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dubsbhoy says

I have two issues at the moment one with a website and one with a logo, each client is adamant they want what they want and are not open to logic and reason. The logo is so bad its more like a photograph at this stage and the guy with the website has basically taken a sledge hammer to it.

I’m sure you deal with this all the time so what is the outcome do you just take the payment and walk away or do you tell them to go elsewhere?

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dvhughes says

Yeah. I find that clients speak in code. Most don’t have any idea what they want, and will only know when they see it. Very importantly….if they mention something in passing, it means that that is what they want. You can make your reasoned argument, but one way or another…that silly giraffe they mentioned is gonna be in the logo they pay for. I tend to put my ego and judgement aside in these cases and just give them what they want, walk away and make a deposit. Good luck.

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LuisFaus says

Well it depends what they want the logo for; stationary or web or both.

If mainly stationary you should contact a printer and get them to give you the price for each additional color and other processes that may affect the increase of the printing budget of a client.

The next step is then inform the client that every additional color would cost X for printing – you can add a small percentage to the overall price so you can get a commission if you get the client to let you direct the printing processes -

Also, you should make clear in the beginning of every project how many initial designs they will get and how many changes are you willing to do for them – I always do 3 initial designs: One to their specifications, one of what I think it should be and a combination of both -.

When the client passes the quota of changes to the design, you should state in the quotation/invoice that each additional change would cost X much.

Of course in the terms and conditions of every quotation/invoice you should state: 50% in advance non returnable – just in case you give the goods and you never get paid back – , 50% for the handover of goods or if the project is longer than two weeks two last payments of 25% each – so you don’t run out of money-.

Additional to this in terms and conditions you should state that your prices are after tax and that all additional charges for transfer should be covered by the client.

What Im getting at is that if you state well what costs what and you put certain barriers where the client sees an increase in their spending budget they will then be more adamant to keep changing.

In the case of Web Design some of this can apply, however you can argue with the current trends in web design and innovation in your own designs and how would a certain requested change would affect the overall look of the clients brand identity on the eyes of the public. Always start your argument with “In my professional opinion” and ” From my own professional experience”.

And with that, it wins most arguments with clients, at least from my own personal and professional experience.

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dubsbhoy says

Cheers for the replies, my logo guy has seeing the light but as you said it needed me to show him in the flesh first that it was never going to pass as a logo but at least he’s listening now.

Website guy is like talking to a brick wall i’ve shown him my suggestions but no budge from him, I think i’ll just leave him to it.

I have been meaning to implement some kind of process for new clients but like everything to do with myself it’s been kept on the long finger, this is not my full time job so it’s hard to find the time to do everything except for new work that comes in. Lately its been hard to update a profile on a social network site never mind anything else.

I would love to have the guts to plunge into this full time and work for myself, my day time job is a million miles away from this kind of work and his just 40 hours a week of stress. I’ve read some people’s Bio’s on here who were in a similar position starting off but made the jump and done it full time but at the moment I can’t seem to let the piece of security go that my mortgage gets paid every month.

Again thanks for the replies I suppose I need to set some time aside and come up with a solid process.

Mark

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SomethingDesign says

I had this type of clients. If the client don’t understand / listen a professional advice, doesn’t worth to pay attention for their stupid ideas, do what they want (forget all what you know about design), take the money, trash that project and move forward. And don’t forget increase the price for extra revisions.

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dubsbhoy says

I had this type of clients. If the client don’t understand / listen a professional advice, doesn’t worth to pay attention for their stupid ideas, do what they want (forget all what you know about design), take the money, trash that project and move forward. And don’t forget increase the price for extra revisions.

Yeah I suppose it needs to get done at the end of the day, i think the saying “the customer is always right” shouldn’t apply to the above :)

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