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aeroalquimia says

Some people encrypt part of their code in wordpress themes, but this is ilegal (?)

Wordpress has GPL licence, so you can’t encrypt code, because all code inherit GPL license.

or am i wrong?

http://wordpress.org/development/2009/07/themes-are-gpl-too/

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osigrandi says

I doubt it’s illegal. Only the code that interacts directly with other Wordpress code should fall under GPL .

For instance, if someone were to code an xml news parser and use it to display news in a certain area of the theme, without using any of the default wordpress functions, I think they have every right to encrypt their function or whatever, if they are so inclined.

And if you are referring specifically to themes here on ThemeForest, the Wordpress GPL license is supplemented by an extra license drafted by TF team to ensure authors can still claim copyright over css styles and so on.

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Kiss_Collective says

It’s not illegal. As octofine rightly points out, TF have found a way of circumventing WP GPL to allow copyright over theme styles and non WP-specific function calls. Read the last few words of Mullenweg’s summation.

I remember a few years back when this was a huge issue with the emerging ‘premium theme’ market. TF wasn’t even around back then. There was real concern that the premium theme peddlers were encroaching on the core ethos of WordPress, raising concerns about the monetization of open source software in general.

Personally, I remember feeling profound dismay at the level of greed on display by some of the key premium theme players at the time. They had no respect for all the work that went into laying the open source framework, in fact they had little notion of ethical conduct at all. All they could see were big fat dollar signs.

Things have come a long way since then, and there’s more of a sense of balance. Deep down, part of me wishes that WordPress were able to put in place a legally binding clause that prohibited the commercialization of its extensions. I know 99% of forum users would disagree and say what about mah moneh!! What about mah bills!! What about mah ipad!! So it goes…

There was something noble and positively humanistic about the early days of WordPress. It really felt like a spirit of good in a Web of greed and exploitation, particularly after the dot com boom/bust era. That spirit of good lasted all of 10 minutes…but that’s all part of the modern economic imperative: live by the $ die by the $ but most of all, exploit someone else’s $$$

Still, it was good while it lasted.

Be grateful for your monies theme developers. And Envato, be grateful for your huge monies! Don’t get greedy, and don’t take people for granted, we’re humans not credit cards. ;)

peas n luv

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aeroalquimia says

thanks for clarifying!

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Kiss_Collective says
thanks for clarifying!

No problem.

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