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osigrandi says

Here’s the thing…I have a new version of my wp theme coming out…for the past few days I’ve been doing QA to make sure everything works alright, I haven’t forgot to include any of the proposed features, all known bugs are eliminated etc.

There’s been one customer in particular who has proven extremely annoying. I’m actually hoping he sees this thread and takes a hint.

Since the 1st version of the theme has come out, 2 weeks ago, I’ve received literally dozen and dozens of emails from him. I’m not exaggerating.

Most of the questions proved that he either didn’t read the documentation or has decided to ignore my polite comments regarding the fact that I don’t do custom work for free.

I’m curious, how do you personally deal with this type of situation? I usually get pretty upset when someone clearly makes no effort to read the documentation, but I try to reply to emails anyway.

I’m thinking of starting to ignore this customer’s emails, especially since he’s been bugging me for the past few days in regards to when the new version is coming out as well….one reply seems to not have been enough for him. I’ve already told him I’m wrapping it up and will be up very soon.

He asked again today, plus other questions on how to modify stuff. I get the vibe that he’s expecting me to simply cave in and do all the work for him.

Good/bad idea to ignore him?

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doru says

on the base of how you describe the situation, I think you should ignore him. Also you are not obligated to provide assistance for your files.

I think, like in “the real world”, there’s some strange people around, but those are minor incidents. Don’t lose time and emotions on this kind of thing.

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Lovedoodle says

Yeah, in every other situation where you could have annoyance like this, the technique of ignorance works very well. Particularly with stalkers. So, I’d send his emails right to the spam folder and rest easy :)

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Joost Moderator says

I’d say reply politely to the first few emails, pointing him at the documentation. When he starts to spam you with questions or expects you to do stuff for free you’d like to get paid for, perhaps tell him not to do so once or twice if you’re in an extremely good mood – after all, you hold all the right to ignore him. :)

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MSFX Moderator says

Ive had one which was similiar, kept asking for more and more and more alterations, in the end I gave them a quote for what they wanted and stated I was unable and would no longer reply to their emails unless half of it appeared in my account, they then got the point :)

Hope you get it sorted :)

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Ivor Envato team says

Your solution is here:

\\

:D

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osigrandi says
Your solution is here:

\\

:D

lol…yeah…i can’t say i haven’t been tempted but that’s probably too extreme.

i guess i’m really annoyed in general at people who decide they can take advantage of you after you show them kindness.

oh well…i’ll probably let him know when the new version is approved so he can just download it and leave me alone hopefully.

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thomas07 says

on your item page all as first have some sort of message that you do have included an great and detailed help file that buyers schould read first before they come to comment with ton of questions. Indicate that you will answer questions that are not answered on the help file. This above is the friendly and required part for you…out of this you can just ignore them, and dont forget that out there are ton of people expecting to get a whole new planet for the $15 wp theme price. When it comes to customize the product your buyer purchaised, the buyer must understand that this service is not included in the funny $15 price and must be ready to invest decent amount of money to get the thing done. We all know, in the “service industry” in general the client will expect you to agree to “the customer is always right” shit. But if you ask me personaly, here is what i think: The customer is always RIGHT ! right?...WRONG!!!

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DaniMun says

I’ve recently had a similar situation with a customer that not only they repeatedly needed “just a couple of minor adjustments”, obviously free of charge, but they also had the nerve to blame my item for not working as advertised, of course after they did a great job messing with the code.

Luckily that customer didn’t contact me by email, they only used the item forum for their requests.

Needless to say that I’ve lost way too much time first by just explaining to them what to do, and then by trying to let them know the “minor adjustments” they needed were not so easy to achieve hence they should’ve paid for my custom work.

I love helping my customers if they need my assistance, but they should understand that there is a thin line between asking for my help and taking advantage on my work and develpment time.

Just my 2 cents here

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Aw_Shucks says

You just inspired a thought with your story, octofine. Simply type out a message saying, “Look at the help file to make your own modifications suited to your standards. I don’t work for free. Stop sending me requests. Thank you.”

When you’ve completed that task, send it 30 times in a row. HAHAHAhahaha!

edit

Of course, I’m only kidding.

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