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zachlebar says

Hey all,

I’m working on a series of themes ( I mentioned it here: http://themeforest.net/forums/thread/a-website-critique/7735 but didn’t go into detail) that im targeting towards an audience that isn’t really too code savvy(restaurateurs). I figured i’d save a few more weeks, if not a month in development, by using a series of XML documents to allow for easy updating of the site, rather than creating a full-blown CMS backend. I’m starting to wonder though, would a CMS backend have been a good idea, and will buyers be scared off by an XML document as much as any other code. Maybe making it dynamic at all, without going all the way to a CMS , is a waste of time.

I’m reworking the site entirely, with a new, better design. So, my past work kinda matters, but now would be the time to change anything major if I want to.

so…done venting, any thoughts? thanks.

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Amanda says

Zachlebar, personally I think you’d be better opting for a CMS than using XML files. Most of the work I do is for people who have little experience with code and web design, and from this experience I would be concerned that even mentioning XML could scare people away from using your templates ;)

For those unfamiliar with coding, I would suggest a CMS template to be the best option as the end-user could update pages/posts/widgets (for sidebar content) without having to touch the template code in any way. This enables buyers to use the template virtually out-of-the-box. They would need only to alter the content of pages, widgets and posts for their site to become live, and not need to learn how to update or use XML :)

I’m most familiar with Blogger, but for restaurant-type sites I’m sure Wordpress would be a much better option. You could also consider that many non-savvy buyers would be familiar with Dreamweaver (or similar interface) for creating web-pages. In this case, a regular HTML template could be something you’d consider.

Hope this information helps you decide how to proceed with your template. I’m sure other members could offer some good guidance for you too :)

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rblalock says

You’re better off with a CMS or something like Contribute. However, if you know some PHP …...and have PHP5 running on the server (which I’m sure you do have it).....then SimpleXML object and it’s methods are great.

I am building a mini-cms for a handful of different uses that only uses XML files (no database). The backend loads the xml and can edit them, save them, etc. without the user ever knowing about it. (it’s still under dev though).

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