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familychoice says

We’ve been waiting for a template (for a certain type of service) to arrive on Themeforest for years, and suddenly two have arrived at once. I’m not going to ‘call out’ the service type, but they’re both good templates and aside from a few tweaks would work perfectly for the website we have in mind.

Only problem is, after checking the license T&C’s, both would require an Extended License as the finished sites would charge end users. One template doesn’t even have the Extended License option available (despite having a built in payments system), and the other lists it as around $2500.

I couldn’t see us making more than $1000 per year from a site using this template, and when you add on the time spent setting up and customising the template, branding, hosting costs, time spent promoting and marketing the site, site management and updates, plus time spent attracting members, we’d be lucky to get our money back within 5 years.

Do authors set the Extended License cost or is this set by Envato? If so maybe we can persuade the author to lower the price as it’s about ten times more expensive than the equivalent non-Wordpress solutions available. If not, and it’s set by Envato then maybe this needs to be looked at as it’s going to be way too expensive for most small site owners and others have queried the costs in the theme’s comments sections. Maybe there should be a separate license for paid services?

I’m not in any way trying to undervalue the work that has gone into these themes, they’re both great and if that’s the cost for the license then fair enough, but it won’t work for us as for this price we wouldn’t get a return on our investment. Which is a shame as they’re great themes but the cost is going to put off a lot of customers.

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MSFX Volunteer moderator says

it’s a standard multiplier set by Envato… author can only opt in or out.

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VF says

@familychoice, you can just try custom freelance work to complete the same project. Understandably rare case utilizations can be done better through custom works within budget.

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Parallelus says

I can’t imagine taking the time to build, market and maintain a website service that is going to earn $1,000 a year. Let’s say you value your time at $50/hour. If you spend more than 20 hours a year working on that site you’ve already got a loss. Even if it makes ten times that but you’re saying it could profit $1,000 a year, why bother? If the slightest thing goes wrong with the site and you have to put in a full day to fix, update or maintain it you’ve blown your budget for the year.

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familychoice says

Thanks for the replies :)


it’s a standard multiplier set by Envato… author can only opt in or out.

Ah right. I think they need another license type then as I don’t need multiple licenses, just one to start with.


@familychoice, you can just try custom freelance work to complete the same project. Understandably rare case utilizations can be done better through custom works within budget.

We have developers available here, and I could probably knock something up myself, but it probably wouldn’t be worth the time/cost for the return we’d get. That’s why themes with extra functionality built in are sometimes cost effective options. You don’t see it very often on here, but some other theme suppliers provide (almost) turnkey themes.

Saying that I think if there isn’t an option to purchase these themes at a lower price I may have a go at putting something similar together myself using plugins, just to see if it can be done for less than $2500.


I can’t imagine taking the time to build, market and maintain a website service that is going to earn $1,000 a year. Let’s say you value your time at $50/hour. If you spend more than 20 hours a year working on that site you’ve already got a loss. Even if it makes ten times that but you’re saying it could profit $1,000 a year, why bother? If the slightest thing goes wrong with the site and you have to put in a full day to fix, update or maintain it you’ve blown your budget for the year.

We don’t make that hourly rate here, but I understand your point. If the theme was say, $60 or a $100 then we could put out a site and potentially make a small profit. If it works out then we can buy another license and put out a second site quicker and make a better return.

For some online services this works well, and we might put out say, 40 sites of a similar nature and make a good return from them collectively. With the type of service these themes cover though this wouldn’t be possible, and I doubt we’d publish more than a couple of sites. The market is already flooded with established competition for this type of service so attracting members would be very time consuming. It’s a service type we wanted to test out and it may make more than $1000 per year, but $2500 plus other costs is too much to risk on a punt.

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MSFX Volunteer moderator says

Thanks for the replies :)

it’s a standard multiplier set by Envato… author can only opt in or out.

Ah right. I think they need another license type then as I don’t need multiple licenses, just one to start with.

you misunderstood. The extended license cost is proportionate to the theme, it’s a multiplier of 50 or something…

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CanCars says

Huh?? so you are saying if we buy a theme and start making money from the site we owe the author a cut? or need an extended lic.?? that makes no sense. If you buy 1 theme and use it on 1 site, what does the amount of revenue have to do with anyone else??

sorry if I’m missing the point here but ..I’m lost

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charlie4282 says

It’s when multiple users pay to use a site you need that license. For example you buy a theme for a single client I.e. one use that’s all good on a normal license but if multiple people are paying to join, download, benefit etc then technically that’s multiple clients so you need an extended license

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squaredWeb says

Huh?? so you are saying if we buy a theme and start making money from the site we owe the author a cut? or need an extended lic.?? that makes no sense. If you buy 1 theme and use it on 1 site, what does the amount of revenue have to do with anyone else?? sorry if I’m missing the point here but ..I’m lost

As far as i understand that licence stuff, please correct me if i am wrong here, is that its not about if you make money from the site, its about how.

For example, if you make a lot of money from ad revenue, thats no problem at all, the regular licence is enough. But if you make money from direct payment of your visitors, think a dating site with a monthly fee for example, you need the extended licence. This only applies if you charge people for using your page, so online shops for example who charge for products, not the usage itself, are fine with a regular licence as well.

Like i said, please correct me if this is wrong, its how i understood it, but i am not sure myself.

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familychoice says

you misunderstood. The extended license cost is proportionate to the theme, it’s a multiplier of 50 or something…

ok thanks for the clarification, but that seems a bit steep. It means that you only need a single, standard license to buy a theme that promotes a service, such as a web design company, that could potentially make a lot of money from inquiries as a direct result of the theme. Whereas you need a multiple 50x extended license if your site sells membership subscriptions, even though you still may be using only a single copy, and making much less money from it than a standard business site.


For example, if you make a lot of money from ad revenue, thats no problem at all, the regular licence is enough. But if you make money from direct payment of your visitors, think a dating site with a monthly fee for example, you need the extended licence. This only applies if you charge people for using your page, so online shops for example who charge for products, not the usage itself, are fine with a regular licence as well.

That seems to be the case, but I think it’s bizarre to charge a site using a theme to sell subscriptions 50x more than a business website promoting services, or a shopping cart site potentially selling thousands of products every year.


It’s when multiple users pay to use a site you need that license. For example you buy a theme for a single client I.e. one use that’s all good on a normal license but if multiple people are paying to join, download, benefit etc then technically that’s multiple clients so you need an extended license

But wouldn’t that also be the case for shopping cart sites? They also feature member accounts, can provide downloads etc. They’re both member based websites selling services/products from a single domain/website.

What happens if I buy a basic, business theme with a Standard License, but then use a plugin such as Gravity Forms to sell subscriptions for members-only content? Gravity Forms don’t impose an extra cost for this, but would this then mean the theme I purchased now requires an Extended License?

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