100 posts Norris & Tanita
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ThemeVillage says

I just saw a theme that completely fails to display anything without JavaScript.

I am interested in your approach to JavaScript when developing and if you have ever had trouble getting your theme approved because of it ?

I make sure all the time if what I do degrades good enough back to JavaScript, across screen sizes, but once every now and then I see a theme here lying around with bad bugs, or even non-functional at all. Shouldn’t we warn people who use those themes, that are bad for accessibility and SEO, or at least that they’re only good with JavaScript on ?

I’m all for progressive enhancement, but is that a non-existant criteria here on TF due to the small amount ( I believe it’s somewhere <3% ) of non-js browsers ?

I know that the bottom line is how much you care about the quality of your own theme, but I’m interested in what do you think is the optimal approach here ?

http://programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/25969/should-i-bother-to-develop-for-javascript-disabled
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rvision_ says

Only

If your site relies on JS for content and links then chances are search-engines will be ignoring large chunks of it.

(excerpt from stackexchange comment)

Sliders, menus, etc. – have no real impact on SEO.

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Arcodea says

I’m a designer/developer with 20 years experience (although I don’t currently sell anything on TF).

You absolutely MUST make sure that a website is useful to visitors in a basic form. It’s fine to add extra features that only work with JavaScript, but these should been seen as enhancements, not part of the core offering. The Web is all about universaility, and giving access to content for all users (regardless of their technical setup) is a primary goal of any good, conscientious developer.

Just last night I bought a HTML template from here that does NOTHING if JavaScript is disabled. That’s not good enough, and is not even what one could consider meeting a baseline standard for a usable, accessible template. I’ve requested a refund as it is not fit for purpose.

In the future I would hope that Envato re-consider their approval process for templates that don’t meet basic web standards.

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theAlThemist says

Simple answer – NO! :) javascript-off smells like ‘90s to me. Every phone, tablet and computer supports JS. Those that don’t – well… let’s say they are not my target. TF is a place for modern web design.

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ThemeVillage says

Only
If your site relies on JS for content and links then chances are search-engines will be ignoring large chunks of it.

(excerpt from stackexchange comment)

Sliders, menus, etc. – have no real impact on SEO.

Only if your theme is completely non-functional, with content pulled in with AJAX, Search Engines are going to ignore large chu….everything on the page, having a real impact on SEO.

Yeah. Sure. Go crazy on sliders. There is no reasonable No-js sliders (without going hardcore on CSS) to fallback on, and I don’t think that we should worry about that too much, just make sure you display a fallback image/images when JS is off and it’s fine and dandy to me. Not my point.

I’m interested in what you care(think) about when you develop your themes and where do you draw the line, or you’re just perfectly fine dropping No-JS Support at all, because after all, No-JS Browsers are less than IE7’s, right ?

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ChapterThemes says

Simple answer – NO! :) javascript-off smells like ‘90s to me. Every phone, tablet and computer supports JS. Those that don’t – well… let’s say they are not my target. TF is a place for modern web design.

+1 , JS is standard, allthough not everyone would agree with that.

Making things work for JS disabled is just like still making your website completely work in explorer 6. Sometimes you gotta let go and move forward.

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UXbarn says

Simple answer – NO! :) javascript-off smells like ‘90s to me. Every phone, tablet and computer supports JS. Those that don’t – well… let’s say they are not my target. TF is a place for modern web design.

+1. Couldn’t agree more. :)

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Arcodea says

+1 , JS is standard, allthough not everyone would agree with that.

Making things work for JS disabled is just like still making your website completely work in explorer 6. Sometimes you gotta let go and move forward.

There’s a few minimum standards that all websites should adhere to: one of them is displaying content using markup so that it’s accessible to the widest amount of people as possible. Those people may be using modern browsers, older browsers, smartphones or tablets and they may even be using screen-readers for accessibility or other similar tools. You don’t have to make your content look or work the same on older browsers, but it should at least be accessible.

Sites that require JS to render content cause masisve problems for many users as they make it very hard for enabling technologies to understand how a page is structured, where the content is, etc. And as others have pointed out, it makes it hard to bookmark content or create any decent SEO opportunities. Yes, there are technical solutions to some of these issues, but if you’ve constructed a proper web page in the first place, you shouldn’t need extra functionality to make it accessible.

Look at Twitter: They converted their entire site over to a JS model for user pages using hashbangs (#!) in the URL. This broke all sorts of things for many different types of users. After a massive outcry they rrealised they’d made a big mistake, and reverted back to simpler techniques that did not rely on JS. (Their site still doesn’t fully work without JS, but that’s a story for another day… :-) )

You should make every effort to have real content fallbacks on your site. If you’re building sites that have no content when JS is off, then you might want to consider changing your development approach.

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ChapterThemes says

There’s a few minimum standards that all websites should adhere to: one of them is displaying content using markup so that it’s accessible to the widest amount of people as possible. Those people may be using modern browsers, older browsers, smartphones or tablets and they may even be using screen-readers for accessibility or other similar tools. You don’t have to make your content look or work the same on older browsers, but it should at least be accessible. Sites that require JS to render content cause masisve problems…

Agree, rendering the ‘main’ content of a site with JS has always been a bad idea.

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ThemePrince says

I always use a top notification line which warns users to turn on javascript for the maximum experience. It appears only when JS is off.

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