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redfactory says

try adding custom widgets to a page or a post using only twentyten and no plugins. you will see when wp stops beeing nice. its good for simple websites. needs extras for bigger websites.
edit: and yea yea the backend is more simple to use than joomla… i know that. and i like wordpress more than joomla but it has some issues….

I include custom widgets with my themes too. No problems here.

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duotive says

its a problem out of the box. not with serious themes.

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campuscodi says

I remember this from an older WP official forum discussion. The amount of standard widgets in WP has been limited due to actual disk size and their wish not to cluther it. That’s why they introduced the automatic plugin installer in the backend. The WP core installs faster, is easier on their bandwidth and the plugin installer allows great customization without having to deal too much with FTP clients and manually moving files.

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duotive says

nice info :)

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Parallelus says

Forget WordPress ( and yes it’s a really powerful blog :) ). Umbraco is taking over.

If you’ve never used it, give it a try. It’s not just a CMS , it’s a CMS builder. You design your site’s content structure exactly as you want it. The main thing lacking for Umbraco is no “theming” capability because every site is unique you don’t have those standard page and post content types WordPress relies on. As a result you can’t predict the output for someone else’s site and can’t create generic theme’s.

From an online magazine, newspaper or similar site’s perspective, this is so powerful to be able to build the structure of your CMS to work how you need, not how the developers dictate. That’s why it’s the #1 CMS in Europe (that statistic might be out of date :) ).

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campuscodi says

I don’t know about that. Umbraco is written in ASP .NET.

It’s number one in Europe because Europeans have good .NET educational institutes and developers (my country as well).

The rest of the world still uses PHP . It’s better than DotNetNuke indeed. I tested it in September, but it will take some real programming trends shipments away from PHP for it to be real successful.

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Parallelus says

I don’t know about that. Umbraco is written in ASP .NET.

It’s number one in Europe because Europeans have good .NET educational institutes and developers (my country as well).

The rest of the world still uses PHP . It’s better than DotNetNuke indeed. I tested it in September, but it will take some real programming trends shipments away from PHP for it to be real successful.

I agree, Umbraco being .NET based is a drawback that detracts from it’s success. But it works with MySQL so no expensive SQL Server (only reason it had a chance). But if you’ve used it you can’t argue with how great it is to have that much control over your website. Simply amazing design, although the database structure concerns some people becaues it can grow very fast.

More and more hosts are offering .NET hosting at good prices. And while I don’t like developing in .NET, I hate when languages like that need super expensive IDE ’s and that’s a big minus for me. If I ever went full out Umbraco on anything I’d hire a full-time developer freeing me to design and conceptualize. Let them deal with VisualStudio.

When someone finally cracks the code of a fully functional open source .NET framework (like Mono http://www.mono-project.com) that will change things. It’s good, but never good enough to keep up. The problem with that and Umbraco is they constantly push to the next version of .NET before Mono can adapt.

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