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bombernet says

Hello people!

I have a question related to pixel perfect designs and themes in PSD. Directions to pixel perfect mostly in typography? Below is the demo of an image in a project in Fireworks, plus my doubt is also for Photoshop. http://oi39.tinypic.com/11j6ek8.jpg

There is an exact scale to achieve pixel perfect in Anti-Alias??? Thanks!

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themeflame says

Windows’ Anti is super weird. Not Crisp, not Sharp, nothing looks like the web. (Only crisp sometimes – Try Roboto on Sharp at 13 px and then Crisp, see the difference.). Also, you’ll note a pretty big difference between font sizes (13 px could look very different from 14 px.). All you can do is play and match on Windows. (Well, if you’ve got experience, you’ve nothing to fear – It’ll just flow naturally.)

OS X does it better, it renders fonts exactly as how they’d be rendered on the web. Honestly, you just take a peak at the font and see how it looks, then match yours. It’s really the only way, there’s not much you can do if you’re on Windows but you get almost the same results if you play a bit!

Pixel-Perfection you say? Many people confuse that with (only) pixel-perfect (As non-out-of-place) individual pixels. Like low opacity pixels, as the result of shriking. Well, that’s a part of what “pixel-perfect” is.

It goes deeper than pixel-perfect graphics (icons, images and such.)

Here’s an example: I, myself, like to take the shape tool and make sure spaces between elements are equal. Also, I like to work on a 960px width (not a grid, tho.) but I like the size & the mathematical possibilites for equality in proportions it gives you. A grid would do better if you’re at the begining.

Most element that is overlooked in themes is: Consistency. Not to blame anyone but on a part of the page you’d see circular shapes, rounded fonts and then out of nowhere, squares and edgy things. That’s just terrible but it happens. It mostly happens because designers aren’t aware of such things. They call this error that sells so amazing “Multi-Purpose”. (Sure, there are great examples of very good use of Consistency. Take Salient for example.) But why does this happen? Unless you’re a top-tier designer, it’s really hard to keep the “rhytm” (Which is a synonym to Consistency in my dictionary.) all the way until the finish of a theme.(Now, it’s okay to have circles and 2px radius buttons afterwards, but you need to balance things.) Example of Consistency:

Here’s Vin Diesel: Now, this is what happens when you break consistency:

How do you not break it? Just imagine Vin Diesel keeping it at the same, first frame. Not going “overload”. Or just a bit, but then he’d go back and calm down the spirits. That’s consistency right there. You need to keep a “rhytm”.

Proportions. Now, proportions are awesome. Many people like to use HUGE fonts inside small things, not giving that “air” an element needs. I believe that when an element breathes, your brain also does. Information needs to flow. A flow also needs its “free spots” aswell, otherwise it’d flood. (Does that make sense?). Practical Example: Your body. It looks good. Nothing big, nothing small. (If you’re normal.). If you study PI and its value, you see how well connected proportions are. People don’t see this in web, unfortunately, too often. Attention: This differs a lot, based on your target. The older the target is, the bigger the things should be, since people’s views are affected by aging. So there’s a lot to speak about on that.

That’s just a slice of what pixel-perfection is. Altough many designers would just tell you it’s “no pixels out of place.”.

How long does it take to master these? Perhaps 1 week if you have somebody to teach you, who already knows all of that. Years if you do it alone. It’s really simple at first glance, but the more you get in, the harder it gets and the more you discover and you’re soon on the road of “Man, I’ll never end this learning!”

My suggestion? Unless you love this and you have a dream based on Design, don’t even get started! It’s a lot of work. Also, it’s super connected with Psychology, but that’s another story!

Read Smashing Magazine’s Books. Very good ones. If you need some more insight, feel free to message me!

Pardon my mistakes if there are any but it’s been 2 days since I last slept well.

Hope it helps.

Cheers, themeflame.

//Edit: Man, I wrote a novel. I shall get to sleep!

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Deharlan says

Omg, I’ll take the necessary time to read it all, and very likely I go to copy and paste somewhere.

i and Bombernet, we are learning to get here on Themeforest, You’ll help us a lot with these tips that made us.

Thank you so much, i will follow you now.

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