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mikedidthis says

That doesn’t say anything about doru at all. It was merely a hypothesis as to what a review may think.

The problem with code, as I see it, is there is no defined right or wrong way to do something.

We could all code the same concept, and we would all probably do it different. Each of us would have our reasons for the path we choose to code it.

I am not excusing bad code at all. There is an underlining base standard we should all comply to. Well designed and coded themes sell well. Those that aren’t, don’t.
Because he thinks that incompatibility, cluttered code and bad coding is not a bad thing, yes it does say something about doru, the fact that he thinks that way is a pointer to how he thinks when building his own products and how he makes his decisions. Not trying to hate on the man, it’s just an observation based on his response ;)

Doru never said that at all. What he said was the reviewer may turn a blind eye if: a) the design is really strong. b) The code is good, but not as strong as it could be.

He never once mentioned that bad code was ok.

I am sorry to say this, but your replies always seem to be bashful. Lets be positive. Maybe YOU can suggest ways that authors can increase the quality of their code and practices, rather than just saying the code is rubbish and ending.

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CleanScript says

@CiprianTurcu, post a link to your personal portfolio that we can have a look at your coding please. :smug:

You’re missing the point, my personal portfolio has nothing to do with my statement above, but thank you for asking nicely.

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CleanScript says


That doesn’t say anything about doru at all. It was merely a hypothesis as to what a review may think.

The problem with code, as I see it, is there is no defined right or wrong way to do something.

We could all code the same concept, and we would all probably do it different. Each of us would have our reasons for the path we choose to code it.

I am not excusing bad code at all. There is an underlining base standard we should all comply to. Well designed and coded themes sell well. Those that aren’t, don’t.
Because he thinks that incompatibility, cluttered code and bad coding is not a bad thing, yes it does say something about doru, the fact that he thinks that way is a pointer to how he thinks when building his own products and how he makes his decisions. Not trying to hate on the man, it’s just an observation based on his response ;)

Doru never said that at all. What he said was the reviewer may turn a blind eye if: a) the design is really strong. b) The code is good, but not as strong as it could be.

He never once mentioned that bad code was ok.

I am sorry to say this, but your replies always seem to be bashful. Lets be positive. Maybe YOU can suggest ways that authors can increase the quality of their code and practices, rather than just saying the code is rubbish and ending.

Ok, doru said:

Don’t know if is a bad thing, but if the item looks great the reviewer may close an eye on how the code is organized and if the item is not broken, he will approved it.”

And the other part too.That’s what I’m talking about, just because it’s good in design, it validates and has a list in the menu it’s ok to be an awesome product on theme forest? (I’m probably exaggerating a little with the html and css coding standards here, I’m sure there are other standards of checking and approving items).

But seriously, there are people complaining in the comments about some stuff not working. Sure, most authors are fixing and updating. but why are they accepted if broken? How is the code reviewed? what standards? anyone feels that code standards needs to be updated a little(a lot) or is it just me? I mean, what’s the philosophy here? “great designs and crappy code!”

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WebDesignFudge says


@CiprianTurcu, post a link to your personal portfolio that we can have a look at your coding please. :smug:
You’re missing the point, my personal portfolio has nothing to do with my statement above, but thank you for asking nicely.


Yeah, lets see some of your coding.

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CleanScript says



@CiprianTurcu, post a link to your personal portfolio that we can have a look at your coding please. :smug:
You’re missing the point, my personal portfolio has nothing to do with my statement above, but thank you for asking nicely.


Yeah, lets see some of your coding.

Guys, I don’t have to prove myself with my portfolio code to be right on this one. If you look inside a WordPress theme and know compatibility standards you will approve what I am talking about. Install any WordPress theme on theme forest and run any debugger and compatibility plugin checker. You will see it lacks a lot of the core, basic, necessary functionality. My portfolio proves nothing,and is not a valid argument. Ah you are looking for credibility.

Do what I said above with the debugging plugins. Just if you’re curious, so you understand what I am talking about ;)

3711 posts Ruben Bristian
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KrownThemes says

Instead of testing other themes looking for errors you should work and upload something :D

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CleanScript says

Instead of testing other themes looking for errors you should work and upload something :D

I was checking for code standards and how stuff is done. And I was stunned :O

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BroMontana says

@CiprianTurcu
You are very quick to judge reviewers and other authors work, but hesitant to show you own work? That says a lot. Before you carry on judging, make sure you own standards are good enough.
Instead of starting a thread complaining about other authors work, rather help them if you are so good, than judge them.

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CleanScript says

BroMontana (and everybody else who shares his views):

This is not a competition on who has the coolest code.

WordPress code on themes in Themeforest is not compatible with WordPress

Period

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PaddyTaylor says

I am not taking sides anywhere here but I think one major point is being missed here. And that is the prupose of this site. It is a community for people who enjoy design etc to meet, share and ideas and yes sell their products but the vast majority of people do this for fun rather than for a full time living.

I grant you that TF must have some degree of coding/design standards in place but in a community of so many there are inevitably going to be those authors who have more refined skills than others.

If you are building a custom site for someone then really you should not be using templates (no matter how good they are coded or look), and if you go privately to a developer and pay the full price of at very least hundreds if not thousands of $ then you have every right to expect the code to be of a solid standard.
If as people do here they are paying 30-50$ then they cannot really complain if the code is not perfect – especially when they are probably using it for a small project that only requires the theme to work and look good rather than be stringently assessed for errors. Plus I am certain there are people on here buying templates, “editing” them and then selling them to clients at a huge mark up, and In some cases not mentioning the fact they were pre built.

My point is that very few people use TF as a living and I would be confident in saying that those who do and the big gun authors’ code is exceptionally good.

Of course there must be some form of standard in place but at the same time in an environment where many authors are enthusiasts who use it to make a little extra cash and buyers are paying what is not even the hourly rate for some professional developers, you cannot expect perfection.

TF has to find a balance between standards, purpose, products and user needs – otherwise we would barely ever see new files coming through!

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