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ThemeKioken says

Well, you would save us a lot more time if you once and forever stop trying to make browsers. :D

That my friend, is the best quote of 2011 :D

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Joost Moderator says

I’m shocked by the amount of people who are saying they’re not supporting IE7 . At 11% market share, they’re (unfortunately) still quite a factor.. I’d hate for one out of 10 users to not be able to view my site properly.

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bitpub says

I not only support IE7 but I also go out of my way to make sure that the site works in IE6 as well.

I feel that this is especially important for business websites where any visitor that can’t interact with the website because of his browser is possible lost business.

Also, like it has been mentioned before I don’t know what the big problem with IE 7 is. Besides some problems with z-index I have never had problems with IE7 . Granted it depends on how much new stuff you want to use ( html5, css3 etc) and how complex the template is, but I still think that with smart coding and progressive enhancement you can still make awesome templates that degrade gracefully in older browsers but are still functional in them.

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christopherjon says
The quicker you people stop supporting the train wrecks that are Microsoft’s browsers, the quicker they will be phased out.

Absolutely wrong.

Surfers will see the site as a broken piece of crap and move on. Whoever runs that website just lost a customer.

you’re just limiting your creativity and hindering the use of powerful tools such as CSS3 and HTML5 which will result in loss of a LOT more sales than not supporting a browser whose market share is under 5%.
Creativity is for artists and personal portfolios.

Businesses want their websites to be as accessible to as many people as possible. Outside of the web design world nobody cares about CSS3 or HTML5 . CSS3 and HTML5 don’t increase a businesses profits but accessibility and user experience do.

There is a reason why most internet marketing websites (websites that actually make money) are bare bones and ugly. They work and they convert. WP themes that are designed for internet marketing easily sell for $97 and up but would never be accepted here because they aren’t very sexy looking.

Everyone complains about studiopress being old, boring and not up to themeforest standards but that guys outsells all of you combined.

There is also a reason why you don’t see any of the latest cutting edge coolness on any major website. They care about user experience and reaching as many people as possible.

IE browsers, love ‘em or hate ‘em are still very widely used. The majority of surfers are using a version of IE.

If you care about accessibility and user experience, IE should be the browser you build your sites to, not chrome or firefox.

If all you care about is impressing other designers, by all means, knock yourself out.

Now somebody go answer my nivo slider cleartype problem!

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Joost Moderator says

Oh and in case you havn’t heard it yet: IE is being mean to me ;)

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libra-online says

the thing is, normal users don’t give a damn about updating browsers, they sometimes don’t even know what an update is. heck, some don’t even know what a browser is, when i ask some clients who have problems with the site, what they use to surf the net they say google. and if the startpage of the browser is not google they are lost, and say the internet is gone. we must program for people like these, because these ignorants sometimes are full of $$$ and are the potential buyers for a lot of other people. we are all browser-aware tech people here, so it is normal we are frustrated. but as christopherjon says, the visitors don’t care about design. they only care to find the info/product they are looking for. when a site they find is broken they don’t blame their crappy browsers, they blame you and your webpage, and say you are unproffessional. i am still to upload my first web template here, but i usually take care of such things as graceful degradation, and there is an option for my buyers to activate an alert in case of old browsers, that says, to update it in order to have the full multimedia experience of the website. this is just my point of view, and in my experience, i had the most problems with very under-educated people, but they for some reason had the most money to spend too, and they didn’t care about my excuses for browsers, or anything else, they just want everything to “work”. so i try to make it work, even if the design is not top notch in terms of technology used. there are exceptions too of course, but we cannot change the way an user thinks. we can try though. but if we try to force it, the only ones to suffer the consequences are we ourselves.

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redfactory says

When it comes down to it, you should just do whatever you feel is best for your buyers (and thus your sales). I know I will be supporting IE7 for some time if it’s not to much work, which it usually isn’t. If you use css3pie there are not much things that are not possible in IE7 and IE8 .

I feel that for the coming few months I, as an author, will have an edge with my support for IE7 . It will eventually die out, but not just quite yet ;)

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curtisaallen says

Yes, I support IE7 .

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bitpub says

I feel that for the coming few months I, as an author, will have an edge with my support for IE7 .

+1 I feel the same way. That’s why I support IE6 as well :)

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fillerspace says

I feel that for the coming few months I, as an author, will have an edge with my support for IE7 . It will eventually die out, but not just quite yet ;)

That’s why my first theme supports ie6,7,8, and 9. If it gets me a few more sales, it’s worth it. I think about cross browser compatibility during the whole design process, so it isn’t a huge shock at the end of a project. Aside from adding ddbelatedpng and fixing a few floats and z-index issues, ie6 and 7 weren’t much trouble. Probably an additional 2 to 3 hours. 5 sales will make that time worthwhile.

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