105 posts
  • Has sold $100+ on Envato Market
  • Located in Romania
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
SecondaryMood says


take amd fx 8350 instead of i7,it is a LOT cheaper and its 8-core.you will save a lot of money that you can spend on some audio gear that is more important,also 32gb of ram is overkill,you wont be able to tell the difference between 32gb and 16gb,even 8gb is more than enough for any kind of work.buy some quality motherboard

Do not compare AMD with Intel. AMD is cheaper, slower and older technology. Even if an AMD processor is 8-core, a 4-core Intel will show better results.

“8gb is more than enough for any kind of work” – again, this is your oppinion for what you do but not everyone have the same job. You’ll be able to see the difference if you work with multiple programs in parallel, trust me.

@RachidLaasri, don’t buy a pre-built PC, make your own by pieces and here is what I recommend:
  • 4th Generation Intel Processor.
  • 16GB+ RAM, min 1600MHz – Corsair is a good company
  • SSD – it is better(but is expensive), no noises, faster, and requires less energy.
  • A good video Card – min 1GB, 256bit+, with at least one HDMI and one DVI port(I would recommend to search for one with 4 ports).

Nice advice! How about the motherboard?

1045 posts
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
  • Made it to the Authors' Hall of Fame
  • Had an item featured on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
+4 more
simaudio says

Build your computer, don’t buy a prebuilt one like Dell:) It’s very simple to do and you’ll be able to customize it to your hearts content. While it might be harder to troubleshoot if something goes wrong compared to a traditional setup, you can get better parts, and the parts that typically fail first (RAM, HDD) have warranties that’d last much longer then a prebuilt system like a Dell.

Great advice! You’ll also get some great satisfaction out of it as well.

I built a new system a little while back and used a Asus pro motherboard, 32gb of ram ,I7….I’m very happy with it and saved a load of cash, just figure out what you want and go from there.

Helpful site;

http://uk.pcpartpicker.com/

Just make sure all your parts will be compatible. Good luck :)

217 posts
  • Made it to the Authors' Hall of Fame
  • Member of the Envato Team
  • Had an item featured on Envato Market
  • Contributed a free file of the month
+13 more
Crusader12 Envato team says

Absolutely the truth about building your own computer – the only way to go if you want top quality parts. Even the most expensive computers on the market cut corners to make a profit.

I’ve been building them since the 90s and have never bought a brand name computer. If you want to build your own, here are some pointers:

Last time I heard, AMD wasn’t doing that well. I’ve always stuck with Intel, but tried AMD on my last build since they were ahead of the game at the time. I’ve been very pleased with it so far. Even hough they are cheaper, the products are quality and I’ll consider going AMD again (if they’re still around). Whatever decision you make will determine the type of motherboard you purchase because of the CPU socket. Lastly, AMD is a much better chip to overclock (and has a more lively overclocking community) than Intel.

MB – Asus if #1. I tried a Gigabyte last time and was disappointed. The main thing to shop for here is ram capacity and Front Side Bus Speed (how fast the CPU can talk to the board).

SSD – brand names here are pretty much whatever memory company you trust. I like Kingston, but Corsair is great as well. The main reason you’ll want an SSD over a mechanical drive is speed. However, these things are not indestructible and don’t give any warning signs before bricking themselves like mechanical drives. You’ll want a large mechanical drive on the sidelines for your backup.

RAM – I’ve been running tons of programs while 3D rendering in the background using only 12GB without any issues at all. There isn’t any point any putting a ton of ram on your system, throw your money at one of the most important components in the computer:

Video Card – To get a pro video card means you’ll need lots of power. Plan on buying at least an 800W power supply. Cooler Master is my favorite here, but Antec is another good one. With the video card I’ve done both high end ATI and nvidia and like nvidia better. These can get expensive – costing more than an average laptop, but is well worth it.

Mechanical Keyboard – Keyboards from the 80s were built a million times better than the junk they sell today. Spend a couple hundred and get a nice mechanical keyboard (especially if you do a lot of typing like coding or writing, etc). They’re much better for your hands, and have that nostalgic clicky sound :p Razor has a lot of good options.

Don’t be intimidated by just buying the parts and putting them together, it’s a lot fun and will save you so much frustration and money in the long run…. and it’s always nice to know exactly what is inside your machine.

1834 posts
  • Has referred 10+ members
  • Has sold $40,000+ on Envato Market
  • Had an item featured in an Envato Bundle
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
+4 more
Bedros says

If you’re not looking to buy a “mobile” solution, then building your own pc would be best approach, IMHO.

1045 posts
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
  • Made it to the Authors' Hall of Fame
  • Had an item featured on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
+4 more
simaudio says

Absolutely the truth about building your own computer – the only way to go if you want top quality parts. Even the most expensive computers on the market cut corners to make a profit.

I’ve been building them since the 90s and have never bought a brand name computer. If you want to build your own, here are some pointers:

Last time I heard, AMD wasn’t doing that well. I’ve always stuck with Intel, but tried AMD on my last build since they were ahead of the game at the time. I’ve been very pleased with it so far. Even hough they are cheaper, the products are quality and I’ll consider going AMD again (if they’re still around). Whatever decision you make will determine the type of motherboard you purchase because of the CPU socket. Lastly, AMD is a much better chip to overclock (and has a more lively overclocking community) than Intel.

MB – Asus if #1. I tried a Gigabyte last time and was disappointed. The main thing to shop for here is ram capacity and Front Side Bus Speed (how fast the CPU can talk to the board).

SSD – brand names here are pretty much whatever memory company you trust. I like Kingston, but Corsair is great as well. The main reason you’ll want an SSD over a mechanical drive is speed. However, these things are not indestructible and don’t give any warning signs before bricking themselves like mechanical drives. You’ll want a large mechanical drive on the sidelines for your backup.

RAM – I’ve been running tons of programs while 3D rendering in the background using only 12GB without any issues at all. There isn’t any point any putting a ton of ram on your system, throw your money at one of the most important components in the computer:

Video Card – To get a pro video card means you’ll need lots of power. Plan on buying at least an 800W power supply. Cooler Master is my favorite here, but Antec is another good one. With the video card I’ve done both high end ATI and nvidia and like nvidia better. These can get expensive – costing more than an average laptop, but is well worth it.

Mechanical Keyboard – Keyboards from the 80s were built a million times better than the junk they sell today. Spend a couple hundred and get a nice mechanical keyboard (especially if you do a lot of typing like coding or writing, etc). They’re much better for your hands, and have that nostalgic clicky sound :p Razor has a lot of good options.

Don’t be intimidated by just buying the parts and putting them together, it’s a lot fun and will save you so much frustration and money in the long run…. and it’s always nice to know exactly what is inside your machine.

Great advice :)

I also run 3 monitors from the on board graphics using the I7 and Asus motherboard without any issues, it works fine for me but maybe you might want a decent graphics card for your needs? Something I can add when I want to….that’s the beauty of a self build…..you can always add or upgrade when you want :)

You don’t need to go 32gb of ram right from the start, just make sure you build in matched pairs, personally I felt It was something I needed to do as the old system was crashing all the time and slowed the workflow down, that was the only reason I built a new PC and went for 32gb of Ram ( the maximum that Mobo will take) as I didn’t want any of the old issues… of course you will need a 64bit OS.

159 posts
  • Has sold $100+ on Envato Market
  • Has been a beta tester for an Envato feature
  • Has collected 10+ items on Envato Market
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
+1 more
s4nji says

Anyone who wants to build, or buy a PC should really check this page. It is very rich with information: http://www.logicalincrements.com/

105 posts
  • Has sold $100+ on Envato Market
  • Located in Romania
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
SecondaryMood says

Thanks for sharing this information,guys….very useful!

104 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has sold $1,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 10+ items on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
+1 more
Deriggs007 says

If you have the money, you could almost forgo buying a traditional platter drive (HDD)

While SSD’s are still more expensive, within the past month they have dropped prices by a lot. You can pick up a 1tb SSD for roughly $350-$400. Which while it might be still somewhat ‘expensive’ compared to a normal 1TB drive. The quality of the part you’re getting (something that’ll last much longer then an HDD) and the fact that it performs 20x faster than a HDD, it’s worth the investment in my eyes. But this is JUST if you have the money.

For the RAM – I would recommend atleast 16gb, but pay attention to how much you use – It’s true that you’re not going to see a benefit with the more ram that you have, but if you’re doing a lot of work, like video editing or more. 16gigs still might not be enough for what you do, but if you want to save a little money and grab an 8gb kit and come back to add in another kit of it, that’s fine. I also agree with at least 1600mhz – This is the standard

Gskill has the best price/performance ratio. Corsair if you want the performance, but there are other good alternatives to both of these.

AMD vs Intel – I would definitely go INTEL for sure. UNLESS you’re looking for one of the chips with an onboard GPU, in which this case, AMD is ahead… but I would never recommend the onboard GPU over a stand alone card.

As for what generation of CPU you should get on the Intel side – Honestly, if you don’t mind overclocking or would enjoy giving that a go, I’d grab a 2700K if you can find one. You’ll spend less money, and these are ‘golden’ chip’s. Meaning these will overclock quite well. This is the chip I still have and I have it cooled under an Corsair H100 at 5.2ghz for everyday use, it is still cooler and faster then any 4770K running at 4.8ghz.. and to get a 4770K at 4.8ghz for every day use, you’ll need an actual water cooling loop :-)

The newer Intel chips skimped out on the internal cooling (solder vs’s a paste now) so they actually run much hotter when overclocking, nor do they overclock as well.

While AMD offers up more cores, most software does not take advantage of the extra cores today and if they DO take advantage of the cores, Intels architecture + speed still helps it to outperform an AMD setup. My advice is to just go for AMD only if you want to save money or need an onboard GPU built into the CPU (APU is what they’re called)

Motherboards, I would run with an Asus, but just do a review of the latest boards at http://www.newgg.com and see what people are grabbing now a days. Stay away from Asrock and Foxconn – While they do produce good boards, they also have the ‘worst’ ones as well.

For a GPU – It really doesn’t matter what you get. I’ve owned them all, and I’m the least biased person about GPU’s. They all have driver issues from time to time, and the performance is always about neck to neck. Personally, I’ve felt ATI AKA AMD has the better built cards and better price/performance ratio as of late. And I’m a person who is running Nvidia GPU’s.

For the brand’s on the GPU – MSI, Sapphire, EVGA, Asus are what I recommend. If you go with Nvidia, I would highly recommend getting an EVGA thanks to their customer satisfaction.

PSU’s. Corsair is great, same with Seasonic, again just do a quick review to see what’s being bought heavily right now.

Case – Just find one that you like. I personally have an NZXT Switch 810 and couldn’t be happier with it :-)

400 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 1 year
  • Has sold $1,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
  • Located in Serbia
BrancoG says


take amd fx 8350 instead of i7,it is a LOT cheaper and its 8-core.you will save a lot of money that you can spend on some audio gear that is more important,also 32gb of ram is overkill,you wont be able to tell the difference between 32gb and 16gb,even 8gb is more than enough for any kind of work.buy some quality motherboard

Do not compare AMD with Intel. AMD is cheaper, slower and older technology. Even if an AMD processor is 8-core, a 4-core Intel will show better results.

“8gb is more than enough for any kind of work” – again, this is your oppinion for what you do but not everyone have the same job. You’ll be able to see the difference if you work with multiple programs in parallel, trust me.

@RachidLaasri, don’t buy a pre-built PC, make your own by pieces and here is what I recommend:
  • 4th Generation Intel Processor.
  • 16GB+ RAM, min 1600MHz – Corsair is a good company
  • SSD – it is better(but is expensive), no noises, faster, and requires less energy.
  • A good video Card – min 1GB, 256bit+, with at least one HDMI and one DVI port(I would recommend to search for one with 4 ports).

older technology? for music production you need as much as cores as possible because EVERY new DAW will use all available cores if needed,fx 8350 (about 130eu) will destroy i5(about 190eu) in music production environment i know because i tried both.People look at game benchmarks and think intel is faster in professional programs too,but that is a mistake.As you increase number of tasks running at the same time (multiple tracks,multiple programs,plugins etc.) amd will smash i5 because it has 2x more cores, 2x more floating points and higher operating frequency.Of course,if you have a LOT of money,then just buy Haswell i7 and you don’t have to worry about your PC for years,possibly a decade.

217 posts
  • Made it to the Authors' Hall of Fame
  • Member of the Envato Team
  • Had an item featured on Envato Market
  • Contributed a free file of the month
+13 more
Crusader12 Envato team says

Don’t trust benchmarks.

Helpful Information

  • Please read our community guidelines. Self promotion and discussion of piracy is not allowed.
  • Open a support ticket if you would like specific help with your account, deposits or purchases.
  • Item Support by authors is optional and may vary. Please see the Support tab on each item page.

Most of all, enjoy your time here. Thank you for being a valued Envato community member.

Post Reply

Format your entry with some basic HTML. Read the Full Details, or here is a refresher:

<strong></strong> to make things bold
<em></em> to emphasize
<ul><li> or <ol><li> to make lists
<h3> or <h4> to make headings
<pre></pre> for code blocks
<code></code> for a few words of code
<a></a> for links
<img> to paste in an image (it'll need to be hosted somewhere else though)
<blockquote></blockquote> to quote somebody

:grin: :shocked: :cry: Complete List of Smiley Codes

by
by
by
by
by
by