them!)

IE must die. End of conversation.
+1

Another +1

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coatsrc says

I dont know how I feel about being charged for using IE7 but I definitely believe it is necessary to charge folks for IE6 …I just think it is unnecessary for developers to spend tons of hours on a project just for it to work in IE6 (especially if it takes all but 5 minutes for the user to just update their browser for free).

I know its about making things accessible to everyone but what about the developers? I feel its unnecessary for developers to have jump through a gazillion hoops of fire just to display something for a stubborn audience who does not want to upgrade for whatever reason.

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RikdeVos says

LOL ! But aren’t IE users suffering enough already ;)

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WPExplorer says

Good idea. Move this thread to “site feedback” so we can get the tax added to our themes. ;)

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Australia says

Quote: Microsoft has released several new versions since 2006, however, which are better regarded.

In 2007 they released internet explorer 1985 .

In 2008 they released internet explorer comic sans edition.

In 2009 they released internet explorer 1987

In 2010 they had a break

In 2011 they released internet explorer activex edition

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