1734 posts
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Has sold $5,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
+2 more
VisualSharing says
westom said
Planned obsolescence is how one takes minimal facts, adds wild speculation, and then comes to a subjective conclusion. Then one need not learn how the work gets done. Throwing more money at a bulb only works in the myths taught in business schools.

I already stated that it’s not a myth, it is how companies work and it’s how managers are being taught to think. “Throwing more money at something” is how that business thingy works unfortunately. Cartels are too common in every country. :) It’s not the 20th century when HDD ’s “were powered by oil” – it’s the 21st century when people are greedy and want your last buck in any way. That’s the reality, like it or not.

westom said
NASA (during the so many GOES satellite failures) spent significantly to make a longer light bulb. Research concluded what light bulb companies had already learned in massive research projects a generation earlier. NASA never got a longer life bulb.

Wel, duh. :D Why don’t you tell them to lower the voltage and get a 467-years-lasting bulb? (I am not being sarcastic, it’s just that you make it sound so simple that I’d call NASA right away.)

westom said
More money was never going to change fundamental science.
Apparently, fundamental science acquired a lot better bulbs a few decades ago, which are still working with today’s voltage.
westom said
It is not hard to make that light bulb work 2000 hours. Learn numbers before posting. Lower 120 VAC to 108. Now the bulb lasts four times longer. Nothing new. No conspiracy. The science was well proven many generations ago.
At no place in the video was mentioned that lowering the voltage won’t work.
westom said
Junk science and the resulting urban myths are plentiful when subjective business school concepts replace science and numbers. What you have defined as planned obsolescence is only a symptom of what business school graduates understand and constantly do – cost controls.

I am glad you finally accepted that planned obsolescence is a reality. But I don’t see the connection with business graduates, since most of business owners are just experts in their fields, which is a great thing.

westom said
Planned obsolescence assumes a business school graduate knows something about the product. If he did, then he would not be using cost controls.
It’s exactly the opposite actually. :)


Now back on topic – I am planning to buy an ARTronic device to get some precious minutes to save all data – they are cheap in here and I had some good references from friends. This year I lost some unsaved WIP due to blackouts. :(
by
by
by
by
by
by