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sixtrot says

Dear Buyers,

I want to know what exactly you look in for a theme.

Well, everyone is keen on design and additional functionality but what I wanted to know is the layout structure, like for instance: will you buy a theme without sidebars and widgets only in the footer?

Also comment on menu position. Pls, add more info so designers can understand what exactly a customer wants.

Thanks.

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hogash says

It’s ok to ask feedback from buyers, however i’m sure most of them don’t know exactly what they want, they expect to see something which suddenly ‘empowers’ their imagination. Just few browse this website and know exactly what they want.

I always walked on the principle that DESIGN SELLS, and the CODE KEEPS THE CLIENT LOYAL. And the other cases are just exceptions from the rule. But anyway that’s my opinion.

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biyanpasau says

A good designer should know what people want based on his limitation.

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psvent says

A good designer should know what people want based on his limitation.

What does one have to do with the other? This statement doesn’t make any sense to me.

“What people want” is called market research and generally if you are an Web Designer then your only limitation is you imagination. The corner stones of good web design are well know and measurable (type, color, vertical rhythm, layout) everything else is just aesthetics which are measured on a subjective basis.

But back to the OP you can do some market research yourself by browsing thru popular items. It seems themes that bundle premium plugins (let’s forget that it’s bad practice) seem to do well. Also themes that pack tons of features (even if it’s 20+ shortcodes to handle just the layout grid – the total number matters :)) also do well.

And then you have some “outsiders” that are doing things right and produces well designed and executed themes, but they have more or less a solid base of loyal customers that appreciate the good work.

I would suggest taking some time and researching popular items. You can learn valuable information from that alone. Go thru top 10 items and ask yourself: Why are they so popular? Compare prices, features, go thru comments, etc.

I guess this is the only way and I even if 10 buyers will respond to your question that is in no way an indicator of what would sell well.

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biyanpasau says

What does one have to do with the other? This statement doesn’t make any sense to me. “What people want” is called market research and generally if you are an Web Designer then your only limitation is you imagination. The corner stones of good web design are well know and measurable (type, color, vertical rhythm, layout) everything else is just aesthetics which are measured on a subjective basis.

And doing research is not just about asking people about “what the want”, right? A good designer – Based on the thread, I prefer to say “developer” eventhough they both are different – should know that.

About imagination, so, You think a skill that required to create a psds to a theme, adding some features, functions, etc is not a limitation? Oh, I see…it’s just an imagination and abrakadabra You are done. This statement doesn’t make any sense to me.

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psvent says

Yes people actually don’t know what they want so I wouldn’t even ask them but stick to market research.

You are mentioning skills that refer to both profiles, Web Designer and Web Developer, and yes if you consider yourself either than the skills you mention should not be a limitation.

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biyanpasau says

You know why too much rejection over here, because they do not know their limitation.

Back to the topic, Sixtrot, what exactly you want to hear from buyer. I guess the popular files already has.

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familychoice says

It’s ok to ask feedback from buyers, however i’m sure most of them don’t know exactly what they want, they expect to see something which suddenly ‘empowers’ their imagination.

From what I’ve seen a lot of the most regular customers on here run their own web businesses and know exactly what they want, and these are the customers developer should be supporting as they provide repeat business.

I run a web company and use themes for clients with low budgets, so a pre-built them should do the following things:

1. Be quick to set up with excellent documentation. If I have to use support to ask how to achieve layout features in the demo then the documentation has failed and wasted my time.

2. Have good, fast support. Without this a theme is useful, regardless of some developers feelings that this is an optional extra. Themes require ongoing support, updates and bug fixing so having no support is not an option.

3. Have few bugs. A month after purchasing a recent theme I bought, to save time on a personal project, I was still finding and reporting bugs to the developer. 6 weeks after purchase it still didn’t work – so much for saving time. Instead I provided a free bug testing service.

4. Good clean, well coded, easy to update, flexible design.

5. Ongoing updates. Before buying I check out developers old themes – if they’ve left them to rot in preference for knocking out new versions then I’ll avoid them like the plague. The Avada theme is a good example of a well supported theme. I’ll be purchasing that one next and the developer is top of my preferred list of authors.

For me the theme itself is only 50% of the product – ongoing updates, support and good documentation are just as important.

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sixtrot says

thanks for the replies :-)

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natmicon says

In order of personal importance:

1) Clean Code // Documentation is important but clean, semantic code can be understood even without it.

2) Typography // The most important visual element of a theme for me. Good typography can make or break a theme.

3) Clean design // This will vary by individual taste, obviously, but I look for designs that look uncluttered and modern. There is definitely a line here where a theme becomes so minimal that it’s boring.

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